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Genealogy of the Moody and Crandall, Hood and Linder families
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201
In 1900 the original census image reads Jemie not Jennie
1900 US Census Fairview, Russell, Kansas
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MMYK-X2C
Thomas Collinsworth Head M Apr 1849 51 Single IN KY KY
Jennie Collinsworth Niece F Jun 1873 26 Widowed 1 1 IN IN IN
Glenn F Collinsworth Cousin M Apr 1895 5 Single KS IL IN 
Source (S734)
 
202
In 1920 an Enumerator mistake has to have been made.
Fay and Leslie Linder appear as grandchildren
of Eliza Davidson who is without doubt Louisa Dunn
Davidson, grandmother of Fay and Leslie Linder. Eliza
Linder is listed as the daughter of Eliza Davidson.
She has to be Louise Davidson Pember who was the mother
of Fay and Leslie Linder.
Frank R Davidson also appears a few doors away.
He is the son of Edwin J and Ula Davidson. Edwin is the
brother of Louise Davidson Linder.
1920 US Census Union, Van Wert, Ohio
38 Frank R Davidson Head M abt 1899 21 Married OH OH OH
Goldie A Davidson Wife F abt 1900 20 Married OH OH OH
39 Edward J Davidson Head M abt 1867 53 Married OH OH OH
Ella Davidson Wife F abt 1888 32 Married IA OH OH
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDYM-VMP
40 Eliza Davidson Head F abt 1845 75 Widowed IA OH IL
Eliza Linder Daughter F abt 1868 52 Widowed OH OH OH
Fay Linder Granddau F abt 1895 25 Single OH OH OH
Leslie Linder Grandson M abt 1902 18 Single OH OH OH 
Source (S1609)
 
203
In the 1880 US Census FamilySearch has the order of the
individuals wrong. The order here matches the original
document.
1880 US Census Franklin, Franklin, Ohio
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8M8-822
Mary Harrison Self F abt 1828 52 Widowed VA VA VA
Edmund Harrison Son M abt 1852 28 Single VA VA VA
Fannie Harrison Dau F abt 1854 26 Single VA VA VA
Macon Harrison Son M abt 1856 24 Single VA VA VA
Lizzie Harrison Dau F abt 1859 21 Single VA VA VA
Patsey Harrison Dau F abt 1861 19 Single VA VA VA
Mary Harrison Dau F abt 1863 17 Single VA VA VA
William Harrison Son M abt 1866 14 --- VA VA VA
Benjamin Harrison Son M abt 1872 8 --- OH VA VA 
Source (S1882)
 
204
Is Wesly, Russell (father) in 1870? Age and birth place matches.
What was Russell's full name?
The enumerator did not use the old fashioned "e" on other names
1870 US Census Adams, Morgan, Indiana
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX67-XJG
Wesley Colensworth F abt 1813 57 Tennessee
Thomas Colensworth M abt 1845 25 Indiana
Nathaniel Colensworth M abt 1849 21 Indiana 
Source (S692)
 
205
It appears that Jeanette married her sister Nettie's husband Philo. To do this Nettie probably passed away and Jeanette's husband passed away. No marriage record was found to tie Jeanette and Philo.
Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8JN-JSS
Name: Jeanette Shepard
Event Type: Death
Event Date: 06 Mar 1926
Event Place: Wellington, Lorain, Ohio
Gender: Female
Age: 59
Marital Status: Married
Race: w
Occupation: housewife
Birth Date: 03 Jan 1867
Birthplace: Wellington, Ohio
Birth Year (Estimated): 1867
Burial Date: 08 Mar 1926
Burial Place: Wellington, Ohio
Father's Name: Asa Damon
Father's Birthplace: Mass.
Mother's Name: Eliza Loomis
Mother's Birthplace: Champion, N.Y.
Spouse's Name: Philo Shepard 
Source (S1380)
 
206
James Thomason is listed as the father-in-law in the
1900 US Census. However Francis has her father listed
in the 1900 and the 1910 Census as born in Georgia.
This may be a mistake made by the enumerator. Two of her
children have named "Green" as their mother.
1900 US Census Civil District 21 (east part) Dyer town Ward 1, Gibson, Tennessee
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS8N-C7J
J T Gauldin Head M Oct 1852 48 Married 22yrs TN TN TN
Cornelius Gauldin Wife F May 1862 38 Married 22yrs 6 4 GA GA GA
O E Gauldin Son M Feb 1882 18 Single TX TN GA
Essie Gauldin Dau F Nov 1892 8 Single TN TN GA
Ruby Gauldin Dau F Dec 1895 5 Single TN TN GA
Homer C Gauldin Son M Jan 1900 0 Single TN TN GA
Jas Thomason Father-in-law M May 1826 74 Widowed TN NC GA 
Source (S1965)
 
207
John Rember
Find A Grave
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=37178074
Birth: Apr. 24, 1781
Death: May 20, 1842
Quebec, Canada
Family links:
Spouse:
Dianah Wilson Rember (____ - 1844)
Children:
John Rember (1823 - 1868)*
*Calculated relationship
Burial: Southridge Cemetery
Aird, Monteregie Region, Quebec, Canada
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Jacky Gamble
Record added: May 17, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 37178074

England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973
Name: John Rember
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 16 Aug 1813
Marriage Place: Lowthorpe,York,England
Spouse: Dinah Wilson
FHL Film Number: 919201

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N5N6-7JD
Name Ann Rember
Gender Female
Christening Date 02 Oct 1814
Christening Place LOWTHORPE,YORK,ENGLAND
Father's Name John Rember
Mother's Name Dinah

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N5N6-WRQ
Name Thomas Rember
Gender Male
Christening Date 24 Jul 1817
Christening Place LOWTHORPE,YORK,ENGLAND
Father's Name John Rember
Mother's Name Dinah

"John Pember, The History of the Pember Family in America"
Compiled By Mrs. Celeste Pember Hazen
Page 111-113
57. John5 (John4, John3, John2, Thomas1)
b. Lebanon Crank, Conn., abt 1777
d. prob. Abt. 1816, Lysander (Hannibal), N. Y.
(No desc. Offers records)
m. 1798 or later, Poultney, Vt., Diana Willson. Some of her folks stayed
in the Poultney-Hampton home; others went north in Vt. and Can.
ch:
114. John, Jr. b. Vt. or Can., 1800
115. Alanson b. Poultney, Vt., 1803/4
-- William b. " "
-- Thomas Rember (so-called)
-- Robert " "
-- Anna ? m. (---) Keats; res. Quebec
-- Maria ? m. (---) Drew; " Bolton, P. Q.
-- Mary ? m. (---) Johnson; rem. northern Ontario
(possibly 1 or 2 more)
There is a Wells land deed to John, Jr., from his father, and anothe r from Ralph Bell
or Bill (who m, Kesiah, dau. John Reynolds, Sr. of E. Wells.) Later John , Jr. deeded the
home land back to Frederick.
He is said to have gone to Canada with some of the relatives, but re turned. The 1800
Census of Wells seems to count him in his father's family. He is always s poken of as residing
in Poultney, and probably occupied the land his father owned in Poultney ; perhaps also that
which his uncles' families had left. No deeds remain, but an old grand li st names John Pember,
Jr. in Poultney in 1815; he had not sold it before removing, and there ma y have been relatives
still occupying it. His marriage is known to have been in Poultney, and h e had several children
before permanent removal, the older ones of similar age to his father's y oungest. He removed by
way of Canada, or removed twice; for he had at some date established a ho me near Ormstown, P. Q.
Thence was an easy trip by water to Oswego County, where two of his siste rs and other friends
settled. Tradition has it that he settled on the land which his father ha d taken up in Lysander
(the part which-became Hannibal), died there and was buried in the old ya rd near his home.
(Lewis Cem.) Widow Diana and her children, except Alanson who remained wi th relatives, made her
way back to Ormstown, and her descendants suppose she lived there until d eath.
At that time most of them cease to be members of the Pember family . Whether a
school-teacher misread the name supplied, or whether the change was inten tional for some reason
sufficient at the time, they appear hence-forward as Rember, and their ch ildren believe it was
always thus.
The daughters may have left records, but their families have not be en located in this
work, since they are not in this country.
Concerning the "Rember" sons named above, relatives say all three l ived in Quebec, one
near Stanbridge, one at St. Armand Ctr. who had two sons and removed wit h them to Vesta,
Arkansaw, and Thomas at Magog. The latter left a son now living at Verdun ; Verdun has several
Rembers.
On William "Rember", the following is contrib. by gt. gr. ch., an d Cern. R:
William d. abt. 1830
res. Magog, P. Q. Both he and wife were "English" (not French)
ch: Among them was
Martha Rember b. Sept. 9, 1824; d. Feb. 27, 1897; bur. Canton, Minn.
m. Martin Beach, b. Aug. 14, 1818; d. Sept. 19, 1890,
Canton, Minn.
res. Quebec; rem. Marion, Wayne Co., N. Y; to Kalamazoo, Mich;
in 1867 to Canton, Minn. and settled on land 2 mi S. and
1 1/2 mi. E. of Canton. With his brother Jesse Beach
(1826-1898), a pioneer in Mich. and Minn.
ch (prob all b. in the East) 4:
1. Van Buren J. Beach, 1849-1925, res. Canton
m. Adelia Capron who d. after 1930
ch. none
2. Jesse O. Beach, b. June 2,1851; d. July l, 1926, Canton.
m. Sarah A. Mitson, b. Jan. 18, 1849; d. Apr. 28, 1927
ch: Ella Beach m. (----) Dahl
Edith " m. (----) Wilford
ch : Ward, Bruce, Gary, Vera, Wilford.
Vera m. (----)Brauer
Arthur "
Bennie "
Leslie " of Canton, Minn.
Lida " m. (----) Kiefer
3. Mary Beach b. 1855, abt
m. (1) (----) Hubble; (2) (----) Rich; res Canton
ch. 2. Claud Hubble
Iva " m.(1) (----) Smith; (2) (----) Sloan
res. Linton, S. D.
4. Candis Beach, m. (----) Hubble, bro. of above.
res. Amboy, Minn.
ch. l, Angie Hubble, m. Robert Sturgeon, Amboy, Minn.

In answer to an inquiry concerning the name Rember in Ormstown, P. Q., th e Protonotaire
du district de Beauharnais states that records filed begin with 1832, an d "there are
traces of records between 1848 and 1856 under the name Rembers, which rec ords are partly
of children of birth to Robert and Thomas, and furthermore there is a mar riage entry in
1846 of Thomas Rembers to Ann Monteith, at the Huntingdon Episcopal Churc h."
(Is this bridegroom son, or grandson, of John-5 Pember?)
N. B. There is no reason to suppose that any kind of records were being m ade in Hannibal
(then in Lysander) at the time of John's death. Either county has few pri or to 1830.

John Rember
Find A Grave
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=37178074
Birth: Apr. 24, 1781
Death: May 20, 1820
Clarenceville, Quebec, Canada
Family links:
Spouse: Dianah Wilson Rember (____ - 1844)
Burial: Southridge Cemetery
Aird, Monteregie Region, Quebec, Canada
Created by: Jacky Gamble
Record added: May 17, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 37178074 
REMBER, John (I13176)
 
208
Lillie Dell Moss Weaver
FIND A GRAVE
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=61952560
Birth: Nov. 2, 1869
Valleytown, Cherokee County, North Carolina, USA
Death: Jul. 11, 1949
Boise, Ada County, Idaho, USA
Family links:
Parents:
Henry Alexander Moss (1836 - 1908)
Mary Melvina Farmer Moss (1844 - 1912)
Spouse:
George H Weaver (1871 - 1957)*
Children:
Myrtle Vivian Weaver Linder (1892 - 1961)*
Fern Gertrude Weaver Johnson (1901 - 1974)*
Marie Susan Weaver Holmes (1903 - 1972)*
Siblings:
Columbus William Moss (1864 - 1865)*
Joshua Henry Moss (1867 - 1884)*
Lillie Dell Moss Weaver (1869 - 1949)
Ollie T. Moss Newman (1872 - 1968)*
Markie Moss (1877 - 1895)**
*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling
Burial: Morris Hill Cemetery
Boise, Ada County, Idaho, USA
Plot: MHILL_N_87_6
Maintained by: Sue Ann Harfst
Originally Created by: MDiggens
Record added: Nov 21, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 61952560 
Moss, Lillie Dell (I8749)
 
209
Mabel Hunt, "Vermont Vital Records, 1760-2008" (Death)
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFBL-QRQ
Event Type Death
Event Date 10 Aug 1961
Event Place Waterbury, Washington, Vermont, United States
Gender Female
Father's Name Ira S Morrill
Mother's Name Eliza Emery
Spouse's Name William Hunt 
MORRILL, Mabel Ellen (I17453)
 
210
Mary's brother Alonzo is the father of Lynn
1910 US Census Northampton, Rooks, Kansas
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2ZS-BSD
Andy I Linder Head M abt 1869 41 Married1 16yrs MO IL MO
Mary C Linder Wife F abt 1871 39 Married1 16yrs 1 1 PA PA PA
Lloyd Linder Son M abt 1895 15 Single KS MO PA
Lynn Best Nephew M abt 1906 4 Single KS PA KS 
Source (S746)
 
211
Mary's middle name is found in her son's obituary
Obituary for James Blake Striplin Jr
http://www.prattvillememorial.com/obituaries/James-Striplin/#!/Obituary
Mr. Striplin was preceded in death by his wife of 60 years, Evelyn Dunkin Smith Striplin; his sister-in-law, Ann Smith Taylor; his parents, James Blake Striplin and Mary Juanita Nelson Striplin Smith; and his step-father, Carleton Gibson Smith. 
Source (S1744)
 
212
Mathew is not correct, census was very difficult to read. Marcus is correct
1900 US Census Precincts 15, 18 Kentuck, Munford Jenifer town,
Talladega, Alabama
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M963-F9J
Mathew T Linder Head M Jun 1862 38 Married 4yrs AL SC AL
Mattie L Linder Wife F Apr 1863 37 Married 4yrs 2 2 AL AL GA
Morris L Striplin Stepson M Sep 1888 12 Single AL AL AL
James B Striplin Stepson M May 1890 10 Single AL AL AL 
Source (S530)
 
213
Mike,
My name is Brian Moody and I am a 7th great grandson of Thomas Moody an d Ann Lawrence through their son Samuel Moody. Over the last few years , I have noticed your postings of your ancestry which includes that of Th omas Moody and Ann Lawrence descendents through their son Samuel Moody, e tc. I have been pleased with the effort you have made to support the inf ormation you have included and occasional corrections. I also see that y ou have included some research and reference to Janice McAlpine's work o n the lines. I am very familiar with Janice's work and have regular cont act with her as we share information. I greatly respect her research an d documentation. We have collaborated for several years now and are in a greement on almost all of her conclusions. The purpose of this e-mail i s to identify a couple of areas that I believe are incorrect in your reco rd as well as another one which disagrees with Janice's opinion.

I noticed that you show the birth of Samuel Moody, Jr. (son of Samuel Moo dy, and grandson of Thomas Moody and Ann Lawrence) as abt 1689 and deat h as 15 Nov 1737. I believe the birth year estimate is incorrect as wel l as the death date. According to the will of Francis Redford dated 16 Ma y 1682, Samuel Moody, Jr. was named as his "grandsono-in-law." Samuel Mo ody Jr. had to have been born before 16 May 1682 in Charles City County , Virginia in order to have been included in his step-grandfather's will . Will of Francis Redford [step-grandfather] dated 16 May 1682, recorde d 5 Dec 1693 Henrico Co, VA: Francis Redford left "one mare to grandson-i n-law [step-grandson] Samuel Moody Jr." Colonial Wills of Henrico County , VA part l 1654-1737 Abstracted & Compiled by Benjamin B Weisiger lll pa ge 457.
As to the death of Samuel Moody, Jr., it should be 15 December 1737 not N ovember. The death date recorded in the "Moody Family Book" and the "Joh n Wyatt Moody Family, Past and Present" is guessed as 15 Nov 1737 but thi s is incorrect. Their source is from a republished account in the Willia m and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. V, page 242. Obit. in William and M ary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. V, page 242. Month is undated in this entry , but one above is dated 9 Dec 1737: "Samuel Moody and another white man , going a ducking in a very small canoe in Moorcock Creek, by Chicahomin y Ferry, were upset and drowned the 15th instant." It was guessed in th e Moody Books that the month should be November. This is errant as evide nced from the original obituary in the Virginia Gazette, Personal Notice s of which I have photo copy. The original Virginia Gazette notice is i n the weekly paper dated 23 Dec, 1737 for the week from Friday, Decembe r 16 to Friday, December 23. It says: "Last Thursday the 15th Inst. Samu el Moody, and another white Man, going a Ducking in a very small Canoe i n Moorcock Creek, by Chicahominy Ferry, were over-let and both drowned. " SO HIS DEATH WAS ACTUALLY Dec 15, 1737 not November as suspected in th e MFB from the W&M Quarterly record. Library of Virginia/Digital Collecti on: Virginia Gazette, Parks, December 23, 1737.


It is Janice's opinion that there is no evidence that Samuel Moody, Jr' s son Thomas Moody (1718-1819) ever lived in Cumberland County, Virginia , but there is evidence that he was in Cumberland Parish in Lunenburg Cou nty as early as 1739 or 1749. To support that opinion, she gives the basi s as two records. (1) "The Southside Virginia Land that became MIDLOTHIAN ," by June Banks Evans (2005): "On 22 Sep 1739, William Gooch, governor o f Virginia Colony, in consideration of 11 pounds sterling/15 shillings; g ranted John Edloe a tract of 2354 acres situated "in the County of Brunsw ick on the South side of the Flatt Rock Creek and on both side of the Bea ver Pond Branch."[PB18:502] The boundary began "at a hickory in the for k between the said Flatt Rock Creek and Beaver Pond Creek and then nort h along Beaver Pond Creek to the mouth of a branch of the "Cattails" an d along various meanders and branches of Beaver Pond to a corner and alon g MOODY'S line to a branch of Flatt Rock Creek, then down the creek "to B roadnax's corner white oak at the Falls" and along his line to the beginn ing.. In 1746, this Edloe tract became in the jurisdiction of Lunenbur g County."
It was Janice's opinion that Thomas Moody must not have sold all of the 3 01 acres to Edward Broadnax on 6 December 1738 which he had inherited fro m his father. Therefore, the "Moody's Line" reference in the 1739 docume nt regarding John Edloe was referring to Thomas Moody with him having som e residue of the 301 acres he inherited from his father because the origi nal 301 acres was on Flatt Rock Creek. This conclusion is also in erro r as the following records clearly show that all of the 301 acres were so ld to Edward Broadnax. This means that the 1739 account naming "Moody's l ine" cannot be assumed to be Thomas Moody. The amount of acreage sold i s not stated in the W&M Qrtly account, but Pioneers and Cavaliers, Abstra cts of Land Patents and Grants, Volume 5, page 24 shows that Edward Broad nax patented 871 acres including the 301 acres granted Samuel Moody 10 Ju ne 1737 & by them sold to said Broadnax and patented by Broadnax 30 Jul 1 742 (Brunswick Co. Patent Book 20. p360). Also it is recorded in the Th e Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 26, Number 2, image 6 2 &63, "Brunswick County Land Patent Book 20, Edward Broadnax, 871a, Brun swick Co., Both Sides Flatt Rock Cr., (p.359), 570a of the Tract formerl y g. Hannah Rains 28 Sep 1732, 301a, the Residue, formerly g. Samuel Mood y 10 Jun 1737 & by them sold to sd. Broadnax (p.360) 30 July 1742."
(2) Lunenburg County, Virginia Will book 4, page 29:
March 13, 1779
Philemon Russell, deceased
Division of negroes belonging to the estate of Philemon Russell, deceased :
Silas L800 to Jeffrey Russell, he paying estate L310
Abraham L800 to William Russell, he paying estate L310
Betty and her young child L670 to Phill Russell, he paying estate L180
--- L800

Nan to Molly Russell L400
and to receive for the estate 90
Bett to Jenny Russell 320
and to receive for the estate 170
Ben to Sally Russell 240
and to receive for the estate 250
Jenny to Betsey Russell 200
and to receive for the estate 290

March 13, 1749 by David Garland
Phillip Rich(?)
William Fisher
Thomas Moody
Please note that Philemon Russell died in 1779 not 1749. Part of the tra nscription uses the correct date of March 13, 1779 but the bottom uses th e date of March 13, 1749. This is the date that Janice used in her docum entation, but it is in error. The bottom line is that the earliest recor d we have of Thomas Moody being in residence in Lunenburg County, Virgini a is 1763 although there is land record of 1762 and possibly 1761.. 1763 . "Cumberland Parish--Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816 & Vestry Boo k 1746-1816." Bell, Landon C., Orig. Published Richmond, VA 1930, Reprint ed: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Greenville, SC (1995) At a Vestry he ld 30 Sep 1763, it was ordered that "processioning be done in the Precenc t of THOMAS MOODYS" and be reported March 1764 when completed. Vestry Bo ok 1746-1816, p. 402.
1763/1764. "Cumberland Parish--Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816 & Ves try Book 1746-1816." Bell, Landon C., Orig. Published Richmond, VA 1930 , Reprinted: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Greenville, SC (1995) Page 5 11
1763/1764RETURNS OF PROCESSIONING in obedience to an Order Of Vestry of t he 30th of Septembr., 1763, of Cumberland Parish.
No. 1......Thomas Moodys, etc.
Land records 1761 & 1762:
1761. Lunenburg Deek Book 7, p. 200-201, item 132. "THOMAS MOODY of PGC O 22 Dec 1761 200a Lunenburg/ both sides Stoney Cr."
Page 200. Dec. 22, 1761 From William Beal of L, to Thomas Moody of the C ounty of Prince George, for 75 pounds, a certain tract of land in L on bo th sides of Stony Cr, about 200 acres b ounded by the mouth of the Sprin g Branch, it being the upper end of a tract of land granted to William At kinson for 304 acres by patent dated Nov 25, 1743 in Brunswick County no w L. Signed William (Mhis mark) Beal. Wit. James Neblitt, Frncis Neblitt , elisabeth Nelitt, Mary, the wife of William Beal, relinquished her righ t of dower to the conveyed lands. Recorded Apr. 6, 1762.
[We know from other records listed below that THOMAS MOODY (1718) had pr operty on Stoney Creek, so this is almost certainly our Thomas, but a que stion is raised about "PGCO" which means Prince George County. It is quit e likely that he also hadroperty in Prince George County, since it was cr eated from Charles City County where his father also had property, whic h he likely inherited and it could have been in PGCO.]
1762. Lunenburg County, Viorginia Deeds, 1757-1763, TLC Genealogy, Maima i Beach, Fl. 1990, page 45
Deed Book 7, page332. Aug 3, 1762 from William Bull of L, planter, to Nic holas Edmunds, merchant, of Brunswick County, for 40 pounds all that trac t of land in L on th west side of Stony Cr. containing about 227 acres, a nd bounded by Mathew Orgain, THOMAS MOODY, Parnal, the Ridge Path, Edloe , Parker. Signed William (M his mark) Bull. Wit none. Mary, the wife o f William Bull, relinquished her right of dower to the conveyed lands. R ecorded Aug 3, 1762.

The point is that I have searched the microfilm court and land records o f Lunenburg County without finding any evidence of Thomas Moody in resid ence in Lunenburg County before 1761. This refutes Janice's opinion tha t Thomas Moody could not have been the one in Cumberland County. Unlik e Janice's opinion, there is evidence that Thomas Moody was in Cumberlan d County. Please remember the (1)Dr. Thomas Moody(1759) Rev. War pensio n application of 1833 wherein he states under oath that he was born "9 No vember 1759 in Cumberland County, Virginia" and further states that h e was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia with his family when he entere d service in the Spring of 1776, (2) the belief that Dr. Thomas Moody(17 59) is the son of Thomas Moody (1718). We would expect Cumberland Count y records to corroborate his claim of birth there, and we would expect re cords to support the claim that Dr. Thomas Moody (1759) is the son of Tho mas Moody, Sr.(1718). The pension record is direct evidence and Janice' s claim that it is a mistake is only opinion and assumption.
There are few extant Cumberland County records, but there are 1758, 175 9 and 1760 Cumberland County tax lists. (Cumberland County, Virginia Tiha bles, The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 47, Number 2, Aprilo-June 2003 iss ue, pages 147-151 "Two Cumberland County Tithable Lists, 1758, 1760:" ) The 1758 list shows no Moody family. The 1759 list shows Thomas Mood y ...15 tithes. The 1760 list shows Thomas Moody...6 tithes. There wa s only one Moody family there in 1759 and in 1760 and that was the Thoma s Moody family. There is also a 1757 record of a Benjamin Harris Will wi th a Thomas Moody as witness 4 Sept. 1757 and proved by him 28 May 1759 a t court. Will Bk 1 Pg. 185 Cumberland Co, VA 1759. These are part of a b asis for the claim that Dr. Thomas Moody(1759) was the son of the Thoma s Moody in Cumberland County. These records would seem to corroborate th e declaration under oath in court by Dr. Thomas Moody in his Pension Appl ication.
Dr. Thomas Moody(1759), in his 1833 Rev. War Pension Application File, st ates he was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia with his family when h e entered service in the Spring of 1776 and that he lived in Lunenburg Co unty until about 1790 when he removed to North Carolina. This claim is a lso supported in the Pension Application by an Affidavit provided by Joh n Moody who was then living in Oglethorpe County, Georgia and who state d that he was in his 23rd year living in Lunenburg County not far from Dr . Thomas Moody and accompanied him to the Court House in 1776 where he en tered service and witnessed him marching off. Per evidence of Lunenburg t ax records listed below, it shows Thomas Moody(1718) had sons, John Mood y born 1753 and Thomas Moody, Jr. born 1759. Other Lunenburg records belo w show this Thomas Moody, Jr. lived in Lunenburg County until about 179 0 as his Pension application claims. These evidences from Lunenburg Count y as well as those from Cumberland County establish that Dr. Thomas Moody (1759) was Thomas Moody's(1718) son, Thomas Moody, Jr.(1759).
The information about Cumberland County is complicated by the Revolutiona ry War Pension Application #W.25732 of September 1832 by another Thomas M oody, Jr. (1762) of Oglethorpe County Georgia who in his 1832 applicatio n stated that he was born 1762 in Cumberland County, Virginia where he wa s living when drafted into service in the early summer of 1780. His fath er was also a Thomas Moody(1735-1797) who was married to Judith Ligon an d they lived the remainder of their lives in Cumberland County. This Tho mas Moody was the son of Henry Moody of Chesterfield County, Virginia, wh o we now know from DNA testing is also descended from Samuel Moody (1652) . Thomas (1735) is shown in 1756 tax list in Chesterfield County in th e household of his father Henry Moody. This evidence indicates he is ove r 16 and possibly not yet 21 by 1756, so he was born sometime after 173 5 and likely before 1740. He also is not likely the Thomas Moody who i s listed in the tax record of Cumberland County in 1759 with 15 tithes bu t is more likely Thomas Moody (1718). This Thomas Moody (1735) does no t show in the 1762 Chesterfield tithables list, although his father and s iblings do. This suggests he had married and removed from Chesterfield Co unty to Cumberland County by 1762 per his son’s Pension Application.
Janice believes the 1759 tax record and Benjamin Harris will of 1757 prov ed 1759 are more likely Thomas Moody son of Henry Moody. It becomes a rea l question whether Thomas Moody, son of Henry Moody, could have been witn ess to the will in September 1757. We know that Thomas Moody, son of Hen ry Moody, was resident in Chesterfield County per the tax list of 1757. C hesterfield County, Virginia Tithables, 1757, Binn's Genealogy, image # 3 3
Henry Moodie
Henry Moodie, Jnr
Thomas Moodie
Samuel Moodie
Dick, Hamblon 6
This means that Thomas Moody was still in his father's household as of Ju ne 10, 1757. He was over 16 and could have traveled and been a witness o f the Harris will in Cumberland County in September 1757, but it is mor e likely Thomas Moody 1718. We also know that Thomas Moody, son of Henr y Moody was witness to a land transaction in Chesterfield County per tran scription in November 1759. Chesterfield County, Virginia Deed Book 3, p . 566 2 November 1759. William Walthall of Chesterfield Co., to Willia m Robertson of same, for 50 pounds sterling, land bounded by said Roberts on on Upper Sappony Creek, 200 acres; being part of 400 acres formerly gr anted to Henry Walthall, father to said William, by patent 9 July 1724.
Wit: Henry Walthall, THOMAS MOODY, Christopher Bass.
Signed: William walthall Recorded May 1759? [s/b 1760]
Walthall's wife released her dower.Virginia in 1760:

Evidence also shows that Thomas Moody, believed to be the son of Henry Mo ody, was shown on the 1760 reconstructed tax lists of Chesterfield County . Virginia in 1760: A reconstructed Census, T.L.C. Genealogy, Miami, FL 1 996, 1760-VA page 229:
Moody
Thomas
Chesterfield, 33: 64, 33: 70
These same reconstructed tax lists show another Thomas Moody in Cumberlan d County:
Moody
Thomas
Cumberland, 18:159, 18: 164

This Chesterfield County tax list of 1760 indicates that a Thomas Moody , believed to be the son of Henry Moody, was in residence in Chesterfiel d County in 1760 and that another Thomas Moody was in residence in Cumber land County in 1760. If the information contained in this record is accur ate, it seems to contradict Janice's conclusion that the 1759 and 1760 ta x lists of Thomas Moody in Cumberland County was that of Thomas Moody, so n of Henry Moody. We also know that Thomas Moody, son of Henry Moody, bou ght land in Chesterfield County December of 1760. Chesterfield County, V irginia Deed Books 3&4, page 144; LDS Microfilm, page #33, 5 December 176 0, Vestry of Dale Parish, Chesterfield County for 7 pounds 10 shillings L ots in town laid off on the Glebe Land to: [among others]
Thomas Moody of Chesterfield County, #21. [Note: this sale is signed by t he minister and vestrymen.] Although this land record doesn't indicate re sidence, it does support the 1760 tax record which does indicate residenc e.

Janice counters with evidence that August 1760: John Ratcliff paid Thoma s Moody 1,405 pounds of tobacco for attendance at Chesterfield court a s a witness and for "travelling to Chesterfield." Chesterfield Co., Virg inia, Court Order Book 3, p. 70. She believes this is more likely Thoma s Moody son of Henry Moody coming from Cumberland County because it is i n Chesterfield County where Thomas Moody, son of Henry, was from. Unfort unately, this record doesn't state where the referenced Thomas Moody wa s coming from and if from Cumberland County, it could just as well have b een Thomas Moody 1718.

In 1761 in Chesterfield County, Thomas Moody (son of Henry Moody) was a w itness to a deed transaction of Samuel Hatcher. Chesterfield County, Vir ginia Deed Book 4, Page 546-547, LDS Film 30888, Transcribed by Cecil Q L arsen
This Indenture made this sixth day of February in the year of our lord Ch rist one thousand seven hundred and Sixty one between Samuel Hatcher of D ale parish in Chesterfield county of the one part and Samuel Hatcher of t he parish and county aforesaid of the other part.....Seal the day and yea r first above written.
Samuel Hatcher
Signed sealed and delivered In presence of
Thos Moody
Edward Branch
Henry Moody jun
At a court held for Chesterfield county February 1761
This deed from Samuel Hatcher to Samuel Hatcher was proved by the Oaths o f Thomas Moody Edward Branch and Henry Moody junr witnesses thereto and o rdered to be recorded.
Test. Ben Watkins ___(?)


You can draw your own conclusions from all this, but Janice and I are cur rently trying to figure out what all these evidences actually mean. We s till don't know everything that would define these issues. I just recentl y got the 1758 and 1760 Cumberland County tax list. I am still trying t o get a 1761 and a 1764 Cumberland County tax list which I understand a re archived at the Library of Virginia. We also don't know for sure whe n Thomas Moody, son of Henry, was married and moved to Cumberland County . Thomas Moody's (1735)son Thomas (1762) states he was born in 1762 in Cu mberland County. We, therefore, would expect evidence to support that cl aim. We also have just as valid the claim of Thomas Moody 1759 son of Th omas Moody 1718 that he was born in Cumberland County in 1759. There i s evidence to support that claim.

Regards, Brian Moody 
MOODY, Thomas (I8077)
 
214
Mike,
My name is Brian Moody and I am a 7th great grandson of Thomas Moody an d Ann Lawrence through their son Samuel Moody. Over the last few years , I have noticed your postings of your ancestry which includes that of Th omas Moody and Ann Lawrence descendents through their son Samuel Moody, e tc. I have been pleased with the effort you have made to support the inf ormation you have included and occasional corrections. I also see that y ou have included some research and reference to Janice McAlpine's work o n the lines. I am very familiar with Janice's work and have regular cont act with her as we share information. I greatly respect her research an d documentation. We have collaborated for several years now and are in a greement on almost all of her conclusions. The purpose of this e-mail i s to identify a couple of areas that I believe are incorrect in your reco rd as well as another one which disagrees with Janice's opinion.

I noticed that you show the birth of Samuel Moody, Jr. (son of Samuel Moo dy, and grandson of Thomas Moody and Ann Lawrence) as abt 1689 and deat h as 15 Nov 1737. I believe the birth year estimate is incorrect as wel l as the death date. According to the will of Francis Redford dated 16 Ma y 1682, Samuel Moody, Jr. was named as his "grandsono-in-law." Samuel Mo ody Jr. had to have been born before 16 May 1682 in Charles City County , Virginia in order to have been included in his step-grandfather's will . Will of Francis Redford [step-grandfather] dated 16 May 1682, recorde d 5 Dec 1693 Henrico Co, VA: Francis Redford left "one mare to grandson-i n-law [step-grandson] Samuel Moody Jr." Colonial Wills of Henrico County , VA part l 1654-1737 Abstracted & Compiled by Benjamin B Weisiger lll pa ge 457.
As to the death of Samuel Moody, Jr., it should be 15 December 1737 not N ovember. The death date recorded in the "Moody Family Book" and the "Joh n Wyatt Moody Family, Past and Present" is guessed as 15 Nov 1737 but thi s is incorrect. Their source is from a republished account in the Willia m and Mary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. V, page 242. Obit. in William and M ary Quarterly, Series 1, Vol. V, page 242. Month is undated in this entry , but one above is dated 9 Dec 1737: "Samuel Moody and another white man , going a ducking in a very small canoe in Moorcock Creek, by Chicahomin y Ferry, were upset and drowned the 15th instant." It was guessed in th e Moody Books that the month should be November. This is errant as evide nced from the original obituary in the Virginia Gazette, Personal Notice s of which I have photo copy. The original Virginia Gazette notice is i n the weekly paper dated 23 Dec, 1737 for the week from Friday, Decembe r 16 to Friday, December 23. It says: "Last Thursday the 15th Inst. Samu el Moody, and another white Man, going a Ducking in a very small Canoe i n Moorcock Creek, by Chicahominy Ferry, were over-let and both drowned. " SO HIS DEATH WAS ACTUALLY Dec 15, 1737 not November as suspected in th e MFB from the W&M Quarterly record. Library of Virginia/Digital Collecti on: Virginia Gazette, Parks, December 23, 1737.


It is Janice's opinion that there is no evidence that Samuel Moody, Jr' s son Thomas Moody (1718-1819) ever lived in Cumberland County, Virginia , but there is evidence that he was in Cumberland Parish in Lunenburg Cou nty as early as 1739 or 1749. To support that opinion, she gives the basi s as two records. (1) "The Southside Virginia Land that became MIDLOTHIAN ," by June Banks Evans (2005): "On 22 Sep 1739, William Gooch, governor o f Virginia Colony, in consideration of 11 pounds sterling/15 shillings; g ranted John Edloe a tract of 2354 acres situated "in the County of Brunsw ick on the South side of the Flatt Rock Creek and on both side of the Bea ver Pond Branch."[PB18:502] The boundary began "at a hickory in the for k between the said Flatt Rock Creek and Beaver Pond Creek and then nort h along Beaver Pond Creek to the mouth of a branch of the "Cattails" an d along various meanders and branches of Beaver Pond to a corner and alon g MOODY'S line to a branch of Flatt Rock Creek, then down the creek "to B roadnax's corner white oak at the Falls" and along his line to the beginn ing.. In 1746, this Edloe tract became in the jurisdiction of Lunenbur g County."
It was Janice's opinion that Thomas Moody must not have sold all of the 3 01 acres to Edward Broadnax on 6 December 1738 which he had inherited fro m his father. Therefore, the "Moody's Line" reference in the 1739 docume nt regarding John Edloe was referring to Thomas Moody with him having som e residue of the 301 acres he inherited from his father because the origi nal 301 acres was on Flatt Rock Creek. This conclusion is also in erro r as the following records clearly show that all of the 301 acres were so ld to Edward Broadnax. This means that the 1739 account naming "Moody's l ine" cannot be assumed to be Thomas Moody. The amount of acreage sold i s not stated in the W&M Qrtly account, but Pioneers and Cavaliers, Abstra cts of Land Patents and Grants, Volume 5, page 24 shows that Edward Broad nax patented 871 acres including the 301 acres granted Samuel Moody 10 Ju ne 1737 & by them sold to said Broadnax and patented by Broadnax 30 Jul 1 742 (Brunswick Co. Patent Book 20. p360). Also it is recorded in the Th e Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume 26, Number 2, image 6 2 &63, "Brunswick County Land Patent Book 20, Edward Broadnax, 871a, Brun swick Co., Both Sides Flatt Rock Cr., (p.359), 570a of the Tract formerl y g. Hannah Rains 28 Sep 1732, 301a, the Residue, formerly g. Samuel Mood y 10 Jun 1737 & by them sold to sd. Broadnax (p.360) 30 July 1742."
(2) Lunenburg County, Virginia Will book 4, page 29:
March 13, 1779
Philemon Russell, deceased
Division of negroes belonging to the estate of Philemon Russell, deceased :
Silas L800 to Jeffrey Russell, he paying estate L310
Abraham L800 to William Russell, he paying estate L310
Betty and her young child L670 to Phill Russell, he paying estate L180
--- L800

Nan to Molly Russell L400
and to receive for the estate 90
Bett to Jenny Russell 320
and to receive for the estate 170
Ben to Sally Russell 240
and to receive for the estate 250
Jenny to Betsey Russell 200
and to receive for the estate 290

March 13, 1749 by David Garland
Phillip Rich(?)
William Fisher
Thomas Moody
Please note that Philemon Russell died in 1779 not 1749. Part of the tra nscription uses the correct date of March 13, 1779 but the bottom uses th e date of March 13, 1749. This is the date that Janice used in her docum entation, but it is in error. The bottom line is that the earliest recor d we have of Thomas Moody being in residence in Lunenburg County, Virgini a is 1763 although there is land record of 1762 and possibly 1761.. 1763 . "Cumberland Parish--Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816 & Vestry Boo k 1746-1816." Bell, Landon C., Orig. Published Richmond, VA 1930, Reprint ed: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Greenville, SC (1995) At a Vestry he ld 30 Sep 1763, it was ordered that "processioning be done in the Precenc t of THOMAS MOODYS" and be reported March 1764 when completed. Vestry Bo ok 1746-1816, p. 402.
1763/1764. "Cumberland Parish--Lunenburg County, Virginia 1746-1816 & Ves try Book 1746-1816." Bell, Landon C., Orig. Published Richmond, VA 1930 , Reprinted: Southern Historical Press, Inc. Greenville, SC (1995) Page 5 11
1763/1764RETURNS OF PROCESSIONING in obedience to an Order Of Vestry of t he 30th of Septembr., 1763, of Cumberland Parish.
No. 1......Thomas Moodys, etc.
Land records 1761 & 1762:
1761. Lunenburg Deek Book 7, p. 200-201, item 132. "THOMAS MOODY of PGC O 22 Dec 1761 200a Lunenburg/ both sides Stoney Cr."
Page 200. Dec. 22, 1761 From William Beal of L, to Thomas Moody of the C ounty of Prince George, for 75 pounds, a certain tract of land in L on bo th sides of Stony Cr, about 200 acres b ounded by the mouth of the Sprin g Branch, it being the upper end of a tract of land granted to William At kinson for 304 acres by patent dated Nov 25, 1743 in Brunswick County no w L. Signed William (Mhis mark) Beal. Wit. James Neblitt, Frncis Neblitt , elisabeth Nelitt, Mary, the wife of William Beal, relinquished her righ t of dower to the conveyed lands. Recorded Apr. 6, 1762.
[We know from other records listed below that THOMAS MOODY (1718) had pr operty on Stoney Creek, so this is almost certainly our Thomas, but a que stion is raised about "PGCO" which means Prince George County. It is quit e likely that he also hadroperty in Prince George County, since it was cr eated from Charles City County where his father also had property, whic h he likely inherited and it could have been in PGCO.]
1762. Lunenburg County, Viorginia Deeds, 1757-1763, TLC Genealogy, Maima i Beach, Fl. 1990, page 45
Deed Book 7, page332. Aug 3, 1762 from William Bull of L, planter, to Nic holas Edmunds, merchant, of Brunswick County, for 40 pounds all that trac t of land in L on th west side of Stony Cr. containing about 227 acres, a nd bounded by Mathew Orgain, THOMAS MOODY, Parnal, the Ridge Path, Edloe , Parker. Signed William (M his mark) Bull. Wit none. Mary, the wife o f William Bull, relinquished her right of dower to the conveyed lands. R ecorded Aug 3, 1762.

The point is that I have searched the microfilm court and land records o f Lunenburg County without finding any evidence of Thomas Moody in resid ence in Lunenburg County before 1761. This refutes Janice's opinion tha t Thomas Moody could not have been the one in Cumberland County. Unlik e Janice's opinion, there is evidence that Thomas Moody was in Cumberlan d County. Please remember the (1)Dr. Thomas Moody(1759) Rev. War pensio n application of 1833 wherein he states under oath that he was born "9 No vember 1759 in Cumberland County, Virginia" and further states that h e was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia with his family when he entere d service in the Spring of 1776, (2) the belief that Dr. Thomas Moody(17 59) is the son of Thomas Moody (1718). We would expect Cumberland Count y records to corroborate his claim of birth there, and we would expect re cords to support the claim that Dr. Thomas Moody (1759) is the son of Tho mas Moody, Sr.(1718). The pension record is direct evidence and Janice' s claim that it is a mistake is only opinion and assumption.
There are few extant Cumberland County records, but there are 1758, 175 9 and 1760 Cumberland County tax lists. (Cumberland County, Virginia Tiha bles, The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 47, Number 2, Aprilo-June 2003 iss ue, pages 147-151 "Two Cumberland County Tithable Lists, 1758, 1760:" ) The 1758 list shows no Moody family. The 1759 list shows Thomas Mood y ...15 tithes. The 1760 list shows Thomas Moody...6 tithes. There wa s only one Moody family there in 1759 and in 1760 and that was the Thoma s Moody family. There is also a 1757 record of a Benjamin Harris Will wi th a Thomas Moody as witness 4 Sept. 1757 and proved by him 28 May 1759 a t court. Will Bk 1 Pg. 185 Cumberland Co, VA 1759. These are part of a b asis for the claim that Dr. Thomas Moody(1759) was the son of the Thoma s Moody in Cumberland County. These records would seem to corroborate th e declaration under oath in court by Dr. Thomas Moody in his Pension Appl ication.
Dr. Thomas Moody(1759), in his 1833 Rev. War Pension Application File, st ates he was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia with his family when h e entered service in the Spring of 1776 and that he lived in Lunenburg Co unty until about 1790 when he removed to North Carolina. This claim is a lso supported in the Pension Application by an Affidavit provided by Joh n Moody who was then living in Oglethorpe County, Georgia and who state d that he was in his 23rd year living in Lunenburg County not far from Dr . Thomas Moody and accompanied him to the Court House in 1776 where he en tered service and witnessed him marching off. Per evidence of Lunenburg t ax records listed below, it shows Thomas Moody(1718) had sons, John Mood y born 1753 and Thomas Moody, Jr. born 1759. Other Lunenburg records belo w show this Thomas Moody, Jr. lived in Lunenburg County until about 179 0 as his Pension application claims. These evidences from Lunenburg Count y as well as those from Cumberland County establish that Dr. Thomas Moody (1759) was Thomas Moody's(1718) son, Thomas Moody, Jr.(1759).
The information about Cumberland County is complicated by the Revolutiona ry War Pension Application #W.25732 of September 1832 by another Thomas M oody, Jr. (1762) of Oglethorpe County Georgia who in his 1832 applicatio n stated that he was born 1762 in Cumberland County, Virginia where he wa s living when drafted into service in the early summer of 1780. His fath er was also a Thomas Moody(1735-1797) who was married to Judith Ligon an d they lived the remainder of their lives in Cumberland County. This Tho mas Moody was the son of Henry Moody of Chesterfield County, Virginia, wh o we now know from DNA testing is also descended from Samuel Moody (1652) . Thomas (1735) is shown in 1756 tax list in Chesterfield County in th e household of his father Henry Moody. This evidence indicates he is ove r 16 and possibly not yet 21 by 1756, so he was born sometime after 173 5 and likely before 1740. He also is not likely the Thomas Moody who i s listed in the tax record of Cumberland County in 1759 with 15 tithes bu t is more likely Thomas Moody (1718). This Thomas Moody (1735) does no t show in the 1762 Chesterfield tithables list, although his father and s iblings do. This suggests he had married and removed from Chesterfield Co unty to Cumberland County by 1762 per his son’s Pension Application.
Janice believes the 1759 tax record and Benjamin Harris will of 1757 prov ed 1759 are more likely Thomas Moody son of Henry Moody. It becomes a rea l question whether Thomas Moody, son of Henry Moody, could have been witn ess to the will in September 1757. We know that Thomas Moody, son of Hen ry Moody, was resident in Chesterfield County per the tax list of 1757. C hesterfield County, Virginia Tithables, 1757, Binn's Genealogy, image # 3 3
Henry Moodie
Henry Moodie, Jnr
Thomas Moodie
Samuel Moodie
Dick, Hamblon 6
This means that Thomas Moody was still in his father's household as of Ju ne 10, 1757. He was over 16 and could have traveled and been a witness o f the Harris will in Cumberland County in September 1757, but it is mor e likely Thomas Moody 1718. We also know that Thomas Moody, son of Henr y Moody was witness to a land transaction in Chesterfield County per tran scription in November 1759. Chesterfield County, Virginia Deed Book 3, p . 566 2 November 1759. William Walthall of Chesterfield Co., to Willia m Robertson of same, for 50 pounds sterling, land bounded by said Roberts on on Upper Sappony Creek, 200 acres; being part of 400 acres formerly gr anted to Henry Walthall, father to said William, by patent 9 July 1724.
Wit: Henry Walthall, THOMAS MOODY, Christopher Bass.
Signed: William walthall Recorded May 1759? [s/b 1760]
Walthall's wife released her dower.Virginia in 1760:

Evidence also shows that Thomas Moody, believed to be the son of Henry Mo ody, was shown on the 1760 reconstructed tax lists of Chesterfield County . Virginia in 1760: A reconstructed Census, T.L.C. Genealogy, Miami, FL 1 996, 1760-VA page 229:
Moody
Thomas
Chesterfield, 33: 64, 33: 70
These same reconstructed tax lists show another Thomas Moody in Cumberlan d County:
Moody
Thomas
Cumberland, 18:159, 18: 164

This Chesterfield County tax list of 1760 indicates that a Thomas Moody , believed to be the son of Henry Moody, was in residence in Chesterfiel d County in 1760 and that another Thomas Moody was in residence in Cumber land County in 1760. If the information contained in this record is accur ate, it seems to contradict Janice's conclusion that the 1759 and 1760 ta x lists of Thomas Moody in Cumberland County was that of Thomas Moody, so n of Henry Moody. We also know that Thomas Moody, son of Henry Moody, bou ght land in Chesterfield County December of 1760. Chesterfield County, V irginia Deed Books 3&4, page 144; LDS Microfilm, page #33, 5 December 176 0, Vestry of Dale Parish, Chesterfield County for 7 pounds 10 shillings L ots in town laid off on the Glebe Land to: [among others]
Thomas Moody of Chesterfield County, #21. [Note: this sale is signed by t he minister and vestrymen.] Although this land record doesn't indicate re sidence, it does support the 1760 tax record which does indicate residenc e.

Janice counters with evidence that August 1760: John Ratcliff paid Thoma s Moody 1,405 pounds of tobacco for attendance at Chesterfield court a s a witness and for "travelling to Chesterfield." Chesterfield Co., Virg inia, Court Order Book 3, p. 70. She believes this is more likely Thoma s Moody son of Henry Moody coming from Cumberland County because it is i n Chesterfield County where Thomas Moody, son of Henry, was from. Unfort unately, this record doesn't state where the referenced Thomas Moody wa s coming from and if from Cumberland County, it could just as well have b een Thomas Moody 1718.

In 1761 in Chesterfield County, Thomas Moody (son of Henry Moody) was a w itness to a deed transaction of Samuel Hatcher. Chesterfield County, Vir ginia Deed Book 4, Page 546-547, LDS Film 30888, Transcribed by Cecil Q L arsen
This Indenture made this sixth day of February in the year of our lord Ch rist one thousand seven hundred and Sixty one between Samuel Hatcher of D ale parish in Chesterfield county of the one part and Samuel Hatcher of t he parish and county aforesaid of the other part.....Seal the day and yea r first above written.
Samuel Hatcher
Signed sealed and delivered In presence of
Thos Moody
Edward Branch
Henry Moody jun
At a court held for Chesterfield county February 1761
This deed from Samuel Hatcher to Samuel Hatcher was proved by the Oaths o f Thomas Moody Edward Branch and Henry Moody junr witnesses thereto and o rdered to be recorded.
Test. Ben Watkins ___(?)


You can draw your own conclusions from all this, but Janice and I are cur rently trying to figure out what all these evidences actually mean. We s till don't know everything that would define these issues. I just recentl y got the 1758 and 1760 Cumberland County tax list. I am still trying t o get a 1761 and a 1764 Cumberland County tax list which I understand a re archived at the Library of Virginia. We also don't know for sure whe n Thomas Moody, son of Henry, was married and moved to Cumberland County . Thomas Moody's (1735)son Thomas (1762) states he was born in 1762 in Cu mberland County. We, therefore, would expect evidence to support that cl aim. We also have just as valid the claim of Thomas Moody 1759 son of Th omas Moody 1718 that he was born in Cumberland County in 1759. There i s evidence to support that claim.

Regards, Brian Moody 
MOODY, Henry (I8076)
 
215
Nathaniel Wheeler Collinsworth is the Father-in-law's full name.
His middle name must have been used by mistake in the 1930 census.
1930 US Census New Plymouth, Payette, Idaho
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XH69-RFX
Charles Linder Head M abt 1887 43 Married KS MO MO
Edna Linder Wife F abt 1888 42 Married KS IN IN
Wheeler C Linder Son M abt 1916 14 Single ID KS KS
Nathaniel Wheeler Father-in-law M abt 1850 80 Married IN KY MD
Nancy Wheeler Mother-in-law F abt 1851 79 Married IN IN IN 
Source (S689)
 
216
next door is Daniels parents James and Catherine Linder
1860 US Census Canaan, Morrow, Ohio
July 13, 1860
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCLH-YTT
1049 1036 James Linder M abt 1787 73 Virginia
Catherine Linder F abt 1794 66 Pennsylvania
Charity Linder F abt 1833 27 Ohio
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCLH-YT1
1050 1037 Daniel Linder M abt 1838 22 Ohio
Ann E Linder F abt 1834 26 Ohio
Mary Linder F abt 1859 9m Ohio
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCLH-YT1
Daniel Linder M abt 1838 22 Ohio
Ann E Linder F abt 1834 26 Ohio
Mary Linder F abt 1859 9m Ohio 
Source (S407)
 
217
Nora is living in Rice Lake in 1906, same as in the 1905 Wisconsin State Census
Wisconsin, Births and Christenings, 1826-1926
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XRXR-YV4
Name: Darcy Mckusky
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 19 Feb 1906
Birthplace: Rice Lake, Barron, Wisconsin
Race: White
Father's Name: Henry Mckusky
Father's Birthplace: Wisconsin
Mother's Name: Nora Windherst
Mother's Birthplace: Iowa 
Source (S1658)
 
218
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZL6-QJ3
Name Edward R. Richlin
Event Type Marriage
Event Date 19 May 1891
Event Place Lucas, Ohio, United States
Spouse's Name Carolina Muller 
MILLER, Carrie C. (I16892)
 
219
Page 206
4 THOMAS2 HOYT (John1), of Salisbury and Amesbury, b. 1641; worked for
Walter Taylor, "shipwright," in 1664; m. 1st, ab. 1667, (46) MARY2 BROWN;
2d, Nov. 29, 1689[A], ['90 A Sm], (2) MARY ASH. He was of S. 1670-80; af t er
that of A.; oath al. and fid. at S. Dec., 1677. He d. Jan. 3, 1690-1[A ] ; adm. est.
March 31, 1691. Wid. Mary m. ab. 1692, (4) JAMES HALL. Children:

25 I THOMAS,3 b. (???); m. 1st, May 22, 1689, ELIZABETH HUNTINGTON;
2d, Nov. 18, 1722, wid. MARY (JEWELL) BARNARD. +
26 II WILLIAM,3 b. Oct. 19, 1670[S]; d. Oct. 29, 1670[S].
27 III EPHRAIM,3 b. Oct. 16, 1671[S]; m. 1st, April 25, 1695[D Hm], Han n ah
Godfrey of Hm.; 2d, Aug. 12, 1736, another Han. Godfrey; 3d,
Sep. 4, 1738, Elizabeth Macrest [or Macree]; res. Hm. Falls ; d . 1741
or '2. 9 chil. His son Benj.4 was ancestor of the "Worcester Co.
Branch." [Hoyt Gen., p. 198.] 
HOYT, Thomas (I4493)
 
220
Posted By: Graham Peaslee
Email:
Subject: Joseph's origins in England before 1635
Post Date: June 03, 2001 at 00:55:27
Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/peaslee/messages/172.html
Forum: Peaslee Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/peaslee/

My father and I have done some research on our original ancestor's orig i ns in England, and more importantly we found a couple people in Englan d w ho were much better at looking up old records than we were. Over th e pas t 10 years we have put tgether a set of circumstantial bits of evid enc e that point to Joseph Peaslee's lineage in England prior to 1635. Th er e are several assumptions we have to make and about 20 years of his li f e still missing from documents before his arrival in New England, bu t I t hink this is a much more plausible explaination than the current Lo rd Cal vert connection that one sees on the web several places. While a W illia m Peasley did marry Anne Calvert, he is much more likely to be dire ctly r elated to a southern branch of the Peasley/Peaslee/Peaseley famil y that s ettled in the Virginia colonies as early as 1629. Lord Calvert a nd his fa mily being strong catholics, it is unlikely that the protestan t Joseph (w ho was fined for preaching without a license in Boston aroun d 1640) woul d be a close relative...perhaps a first or second cousin a t best. I offe r the following set of stories written as our best guess a t the moment o f our ancestry in England. Sorry it is so long-winded, bu t it does make f or interesting reading I hope...

=============
While the connection between the original Joseph and ancestors in Englan d /Wales has never been absolutely confirmed, my father and I have stumbl e d upon some rather convincing evidence that he was the son of a Rober t an d Jane Peaslee, born in Chipping-Sodbury, Gloucestershire, England , aroun d 1598. The summary of some of our records is listed here:

JOHN PEASLEE, SADDLER OF BRISTOL

The Bristol Records Office has documents [1] showing that one Jo h n Peasly/Peasley/Peaseley, saddler of Bristol, took a number of apprent ic es in the decade 1532-42. For about the first half of this period, hi s wi fe was Agnes; later it wh. Ten years later, in 1551/52, a saddle r i n Chipping Sodbury named Robert Peasley sent his son Christopher [1 ] a s apprentice to an apothecary. Subsequent saddlers in Chipping Sodbur y we re William Peaslie, his son (another) Robert Peasley, and his son Jo sep h Peasley who was born around 1600 and is likely to be the Joseph wh o emi grated to New England in 1630-40.

Arguments can be made [2] that the first Robert Peasley in Chippi n g-Sodbury came originally from Hambrook in Winterbourne parish, wher e h e probably had a younger brother John. No direct link to William, th e nex t saddler in Chipping Sods now known; but it seems reasonable t o s uppose that he was a fairly close relative - say, either a son or nep he w (Robert of Hambrook apparently had at least one other brother, Thoma s).

Since saddlery in Chipping Sodbury seems to have been such a clo s e family affair, one is tempted to wonder whether there was a similar l in k to the vigorous saddler John Peasley of Bristol. In this connection , i t should be noted thatn Peseley appears in the records of Sturde n Ma nor [3] as a tenant who died in about 1562 without repairing his cow- hou se.

The most likely scenario with such linkage probably assigns the B r istol saddler John to be the younger brother of the original Robert, fa th er of Robert of Chipping Sodbury and his brother John. This older Joh n o f Hambrook could have bn about 1485 and been well established in B ri stol by 1530: in fact, successful enough to attract his nephew Rober t t o his service. In about 1530 Robert struck out for himself, first ret urni ng to Hambrook/Winterbourne and then proceeding to Chipping Sodbury . Th e death of John's first wife Agnes in about 1535 suggests an advance d ag e for those times, and John himself no longer appears in the record s afte r 1542.

In this account the John Peseley in Sturden Manor appears as Robe r t of Chipping Sodbury's younger brother.

THE PEASLEES OF CHIPPING-SODBURY

The survey "Men and Armour for Gloucestershire in 1608 "include s f or Chipping-Sodbury one Robert Peasely, sadler, with a notation to sh ow t hat his age was nearer 20 than 40 years. Also listed is John William s, me rcer, with an age notatser to 40 than 20.

Robert's will in the PCC is dated May, l6l7: probate granted to w i dow Jane the following February. Widow Jane herself left a PCC will dat e d May, 1618: probate granted to son Joseph in May, 1619. Since Joseph w a s the only son, this seqf wills indicates that he had not attaine d th e age of majority (21) by May, 1619, but he probably was 21 by Februa ry , 1618; hence he was born in 1597/98.

Robert's will is unusually explicit and orderly in distributing h i s property: to the benefit of wife Jane "during her naturall life". The re after son Joseph inherits the shop with responsibilities to his 4 sist er s - Jane, Elizabeth, Gernd Sarah. The detailed devolvement of Robe rt' s leaseholds among his daughters makes it clear that they are liste d i n birth order. The only specific date now known is in the IGI: Elizab eth e Peaslye, daughter of Robte Peaslye, christened in Chipping Sodbur y on 1 0 May, 1607. One can then guess approximate birth years of 1602, 1 610 an d 1613 for Jane, Gertrude and Sarah.

The last known reference to Joseph Peaslee in England is from "T h e Continuing Story of the Sodburys" (1972), a privately duplicated acco un t published and distributed by the author, Mr. P. A. Couzens. On pag e 10 4 appears the statement,me time prior to this year [1628] there h a d been premises in High Street........at Sodbury occupied by Robert Pea s lie and his son Joseph who were sadlers. Now however they pass to Joh n Wi lliams, who has a wife Jane and a daughter Sara, and whose busines s is th at of a mercer." This is the strongest suggestion in print that t his Jose ph Peaslee had picked up and left the Chipping-Sodbury area arou nd 1628 d espite the fact that his family had resided there for 100 year s …all abou t 10 years before a Joseph Peaslee shows up in New England . We contend th at Joseph resurfaces in the records of the Massachusett s Colony between 1 638 and 1641, along with a wife Mary and 3 daughter s - Mary, Jane and Eli zabeth. He now is listed as a husbandman.

Sister Jane was singled out in her mother's will to receive the b e st of the widow's household goods, presaging her marriage soon. This pr es umably occurred between 1620 and the passage of the shop premises to J an e as the wife of John W, mercer. If this was the man mentioned i n th e Gloucester muster of 1608, he must have been some 30 years older th a n his wife; it seems more likely that he was a son who had inherited bo t h the name and the business.

Elizabeth was most likely a teenager when sister Jane was marrie d , Joseph having departed Chipping Sodbury at that time or before. She m a y have been sent to "help out" among the numerous Peaslee cousins and t he ir friends in Thornbury.abeth Peaseley/Peaslie witnessed baptism s o f Charles and Judith Tayer in 1635 and 1640.

Gertrude was less fortunate: buried in Chipping Sodbury in 1632 , s he was at most in her early 20's. Presumably she had been left with s om e family in Chipping Sodbury, perhaps one named in the wills of Rober t an d his wife Jane. This isr interesting connection with the Joseph P e aslee who showed up in New England. The original immigrant Joseph had f o ur daughters and a son, and the names of the four daughters were Mary , Ja ne, Elizabeth and Sarah. Mary was his wife's name, and the three oth er na mes of his daughters, although common names for that period, were t he exa ct same three names of Joseph's surviving sisters.

ROBERT PEASLEE,* JR.,+ FROM HAMBROOK, GLOUCESTERSHIRE

The Military Survey of Gloucestershire in 1522 [1] lists for th e t ithing of Hambrook in the parish of Winterbourne, about 10 miles nort h-ea st of Bristol, the following entries among others: Robert Pesele y , and separately Robert Peseleyon John . The immediate reading of thi s is a father Robert and two sons - Robert , Jr., who is of age (21 in th ose times) and John who is not, but suffici ently mature to bear arms. Si nce their separation in age was probably onl y a few years, we can take R obert, Jr., as born about 1500 and John a bi t later.

The Bristol Records Office [2] shows that one Robert Peasley acqu i red a holding in Sturden, one of the 3 estates in Winterbourne, jointl y w ith wife Alice and son Richard. The timing and location agree well wi th t he supposition that thihe same Robert, Jr.

A will is extant in the Gloucestershire Record Office from one Ro b ert Peysley who died in 1578 in Thornbury, about 20 miles north of Bris to l, leaving to brother Thomas his "wearing clothes", to son Ambrose hi s sh op tools (but no othery), and "to Alyce my wyffe one hand-spinne r w hich is at my wyffe's..." Alice Peasely is also listed [2] as an indiv id ual leaseholder in Sturden in 1554. Again the times and places invite i d entification with Robert, Jr. His wife outlived him, and there is som e s uggestion that they were separated years earlier.

The Apprentice Rolls from the Bristol Records Office [3] includ e o ne Christopher Peasley, son of Robert, saddler of Sodbury, apprentice d t o John Sprynt, apothecary of Bristol in 1551/2. The Hampshire Record s Off ice has wills [4] datedom one Christopher , apothecary o f Andover , and one dated 1625 from his son Michael, which incidentally re marks th at his father was born in Chipping Sodbury. If his apprenticeshi p starte d at age 13, Christopher was born about 1538. Again it is perfect ly cons onant with the information above to suppose that Robert, Jr., wa s that s addler of Chipping Sodbury - located about 10 miles northeast o f Hambroo k and about 15 miles east of Thornbury.

* Spellings in this era were a function of the particular scribe and va r y capriciously; it seems likely that even if the individual knew how t o s pell his name, that could be ignored, especially in dictation of will s fr om a deathbed.

+ Distinctions like Jr., III, for different generations with the same na m e were a much later innovation. We use them here to separate 4 generati on s of Robert Peaslees.

Original document not seen, so present spelling used.

From these scraps of information some outline of the man himsel f c an be drawn: apparently of more than usual energy and ambition, bot h wit h regards to property and social status. Names like Christopher an d Ambro se sound rather upscalerld of Roberts and Johns. His energy is s u ggested not only by his repeated change of domicile but by the fact th a t he may have fathered as many as 5 sons. A Robert is on recor d [4] a s present in Andover, Hampshire as early as 1582 and was buried th ere i n 1612. The will of Christopher's son Michael makes gifts to "the ch ildr en of Uncle Robert" who thus becomes a candidate for the family posit io n of Robert III in modern terms. In addition, there was a William Peese l ey renting premises in Sturden Manor in 1573 [5] who can be connecte d t o the saddlery in Chipping Sodbury [6] and was possibly an additiona l so n of Robert, Jr.

It is intriguing to attempt a timetable for this family. The elde s t son would traditionally have borne his father's name, so a sequence l ik e the following suggests itself: Robert(1528), William(1531), Richar d (15 34 - maybe died young,ever reappears), Christopher(1538), and Amb r ose(1540+). In the early 1540's, the family would all have been togeth e r in Chipping Sodbury; their subsequent wide dispersal suggests enterpr is ing spirit and possible conflicts at home.

REFERENCES

[1] Ed. R. W. Hoyle, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, l 9 93.
[2] Documents AC/M18/6 & 7.
[3] Calendar of the Bristol Apprentice Book, Part I, BRO 1949.
[4] Reported by Mrs. Helene P. Cairns of Tipperary, Ireland.
[5] Bristol Records Office, document AC/M18/4.
[6] A separate treatment of William Peaslee follows.


WILLIAM PEASLEE OF CHIPPING SODBURY


The will of one William Peaslie of Chipping Sodbury is extant i n t he Gloucestershire Records Office, dated 1599. In it he leaves the wa re s of his shop, plus some housebuilding material, to the only son menti one d in the will. That the slt in harness and was presumably a saddle r y is indicated by an instruction to pay 15s to the lorimer, who was a f a bricator of metal parts essential for harnesses.

How does he relate to Robert, Jr., from Hambrook, who appears t o h ave been a saddler in Chipping Sodbury in 1540-50 at least? No recor d o f direct connection is currently known, but circumstantial evidence i ndic ates a close relationshi, William was probably a son or nephew:

1) His date of death is consonant with those of Robert. Jr.'s so n s Christopher and Robert III in Andover, Hampshire;

2) he named his (apparently) only son Robert (here Robert IV);

3) he followed the lead of Robert, Jr., who was the first Peasl e e family member of the Hambrook-Chipping Sodbury area known to have le f t a will;

4) Robert IV named his first two daughters Jane and Elizabeth, wh i ch are the daughters' names mentioned in Robert, Jr.'s will. This is n o t a very strong point, as these were the most popular women's names o f th e day.

The simplest scenario at Chipping Sodbury would have been for Robert, Jr . , to have taken a young family member as apprentice to the saddler's tr ad e. Initially this arrangement may have been amicable, but it is not cl ea r whether it remained so through the eventual split of Robert, Jr., t o Th ornbury with William remaining in Chipping Sodbury.

Indeed, the quarter century 1550-75 reads as a rather turbulent o n e for the family of Robert, Jr. Before this time the family had been to ge ther in Chipping Sodbury for a decade or more but appeared rapidly t o bre ak up afterwards. Son Cher went to Bristol and never looked bac k ; wife Alice was perhaps planning a retreat to Sturden (1554); some yea r s before 1578 Robert, Jr., and son Ambrose decamped to Thornbury for re as ons unknown but perhaps relating to social advancement. Robert III an d Wi lliam could have been left to run the shop in Chipping Sodbury; bu t Rober t III later left to join his brother Christopher in Andover.

This picture looks as if the breakup was not without acrimony - p e rhaps Robert, Jr., had acquired recusant notions that most of his fami l y resisted. Under those circumstances it may be plausible that the rent a l of premises in Sturdeny Willyam Peeseley in 1573 was a retrea t by th e same William from the quarrels in Chipping Sodbury. He would hav e retu rned to Chipping Sodbury when the conflict was resolved in a way th at le ft the saddlery there to him.

Whether William was son or nephew to Robert, Jr., he was in eith e r case the grandson of the senior Robert Peseley of Hambrook listed i n th e survey of 1522. That Robert - who must have been born about 147 5 - thu s appears as the great-grndfather of Joseph Peaslee who lived i n M assachusetts, in the decades 1640-60.

=======================

Since this is rather long and not the clearest, I have put together a ch a rt of the best guess of the four generations previous to Joseph:

#-4
Robert

Children:
Thomas b. ~1470
Robert b. ~1475 m. Alice d?
John b.~1485 (sadler of Bristol 1532-1542) d.1562?
m.1 Agnes m.2 Edith

#-3
Robert Peaslee, Jr (of Hambrook) b. ~1475 d. >1522
m. Alice
Children:
Richard ? b. <1500
Robert, 3rd. b.~1500 (has sons Christopher & Ambrose)
John b. ~1505
Jane
Elizabeth
William? b. >1520?

#-2
William Peaslee b. >1520? d. 1599 Chipping-Sodbury
m. ?

Children:
Robert b. ~1580

#-1
Robert Peaslee b.~1580 d. May-1617 (sadler of Chipping-Sodbury)
m. Jane ? b. ? d. May-1619
Children:
1. Joseph b. ~1598
2. Jane b. ~1602
3. Elizabeth b. 10-May-1607 Chipping-Sodbury
4. Gartres (Gertude) b. ~1610 d. 1632 Chipping-Sodbury
5. Sarah b. ~1613

#0
Joseph Peaslee b. ~1598 Chipping-Sodbury? d. 3-Dec-1660 (Amesbury, MA)
m1. (Jane Severance)??) d. <1635
Children:
1. Jane b. ~1626 (England) m. John Davis 1646
2. Mary b. ~1628 (England) m. Henry Sayward ~1654
3. Elizabeth b. ~1630 (England) m. John Collins? 165 2 ? m . Nathan Gould? m. Peter Brewer?

m2. Mary Johnson ~1635 (England or Wales) d. < Sep-1694 (Haverhill, MA)

4. Sarah b. 20-Sep-1642 (Haverhill, MA) m.1 Thomas Bernard 1664
m.2 Thomas Hoyt >1706
5. Joseph b. 9-Sep-1646 (Haverhill, MA) m.1 Ruth Barna r d m. Mary Davis 
Agnes (I4938)
 
221
Prepared October 14, 2009, by Janice McAlpine, 2345 Oleander Street, Bato n Rouge, Louisiana 70806. E-mail: macalpage@cox.net

Temperance, wife of Michael Cadet Young, born about 1712, probably in Vi rginia, died after 1782, probably in North Carolina or Tennessee.

Based on the birth of their first child in October 1731, I assume Tempera nce married Michael Cadet Young about 1730/1731. If she was 18 when sh e married, she would have been born about 1712/1713. It is possible tha t she actually was a little bit younger than 18 at the time of her marria ge.

Temperance outlived her husband and, according to a letter dated April 1 6 , 1782, from Legros Young to his brother Thomas, she was alive as lat e as February 1782. In his letter, LeGros reported, "David More and wif e and our poor mother is living on the Wataugar [next word hard to read , perhaps River] I heard a trew acount of them from one of my neighbors , James Taylor, who saw them and is living on his plantation. He gives m e a very good account of them. Left them on the furst [sic] of Februar y last. Says that they were all well and likât [sic] their [word unreadab le]" (Kennedy Collection, copy in paper file.)

There was a David Moore in the Watauga Territory early. Perhaps he was t he same person mentioned in the letter. There is no explanation for wh y Temperance was with David More and no hint as to who he might have been . Did Temperance marry for a second time to Davidâs father? Was Davi d a grandson? A brother? (Notes on David Moore below.)

For what it is worth, the only “More” I have found with any connectio n to MCY was in 1728 in Henrico County. On August 3, 1728, MCY witnesse d a deed with Mark Moor and George Hunt Moore. (Henrico County, Virginia . Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 195-196.)

Most on-line researchers list two wives for Michael Cadet Young, the firs t Martha Saddler/Sadler, whom he is said to have married abt 1723, and t he second Temperance, whom he is said to have married abt. 1740. Marth a is usually listed as the mother of sons Francis, Henry, William, Jame s , Benjamin, Thomas and Legros. Temperance is only listed as the mothe r of Michael, Jr. This "information" comes from Walter Jorgensen Young' s book, The Young Family of Bristol, (1937), but it does not fit with th e facts.

Temperance is the only wife of whom we have any record. Temperance was l isted as Francis Cadet Youngâs mother in his 1731 birth record. (The Vest ry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribe d and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898. ) In a Brunswick Co., Virginia, deed dated 25 November 1755, Temperanc e Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cade t Young Sr. to Buckner Stith. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Or der Book 5, p. 503.) Michael Cadet Young, Jr.'s, 1762 will listed Tempera nce as “my mother Temperance Young.” (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Wil l Book 4, pt.2,198-(278) Will of Michael Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Paris h 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.) There is absolutely no evidenc e that Michael Cadet Young married before about 1730 or that his wife wa s named Martha.

The primary source for the name âMarthaâ€appears to have been Walter J. Y oungâs book. According to The Young Family of Bristol, p. 57, earlier fa mily histories listed Temperance as Michael Cadet Young's only wife. See , e.g., Genealogy of the Cowles Families in America, Calvin D. Cowles, 1 9 29, Vol. I. page 395, "[Temperance Young, daughter of Thomas Cadet Yo ung, was] the granddaughter of Michael Cadet and Temperance (Sadler) Youn g of Brunswick Co., Virginia." Walter rejected this stating, "records sh ow that Col. Thomas Saddler had a dau. named Martha, none named Temperanc e. Martha d. about 1740 at birth of Benjamin & Temperance was the secon d wife." (It is interesting to note that at page 6 in his book Walter Yo ung says that Martha was the daughter of John Saddler, Gent. So much fo r consistency!)

Even though I am sure that Michael Cadet Young did not marry a Martha Sad dler about 1723, there appears to have been a family relationship with Th omas Sadler and his wife Rebecca Featherstone. Thomas Sadler and Micha e l Cadet Young were listed together on a number of land transactions i n Brunswick Co., VA and there are at least two letters in the Kennedy Col lection that refer to Thomas and Rebecca Featherstone Sadler as "uncle an d aunt" or âuncle and family.” One is the April 28, 1792, letter fro m William and Susannah Gill to Susannah’s father Thomas Cadet Young an d step-moth er Lucy. That letter says, âold uncle and aunt Sadler is wel l also but poor Featherston is in a low state of health. . . .” Feathe rstone was the son of Thomas Sadler and Rebecca Featherstone. (See separa te notes on Thomas Sadler.)

The second letter was written by Temperanceâs son John Young on Decembe r 10th 1792. It says, âI heard from uncle Sadler and his famaly [sic] s o me few weeks past. The old people are still alive. Featherston has som ething risen on his nose and is likely to kill him.âJohn’s letter is es pecially interesting because, if Thomas Sadler and Rebecca Featherstone w ere Johnâs uncle and aunt, they had to have been on the maternal side. S o Temperance was likely either a Sadler or a Featherstone.

The Sadler family was Quaker and instrumental in forming new Quaker congr egations in Brunswick County. Featherstone Sadler represented Ward’s P reparatory Meeting at Black Water Monthly Meeting in 1784, but was disown ed in 1803 for involvement in slavery. (Encyclopedia of American Quake r Genealogy (Hinshaw) vol. VI, Virginia, pp. 120, 140) Temperance was a n unusual name in the South except in Quaker families. This is another i ndication that Temperance might have been a Sadler.

If I had to guess, I would say that Temperance and Thomas Sadler were sib lings and that their father was named Thomas Sadler. MCY and Temperance n amed their first son Francis after his paternal grandfather, Francis. I f MCY and Temperance followed standard naming patterns, their second s o n would have been named after his maternal grandfather. In this case , MCY and Temperance named their second son Thomas. In addition, Thoma s Sadler (Jr?) named his first son Thomas, probably after the childâs pat ernal grandfather. Unfortunately, despite these clues, the Sadler connect ion remains pure speculation.

* * * *
For further investigation only:

1787 Wilkes Co NC Tax Lists
- Inhabitants Numbered in Capt. GORDON'S District [Wilkes County, NC]
Page 7
James Taylor 1 1 2 - -

Watauga River, 60 mi (97 km) long, rising in the Blue Ridge Mts., NW N.C. , and flowing NW to the south fork of the Holston River near Kingsport , T enn. Settlement on the river began in 1768.

Elizabethton and Carter County, originally known as the Watauga Settleme n t, were first settled in 1769. Located on the Watauga River and centere d around the Sycamore Shoals river crossing, this was the first of four p ermanent settlements located west of the Appalachian Mountains. Carter Co unty was established in 1796 when Tennessee achieved statehood.


State of Franklin Petitioners - 1787- From North Carolina State Record s , Vol. 22, pp. 705-714.
List of residents of the State of Franklin who petitioned for release fro m all obligations, taxations, and duties to the North Carolina government : [among many others]
Alexander Moore, Anthony Moore, David Moore, Joseph Moore, Moses Moore, W illiam Moore

HISTORICAL CHRONOLOGY JOHN D. CHISHOLM 1730-1794
Discusses the Watauga Settlement
September 18-21, 1795
Durham relates the commissioning of David Moore by John Chisholm to buil d a flat-bottomed river boat for Governor Blount to carry War Departmen t goods from Knoxville to the Chickasaw and the Choctaw, and for Moore t o pilot the boat. (9, p. 236)

Articles of agreement, 1794 Oct. 12, Knoxville, [Te nnessee] / [signed by] David Moore and William Blount, Governor of Tennes see 
Temperance (I634)
 
222
Re: Flynn, Laughlin 1718 Virginia
Posted by: Bob Cawly cawl@aol.com
Date: June 30, 1998 at 17:51:43
In Reply to: Flynn, Laughlin 1718 Virginia by Gina
http://genforum.genealogy.com/flynn/messages/64.html

Laughlin Flinn Sr and three sons came to Va in 1718. The
three sons were Laughlin, Collumb, Daniel (or Patrick)....Patrick
is either the son or brother. Laughlin Sr father was Thomas Flinn
who married Mary Laughlin in 1660 in Wexford. Thomas was born in
1620. Laughlin Flinn Sr died in 1731, his son Laughlin in 1758, Daniel
died in 1737 in Kent Co Md, and Collumb in 1737 in Bath Co NC. Patrick
died in 1781 in Caswell Co. The flinns are believed to befrom Ulster
and Thomas' father was Edmund Flinn. 
FLYNN, Edmund (I7557)
 
223
Robert Fiske was a wheelwright, a highly skilled and esteemed trade. It
is posible that he is the Robert Fiske who was taxed thirteen shilling on
thirteen pounds of goods in 1545.

Robert Fiske and Sibilla/Sibil Gold are the 9th great grandparents of
President Calvin Coolidge.

Robert FISKE was born about 1521 in Of Fesingfield & St. James, South El m ham, Suffolk, England.(1021) He died before 28 Jul 1602.(1022) Source: Fi ske and Fisk Family; Frederick C. Pierce; 1896; p. 39 The Fiske Famil y ; NEHGR, vol. 88, pp. 265-26 Robert Fiske was of Fessingfield and St . J ames, South Elmham, Suffolk. By trade he was a wheelwright. His wil l wa s dated 10 Apr. 1590 and proved 28 Jul. 1602 at Metfield, Suffolk , by hi s sons Goeffrey (or Jeffrey) and Eliezar, the executors named i n the wil l. He married Sibilla (Gold) Barbor, and secondly Joan _____ , who was bu ried at St. James, South Elmham, 3 Aug. 1587. He was of F essingfield a s early as 1554, the baptism of his son Richard being reco rded there o n 16 Jul. 1554 and that of his son Eleazar on 31May1556. Th e records o f his eldest son, William, and his other children have not b een found. I t was probably soon after the baptism of his son Eleazar th at he moved t o St. James, South Elmham. He fled for religions's sake t o Geneva in th e days of Queen Mary, but returned later. He died at St . James. His wil l was dated 10 April 1590 and was proved 28 Jul 1600. In his will he m entioned his eldest son William Fiske to whom he left his tenement calle d Hoves in the parish of St. James, his daughter Eliz abeth, "now" the wi fe of Robert Barnard, his wife Elizabeth, and his so ns Thomas, Eliezar , and Jefferie. Parents: Richard FISKE. He was marrie d to Sybil (Gould ) , Mrs. BARBER in 1549 in England.(165) Children were : William FISKE, Je ffery FISKE, Richard FISKE, Eleazer FISKE, Elizabet h FISKE, Thomas FISKE. 
FISKE, Robert (I2660)
 
224
Source: Family information copied from the book,
"The Life and Times of Alonzo Hamilton Packer and his wife Lydia Ann Park er"
Compiled by John A. Freestone
Page 26-28
Alonzo Hamilton Packer was born in Nauvoo just 8 days before the Cornerst one for the Nauvoo Temple was put in place. Just three years later in 184 4 the Prophet Joseph Smith was murdered by the mob.

The following is taken from the life story of Jonathan Taylor Packer in o rder to document just where Alonzo was during these years.

Avilda lived until the 7th of January 1893. She died at the home of her d aughter, Sonora. (This story is affectionally dedicated to our little MOT HER, Charlotte Beryl "Lottie" (Packer) Freestone, whose life was rich wit h the true spirit of our early pioneers.)
(Our thanks to Cousin Lee Crandall who has worked faithfully as a typis t to cut the stencils to make this story available to all our cousins.)

Brigham Young was chosen (1847) the new president of the Church. Under hi s leadership the Saints worked feverishly to finish the Nauvoo temple. O n December l0th, 1845, the temple was opened for endowments. Mobs force d its closing February 7th 1846. During those two months, however, abou t 2,000 saints received their endowments. Jonathan and Avilda were amon g the faithful who were privileged to receive their endowments on the 6t h of February 1846, just the day before it was closed.
Life was uncertain from then on in Nauvoo. Brigham Young and the Saints w ere busy preparing for the great exodus. Jonathan and Avilda knew that th e time was at hand when they would have to again give up the home they ha d worked so hard to obtain. Jonathan's time was consumed building a wago n and disposing of the property to the best advantage possible. Avilda wa s busy deciding issues, sorting clothes and packing necessities. One stor y of these necessities handed down to us is the story of a bag of potat o eyes which Avilda had very carefully cut from her potatoes to take wit h them for seed. During their long journey, the eyes became as hard as ro cks, but to their great astonishment they grew into fine potatoes when pl anted in the great Salt Lake Valley. Jonathan and Avilda entered the grea t Salt Lake Valley on the 31st of August 1848) about a year after Brigha m Young had proclaimed, "It is enough. This is the right place) drive on . " They arrived 16 days ahead of their particular company. The trip, alt hough hard, was made without further incident. Avilda was expecting her f ourth child. William was born while they lived in Pioneer Fort on the 26t h of October 1848. He was the first white child born in that fort.
It was this year (1858), that Johnson's Army threatened to destroy the Sa ints in Utah. Those men living in polygamy were forced to hide out or b e persecuted. These were the times that tried men's souls. It also trie d their stability, their courage and their faith. It was in this year (18 58) on the 19th of April that Lavern Sonora was born to Avilda. Lavern wa s born in a tent where her mother, Avilda, and Jonathan were camped. The y were then on their way to Mexico to escape the persecution dealt thos e living in polygamy. However, after a few weeks camp there, they change d their minds about going to Mexico and decided to turn back to their hom e in Brigham City.
Christiana (one of the wives of Jonathon, Alonzos father) died on the 17t h of December 1892 in Brigham City--just nine years after Jonathan left f or Arizona. (Safford)
Avilda who lived with her doughter Sonora from that time on came to Arizo na with her daughter and family, along with Alonzo and William and thei r families.

"The Life and Times of Alonzo Hamilton Packer and his wife Lydia
Ann Parker" Compiled by John A. Freestone
Page 31-34

CONSTRUCTION OF THE TEMPLE BEGINS

Alonzo was privileged to witness the building of the Salt Lake Temple. H e relates the following incident as he was watching the laying of the sto nes for the Temple wall. "A workman was having trouble making one of th e stones fit into place, when he said 'Damn this stone!' Brigham Young, s tanding nearby, heard the remark and said, 'Brother, take that stone ou t and replace it with another. We do not want any stone that has been dam ned put in our Temple wall'"

Alonzo related this story to his grandson, George E. Freestone, saying , " You may want to tell this sometime in later years."

This story is a clear indication that Alonzo had a keen sense of humor , a quality needed to endure the hardships of pioneer life. Indeed, a sen se of humor can always bring a feeling of relief into anyone's life. Thro ughout his life he often manifested his appreciation of good humor wit h a spontaneous outburst of laughter, a characteristic inherited by his g randson, George. However, under situations of great stress or vexation, h e was known to have used his most vile expression of disgust by saying "B y grab." That was almost as bad as Grandpa Thomas Freestone's expression , "Thunderation", or great-grandson David Freestone's "Garbage!" I also h ad an assortment of expressions to use at vexing times, but I feel it i s the better part of wisdom not to mention any of them at this time

LIFE IN BRIGHAM CITY

The Packer family's first move from Salt Lake City was northward to Brig h am City when Alonzo was about 17 years old. A description of the plac e at the time the family arrived there is as follows: "..sagebrush, bunc h grass, no bridges. The vegetation was sparse, and the brush showed sign s of having been torn by something passing through."

Although the exact date of the family moving to Brigham City is not known , it can be definitely established that they were there before 1858. Ver y little is known of Alonzo's activities during his early youth. However , he does tell with pride of seeing his father marching as a major at t h e head of the militia with the historic sword from the Battle of Crooke d River in his hand. This military unit was organized in Box Elder Count y for the purpose of safeguarding against hostile Indians and Johnston' s Army, the latter being an army sent by the United States government t o put down a supposed rebellion by the Saints in Utah.

A HISTORIC SWORD

The aforementioned sword was given to Alonzo by his father at a later tim e, but its history appropriately belongs here. Following is a copy of a n ews article prepared by Alonzo and published in the Deseret News.

"I read with great interest the correspondence from old timers, as I am m ore acquainted with all these incidents they are the more interesting . I have an old relic which if deemed worthy can be placed among the man y that will be on exhibition at the Jubilee. I have in my possession a sw ord that the late Judge Holbrook in Bountiful, Utah, used in a hand to ha nd conflict in the Battle of Crooked River. It was in that battle that Ap ostle David W. Patton fell a martyr to the cause of truth. After the batt le, Mr. Holbrook discovered he had made a niche in the edge of this swor d . This niche yet remains. I prize this sword above anything I possess . On reflecting back to the parade ground at Brigham City, Utah, when m y fat her, Jonathan T. Packer, as a major, with this sword in hand marchi ng at the head of the Box Elder Militia, always brings to me a pleasant r emem brance of my father now dead."

"I was born April 14th, 1841, in Nauvoo; crossed the Plains with my paren ts when but seven years old, walking the entire distance firom Winter Qua rters on the banks of the Missouri River to Salt Lake Valley, barefoot. M y father drove one of the four wagons that entered the Valley August 31 , 1848, arriving about sixteen days in advance of the other wagons. Fathe r built the first house erected in the First Ward, Salt Lake City. The fi rst grist mill in Utah was a small one built on City Creek, not far abov e where President Young's house now stands. An Indian stole a sack of cor n meal from this mill; his chief procured a pair of shears and cut off th e boys hair close to his head. This to him was great punishment. I will m ention no hardships, for any old veteran of the Church will know from th e above dates that I have passed through many."

BACK TO LIFE IN BRIGHAM CITY

While in Brigham City, Alonzo's father and mother were listed as clerk s d uring the years 1864 to 1877 in the Woolen Mills Department of the Co oper ative Institute, which institute was operated upon the principle o f the United Order. Lorenzo Snow and Jonathan Taylor Packer directed th e first United order project of the Church. Alonzo tells of helping in hi s father's tannery, which also may have been a department of the Cooperat ive Institute. A knowledge of this craft was to serve Alonzo well at a la ter time in his life.

Alonzo gained a love of music as he listened to the brass bands play duri ng the drills of the militia to which his father belonged. As will be sho wn, this interest and talent played a very important part in his later li fe. Alonzo's father became a member of the first City Council of Brigha m City when it was incorporated in 1867. During the Brigham City days,

Alonzo's father owned a store near the railroad depot where he sold fruit , candy, gurn, etc. to the weary travelers. As a means of supplementing t he family income during these years, Alonzo's mother, Avilda, operate d a boarding house. Cafes and restaurants had not as yet been establishe d in these early settlements, consequently, boarding houses satisfied th e needs of those persons requiring a place for meals and, in some cases , as a place for some persons to live. No doubt the operation of this boa rding house was an act of Providence as far as Alonzo was concerned.

ALONZO AND LYDIA ANN (ANNIE)

Alonzo's mother hired a young Canadian lady to work for her in the operat ion of the boarding house. Her name was Lydia Ann Parker, the daughter o f Solomon Parker and Nancy Welch, of Edwardsville, Ontario, Canada. Anni e had been married to Henry L. Powell. Two children had been born to thi s couple, William Henry, who only lived for six months, and Nancy Jane, w ho at this time was three years old. A close relationship between Alonz o and Anne developed into interest, love, courtship and then culminatin g in marriage. The couple were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lak e City on 6 July, 1869. Daniel H. Wells officiated in the ceremony and fo r the remainder of his life, Alonzo carried a picture of Brother Wells i n his wallet as a reminder of that most important event of his life. At t he time of their marriage he was 28 years old and she was 22. Annie's fir st husband simply deserted her, leaving her with Jane.

THE ARIZONA YEARS

Alonzo's father went on a trip to Arizona before May, 1884, to determin e whether or not this undeveloped area might be suitable as a place to br ing his family. When his father returned with a glowing report of the opp ortunity to acquire undeveloped land at a nomimal cost, a decision was ma de to move to Arizona.

During the month of May, 1884, the Alonzo Packer family in company of the ir daughter, Janie and her husband, Seth Wright, the William Jefferson P a cker family, a sister Sonora and her husband Lorenzo Wright, and the Ch arles Forsgren family, set out in a covered wagon train for another lon g and treatures journey to Arizona.

LIFE IN THE GILA VALLEY

Alonzo and Annie were both well prepared to endure the rigors of early pi oneer life in Arizona. Alonzo was 43 years old and Annie was 37 when the y entered the Gila Valley area on October 4, 1884. Among the first settle rs in the valley.

Alonzo was a craftsman with many talents and skills, which he combined t o make a great contribution to the development of Safford. He was a skil l ed brick mason and built the first brick home in Safford.Several of th e homes that he built are still standing and are lived in at this time (1 999 ). He also laid brick in the construction of the Layton Ward Chapel.

Annie possessed great qualities of leadership which were evidenced in he r method of raising her daughters as well as the fulfilling of responsib l e positions in Church service. She served as President of the Relief So ciety and of the Primary. She filled other positions as well, and soon ha d the reputation of having the ability to make things move. In other word s she was a mover and a shaker.

A TOUCH OF CULTURE FOR THE VALLEY

Alonzo had an interest and talent in music. While living in Brigham Cit y he was a member of a band. He brought the first drums into Safford, a b ass drum, which he played, and two snare drums. Having learned the tannin g trade from his father, Alonzo prepared his own skins to cover the dru m heads. It took several weeks to prepare these skins in a tub of tannin g solution. He played his bass drum as a member of the Safford Pioneer Ba nd, which group performed for all-important festivities in the early day s of Safford. Other members of this famous band included James F. Freesto ne, snare drum, and Peter Jacobson, the fife. This band made very impress ive music on all occasions, but was especially an important part of the p rograms for the Fourth of July.

Annie's talent related to the home and its surroundings. She loved and ow ned lovely linen and fine china dishware. She was always a gracious hoste ss and many people were royally entertained within her home. William's wi fe, Mary Ann, often joined her in preparing dinners for house guests. Sin ce there were no hotels in Safford at that time. Church authorities ofte n stayed in the Packer home. Among those thus entertained were: John Henr y Smith, Francis N. Lyman, Rudger Clawson, Heber J. Grant and Carl G. Mae ser.

Annie was about 5 feet 4 inches tall. She had dark, curly hair and large , dark eyes full of snap and fire. She always dressed well and was descri bed by my father as being "majestic and queenly" in appearance. She wa s a lover of flowers and beautified her home and yard with a wide variet y of flowers that she took great pride in growing. At the time the Packe r family moved into the Gila Valley, there was still danger from hostil e Indians and outlaws. The children never seemed to outgrow their fear o f them and were afraid to even have a small. light in the home after dar k .

TRUE TO THE FAITH

Alonz and Annie were worthy, devoted members of the Church of Jesus Chris t of Latter-day Saints. Alonzo donated the land on which the first Layto n Ward chapel was built. While the chapel was under construction, meeting s were held in a bowery on the back of the lot. This bowery was built wit h cottonwood posts and a roof consisting of branches. During this time Al onzo was a counselor to Bishop John Welker.

THE FAMILY INCREASES AS IT DECREASES

Alonzo was about six feet in height, of slender build, weighing about 17 0 pounds. He had hazel eyes, iron grey hair, and wore a well trimmed bear d. He was always well groomed and wore a wide brimmed black felt hat at a ll times when out of doors. This hat hung by the door for convenience sin ce he always put it on upon going outside even for the smallest errand. I t seems reasonable to assume that his practice of wearing this type of ha t could have been an influence carried down (by) his Quaker forefathers.

The rigors of pioneer life eventually took their toll in the life of Alon zo Hamilton Packer. He died in his home in Safford, before the 76th anniv ersary of his birth. A granddaughter, Lillian F. Millett, who attended hi m during his final days relates the following: "I had the privilege of ca ring for Grandpa Alonzo the last weeks of his life. He never allowed anyo ne to wait on him, and it was difficult to persuade him to rest in the be d this day. I remember so well the day that he came home after takin g a 5 gallon can of milk to the creamery. He drove in a one-horse buggy w ith the buggy top just as erect as he sat beneath it. On this day he cam e to the fire place to warm himself, and asked me to fix him a' hot todd y '. I was surprised, as he never asked anyone to do anything for him. Wh en I saw that he was chilling as he drank the hot drink, I realized tha t he was very sick. As I urged him to lie down, he remarked, "No,. ..i f I go to bed, I will never get up. I am not like your grandmother, whos e body is accustomed to sickness and has built up an immunity. When I giv e up to the bed, that is the end for me".

"It was only a short five days from the day he went to bed before death t ook this courageous soul. Grandma had been ill for a number of years, an d she lingered for another year in a paralyzed condition before passing . A touching incident occurred just before Grandpa died which brought t o mind the nearness we are to the 'other side'. I was seated by his bedsi de watching him very closely, as I realized that the end was near. He aro se from the bed with a glassy look in his eyes as though he could not se e me nor hear me calling him. Walking across the room where the picture o f his brother, William was hanging. (William preceded him in death), he t ook the picture down and stood gazing at it for some time. I was nervou s and tried to persuade him to return to his bed. After a time he laid th e picture or the sewing machine sitting near and without a word or eve n a look at me, he returned to his bed. The end came a few hours later.

"It was also on this day that his old friend, James F. Freestone came t o see him. He had walked with the aid of his cane the distance of the 2 0 acre field that separated the two of them, to pay his respects to Alonz o. As he entered the room, he stood for a time looking down upon his frie nd in bed, then he said, "Well...'Lonzo." Alonzo replied, "Well ... James ." "Two short words! That was the only exchange. That was all that neede d to be said. A lifetime of meaning and emotion were packed within thes e few words. There is no doubt that many mental images of past associatio ns and experiences flashed through their minds during this solemn moment.

Descents from John Howland (Mayflower)and Elizabeth Tilley
JOHN HOWLAND
(b. 1592; md
Elizabeth Tilley)
|
DESIRE HOWLAND
(b. abt Feb 1625-26;
md John Gorham)
|
MERCY GORHAM
(b. 20 Jan 1658;
md George Denison)
|
ELIZABETH DENISON
(b. 11 Sep 1689-90; md
Christopher Champlin)
|
JOSEPH CHAMPLIN
(b. 4 Aug 1709;
md (2) Mary Noyes)
|
JOSEPH CHAMPLIN
(b. abt 1765;
md Mercy Sisson)
|
WILLIAM SISSON CHAMPLIN
(b. 16 Apr 1794;
md Mary Ring)
Angeline Avilda Champlin
Margaret Emma Champlin
|
ALONZO HAMILTON PACKER 
PACKER, Alonzo Hamilton (I42)
 
225
The 1925 Iowa State Census is unusual because it included who the
parents were, not only for each person but also who the parents of
the parents were, in the census along with the birth dates/places
and their marriage place.
Gertrude is shown to be a daughter of James Linder and Matilda
Goranch. Matilda's last name is misspelled here, should be Gorsuch.
This census also helps to tie Gertrude's mother as Matilda Gorsuch
Linder Windhurst. Matilda, Gertrude and Grace were all part of the
family of George Windhurst in the 1895 Iowa State Census. Grace also
appeared as a stepdaughter of Geo Windhurst in the 1900 US Census.
Ancestry.com
1925 State Census Williamsburg, Iowa, Iowa, USA
1 Jan 1925
Hana W Manar Head M abt 1869 56 Married Michigan
Father: Lancesal Manor b. Michigan
Mother: Elizabeth Woodward b abt 1844 in Michigan
Parents' Marriage Place: Michigan
Gertrude L Manar Wife F abt 1880 45 Married Iowa
Father: James Linder b. Iowa
Mother: Matilda Goranch b. abt 1858 in Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa
Floyd S Manar Son M abt 1904 21 Single Iowa
Father: Harve (Hana) W Manor b. abt 1869 Michigan
Mother: Gertrude Linder b. Iowa age 45 Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa
Alfred O Manar Son M abt 1906 19 Single Iowa
Father: Harve (Hana) W Manor b. abt 1869 Michigan
Mother: Gertrude Linder b. Iowa age 45 Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa
Bernice Manar Dau F abt 1909 16 Single Iowa
Father: Harve (Hana) W Manor b. abt 1869 Michigan
Mother: Gertrude Linder b. Iowa age 45 Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa
-illegible Manar Dau F abt 1912 13 Single Iowa
Father: Harve (Hana) W Manor b. abt 1869 Michigan
Mother: Gertrude Linder b. Iowa age 45 Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa
Dorcas Manar Dau F abt 1916 9 Single Iowa
Father: Harve (Hana) W Manor b. abt 1869 Michigan
Mother: Gertrude Linder b. Iowa age 45 Iowa
Parents' Marriage Place: Iowa 
Source (S1132)
 
226
The census had water damage. The "L" of W L Burns was an "S"
1880 US Census Precinct 4, Gregg, Texas
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFNX-D98
W L Burns Self M abt 1856 24 Married AL NC NC
Maggie Burns Wife F abt 1856 24 Married TX NC AL
James Burns Son M abt 1876 4y1m May Single TX AL TX
If born within the Census year, give the month: May
Mattie Burns Dau F abt 1878 2y11m Single TX AL TX 
Source (S1740)
 
227
The father's name was a mistake. Edward was Isaac's older brother.
STATE OF OHIO
BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
Place of Death: Lorain
Registration District No. 753 File No. 65299
Primary Registration District No. 8331
Registered No. 374
or City of Lorain
Full Name: Isaac N. Linder
Sex: Male
Color or Race: White
Single, Married, Widowed or Divorced: Widower
Date of Birth: Unknown
Age: 79
Occupation: Watchman
Birthplace: Ohio
Name of Father: Ed Linder
Maiden Name of Mother: Not known
Birthplace of Mother: Ohio
Date of Death Dec. 8, 1922 
Source (S1028)
 
228
The handwriting for Sarah's last name was bad, should be "Demmon" (Damon)
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X8SJ-PVP
Name: Isaac N. Linder
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 17 Oct 1865
Event Place: Lorain, Ohio, United States
Spouse's Name: Sarah Dennison 
Source (S1033)
 
229
The Whiteside Sentinel, Morrison, Illinois, Prophetstown News
Transcript
Nov 2, 1899 - Marriage licenses for the week ending Oct 28, 1899: Gil bert Lancaster, 20, and Lena Wallace, 18, both of Prophetstown. Jul 14, 1 902 - Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Lancaster have invited the Epworth League to t heir pleasant country home Friday evening for a social time. Jan 11, 190 4 - Gilbert Lancaster is named in the obituary of Edward Lancaster as on e of his children. Oct 10, 1904 - Gilbert Lancaster is here from Rock Isl and to visit his mother, Mrs. Edward Lancaster, and other members of hi s family. Gilbert has sold his farm near Rock Island. He better buy anoth er. [The columnist seems to feel free to give advice.] Jan 16, 1905 - Lit tle Geneva Lancaster died of diphtheria. She was ill but ... [part of thi s item was illegible]. She was the daughter of Gilbert Lancaster of nea r Rock Island. Jan 31, 1905 - Woodward's Bluff - [Parts of this item wer e illegible] .. bert landed home from Arkansas. Sep 21, 1905 - Gilbert La ncaster and his bride were the guests of his brother and his family at Pr ophetstown Saturday and Sunday. Gilbert was married the 6th of Septembe r last to Miss Nicewonger, who appears to be a very sensible and capabl e young woman. Gilbert will farm in the spring. Sep 28, 1905 - Mr. and Mr s. Gilbert Lancaster of Andalusia, Illinois visited at Herbert Lancaster' s. Oct 12, 1905 - Gilbert Lancaster has rented a house near the Luthera n church for the winter. In the spring they will move to the old homestea d now owned by the brothers Edwin and Herbert. Jul 23, 1907 - A ten poun d boy came to make his home with Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Lancaster, Thursda y morning July 18th. Sep 9, 1907 - Gilbert Lancaster arrived home this mo rning from North Dakota. He has been surveying the country in that regio n in a general way and on the whole seems to be well pleased with the far m prospects. Many of our young agriculturists feel hopeless ever being ab le to pay for a farm in Illinois, so seek cheaper land in the Dakotas, Ka nsas and Canada. 
WALLACE, Lena (I16553)
 
230
There is some doubt this belongs to William and Dora Linder because of the residence place
Ancestry.com
U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989
Name: Dora Lander
Gender: Female
Residence Year: 1943
Street address: 75 Hager rd Roch
Residence Place: Greece, New York, USA
Spouse: William Lander
Publication Title: Greece, New York, City Directory, 1943 
Source (S860)
 
231
Third Wife of James Guymon a Polygamist.

According to Clara Boyer (file on Microfilm "James Guymon & his 6 wives" ) , Rhoda had dark hair and blue eyes. She was the first girl born in Le ec hburg, PA. The man who donated the ground for Leechburg town site wa s na med Leech. He was a wealthy man who never had any children of his o wn . Rhoda's parents consented for her to live with them; but when her p are nts joined the LDS church, they took Rhoda with them. Mr. Leech lef t a c onsiderable amount of money to Rhoda, which has never been collecte d. Th is was published in a magazine year after, but it was considere d outlawe d and was turned back to the state.

City Cemetery of Springville City. Location of Grave is: Blk63 Lot 4 P o s 2 by Sexton/Grand 12/14/1899

FamilySearch showed this additional information:
Confirmation - Date: 1836

BIRTH: Also shown as Born Jackson, Madison, Tennessee, United States. 
GUYMON, James (I177)
 
232
This family is listed (without any source) as M A Knowlton's family in some family trees in Ancestry.com
Was not able to find this family in FamilySearch
1870 US Census Memphis Ward 7, Shelby, Tennessee
Robt Beith M abt 1826 44 Scotland
Martha Beith F abt 1836 34 Tennessee
John Beith M abt 1852 18 Tennessee
Nicholas Beith M abt 1854 16 Tennessee
Mary Beith F abt 1858 12 Tennessee
Robt Beith M abt 1860 10 Tennessee
William Beith M abt 1863 7 Tennessee
Veronica Beith F abt 1868 2 Tennessee 
Source (S2083)
 
233
This family is listed in several family trees
in Ancestry.com as Francis's family. This may
be her family in the 1880 census but no proof
is listed there that I know of that proves that.
1880 US Census District 642, Carroll, Georgia
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M8L6-CG5
Joseph R. Green Head M abt 1832 48 Married GA NC GA
Sarah J. Green Wife F abt 1842 38 Married GA GA GA
Frances L. Green Dau F abt 1862 18 Single GA GA GA
Semion Green Son M abt 1866 14 Single GA GA GA
Josephine Green Dau M abt 1870 10 Single GA GA GA
James M. Green Son M abt 1872 8 Single GA GA GA 
Source (S1983)
 
234
This is an interesting fact about Estella's life although it does not prove anything. Unless a marriage record with Sexton is found.
The Marion Daily Star (Marion, Ohio)
Saturday, December 19, 1908
ELMER SEXTON GETS SUSPENDED SENTENCE
-----------
Must Never Be Seen in Company of Miss Linder
-----------
MUST NOW FACE A PERJURY CHARGE
-----------
Father of Girl Causes Sexton's Indictment
for Perjury in Securing a License. To Marry
Sixteen-Year-Old-Girl--Grand Jury Returns a
Bill Against Sexton at Marietta.
Elmer Sexton, a widower, with three children,
who eloped last June from Denmark (Ohio) with
sixteen-year-old Estella Linder, pleaded
guilty in a charge of rape before Judge
Campbell, in the common pleas court, at Mt.
Gilead, Wednesday. He was sentensed to serve
six months in the workhouse, but the sentence
was suspended pending Sexton's good behavior.
Sexton will still have to face a charge of
perjury at Marietta.
At the time of the elopement no clue could
be found as to their whereabouts. Several days
later they returned to Denmark and said they
were married. G. E. Linder father of the child.
Immediately began legal proceedings against
Sexton, preferring a charge of rape in a justice
court, and filing a suit in the common pleas
court to annul the marriage. Sexton was bound
over in the grand jury and was indicted.
Meanwhile, Mr. Linder began proceedings at
Marietta, the place where the marriage took
place, charging Sexton with perjury on the
grounds that he swore falsely regarding the
age of the girl. A true bill for perjury has
been returned against him in Washington county.
At the present session session of the Morrow
county common pleas court. Judge Campbell
declared the marriage void, and assessed the
costs against Sexton. In suspending his sentence
on a charge of rape., the court forbade Sexton
ever being seen in the company of the Linder girl. 
Source (S1606)
 
235
This is how this Find A Grave appeared until I made changes to it on November 12, 2015
William "Bill" Roberts
Find A Grave
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=66952228&ref=acom
Birth: 1900
Death: 1948
Family links:
Spouse:
Vadie B. Roberts (1902 - 1986)
Burial: Laurel Grove Cemetery
Norton, Wise County, Virginia, USA
Created by: Andy
Record added: Mar 15, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 66952228 
Source (S1950)
 
236
This source gives Louisa's last name as Faling
Iowa, County Death Records, 1880-1992
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVJP-N6FQ
Name: George Windhurst
Event Type: Death
Event Date: 22 Jun 1916
Event Place: Williamsburg, Iowa, Iowa, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 67
Birth Year (Estimated): 1849
Father's Name: William Windhurst
Mother's Name: Louisa Faling
Certificate Number: 183
Page: 81 
Source (S1638)
 
237
This source gives the last name of Bessie
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2QCN-PF8
Name: Daniel Rockwood Shepard
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 17 Sep 1950
Event Place: Holmes, Ohio, United States
Age: 40
Birth Year (Estimated): 1910
Father's Name: Walter R Shepard
Mother's Name: Bessie M Rockwood
Spouse's Name: Esther Eileen Kaser
Spouse's Age: 40
Spouse's Birth Year (Estimated): 1910
Spouse's Father's Name: Charles Kaser
Spouse's Mother's Name: Clara Swanger 
Source (S1732)
 
238
William's grave stone shown in Find A Grave has him
listed as born in 1900 and died in 1948. The 1900 US
Census has him listed as born in Jan 1899 and 1 year
old. His Virginia death record has him as born, 13 "Dec"
1900. That date could not be correct as he was listed
in the 1900 Census which was enumerated on June 13,
1900, "Jan" was listed as his birth month. If the grave
stone birth year 1900 is correct, then his birth would
have to be in January. His birth must have been 13 Jan
1900. But several census's have his birth year listed
before 1900. Whatever, his gravestone "and" his death
record state he was born in 1900.
Ancestry.com
Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014
Name: William Grimes Roberts
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age at Death: 47
Birth Date: 13 Dec 1900
Death Date: 24 Jun 1948
Death Place: Norton, Wise, Virginia, USA
Registration Date: 27 Jun 1948
Father: George Roberts
Mother: Ellen Neal
Spouse: Vadie Bryant Roberts 
Source (S1948)
 
239
[Grant001.FTW] [Grant Family Association, Report of the...reunion of t h e Grant Family Association..., (Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: Press of A. V. Haig ht , 1899-), pp. 22] I. WILLIAM GRAUNT - of Roxby, Yorkshire, who marrie d J ane, daughter of William Burton of Ingmanthrop, and had issue.The abo v e and following data are compiled from: Harl. MS. 18011, fo. 149b. 148 7 , fo. 391b. 1349, fo. 174. 1415, fo. 17b. 1571, fo. 112b. Ralph MS. 14 15 . J. J. Howard, LLD., Maltravers Extraordinary, MS. and contributions,Pa ver's marriage licenses, Yorkshire Inquisitions, Pedigrees and MS. o f Bu rton, Belford, Parker, Byerley, Appleton, Boynton, Claryonette, Wrig ht, B ulmer, Key, Power. Parish Reg., Roxby (Pickhill cum Roxby) North Al lerton , Holme. William Graunt lived in the middle of the fifteenth centu ry, an d was succeeded by his son II. JOHN GRAUNT .......

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FROM "SCOTS, KITH AND KIN" - A Guide to the Clans & Surnames of Scotlan d : GRANT - Despite Gaelic (or Gallic-Scottish pronunciation)interpretati on s, the name is sim ply from the French GRAND, either 'Big'or 'Eminent' , a nd the family was kn own in their origi nal Normandy withthe motto 'S tan d Fast!' This is still the motto for the GRANT CLAN ofScotl and. Intr oduc ed in Scotland by marriage with the Inverness-shire BISSETS,Gregor y Le GR ANT wa s Sheriff of the territory before 1250 and Laird(Lord) i n Strathe rrick, northeast of Loch Ne ss, whilst his son,Lawrence, by mar rying a CO MYN heiress, acquired Strathspey lands that thereafter becam e their hom e country. The Glenmoriston branch was a 16thcentury offshoot ; and t hey , as indeed most of the clan, Norman in nameonly, adhered loy ally to th e Stewarts, thoug h the GRANT chiefs alwaysfavoured the rulin g government . Of General Ulysses Grant, U.S. President 1868-1876, it wa s wagered his' poker face' co ul d not be tricked into emotion. But whe n a clansmancalle d the old slogan 'Stand Fast, Craigel lachie!' (a Speys ide crag),the forf eit had to be surrendered, with smiles all round. SEPT S: ALLAN BUIE MACIL ROY SUTTIE BISSET GILROY MACKERRON BISSETT MACALLA N MACKIARAN BOWIE MACG ILROY PRATT FOUND: GRANT, John [Sir Knight] Born : 17 Aug 1596, of, French ie, Perthshire, SCOTLAND Died: 1 Apr 1637, Holy rood Castle (Palace), Edin burgh, Mid-Lothian,SCOTLAND Bur: Apr 1637, Hol yrood Abbey, Edinburgh, Mid -Lothian, SCOTLAND Father: John GRANT Mother : Lilias MURRAY Marr.: 11 De c 1613 [by Contract of marriage] Spouse: Mar y OLGILVIE CHILDREN: Mary GRA NT- Chr: 8 Jan 1596, Cromsdale,Inveralla n & Advie, Inverness,SCOT. Bapt . 4 Feb 1982 SLAKE/ End. 23 Apr 1982 SLAK E/ SP. 30 Apr 1982 SLAKE FOUND : John GRANT & Lilias MURRAY CHILDREN: 1 . Annas or Agnes GRANT - born: 15 95, Frenchie, Perth-shire, SCOT. 2. Si r John GRANT -born: 17 Aug 1596, Fr enchie, Perth-shire, SCOT. 3. Jean o r Janet GRANT - born: 1597, Frenchie , Perth-shire, SCOT. 4. Lilias GRAN T - born: 1599, Frenchie, Perth-shire , SCOT. 5. Katherine GRANT - born : 1604, Frenchie, Perth-shire, SCOT. Eld est daughter named for the Mater nal grandmother; Second dau. named for th e Paternal grandmother; Third d au. named for her mother; Third son name d for his father. FROM even mor e records found, I've discovered that thes e clans, GRANT,MURR AY & OGILV Y (OGILV IE) intermarried for many generati ons. Child: John GRANT: Birt h - Abt 1501, Frenchie, Perthshire, SCOT. 
GRANT, William (I9418)
 
240 HISTORY OF THOMAS GUYMON
Thomas Guymon was born March 17, 1787; a son of Isaiah Guymon and E l izabeth Flynn. His father Isaiah, was the first Guymon born in the Unit e d States, and a soldier of the Revolutionary War. We know very little a bo ut the childhood days ofas Guymon. The first we know he was a youn g m an living in Surry County, North Carolina. He was a good natured
man and was liked by everyone who knew him. He was an ambitious young m a n with a fairly good education for those days, for we know he had enou g h education to be a school teacher. He was also a farmer. It seems tha t i n the first part of the Nineteenth Century people only had time for s choo l when there was no farm work to be done; therefore he farmed in th e summ er and taught school in the winter. The descendants of Thomas Guym on hav e in their possession a contract which reads as follows:

CONTRACT FOR TEACHING SCHOOL

Articles of an agreement made and entered into between Thomas Guym o n of the County of Jackson, in the state of Tennessee of the first par t , and we the undersigners of the other part. The said Guymon does bin d hi mself to teach a school foee months, of reading and writing five da y s out of every week, at the rate of six dollars per year. One half in c ur rent money to be paid at the end of school; one half to be paid in cot ton , wool or cloth delivered at the home of said Guymon; or corn or por k a t the
market price delivered at the mouth of Procters Creek. The trade to be p a id on or before the 25th of December. The school house to be built at t h e Dripping Spring, between that of Guymon and Orson Martins. The schoo l t o begin on the second Monday in August. The said Guymon to make up al l
lost time that he does loose. The said Guymon is to keep good order in t h e school. The subscribers with the teacher are to build a good sufficie n t schoolhouse. The house is to be ready in good time. Signed this 11 d a y of July 1821.
Signed: Thomas Hicklen, Archibald M.Levant, Orson Martin, Salton Coyd, J o hn McLearen.

Along with the other work Thomas Guymon did while living in Tenness e e, he operated a ferry boat crossing over the Cumberland River. His fer r y consisted of several boats, some large and some small. The large boa t s were big enough to caro teams and wagons .The large boats were
run by horse power. The horse was in the center of the boat, the horse w e nt round and round, which worked the paddles, and the paddles pushed t h e boat across the river. The small boats were propelled by hand or b y a r ope stretched across the river.

Thomas married Sarah Gordon the 23rd day of February 1807, and toge t her their married life began in Surry County, North Carolina. Here the i r first three sons were born. They moved from North Carolina to Jackso n C ounty, Tennessee about 18ennessee was the birth place of their ne x t three sons and one daughter. They lived in Tennessee for some ten yea rs ,then they moved to Paris, Edgar County, Illinois , where three more d aug hters were born to them.

One beautiful day in 1836 Thomas's son James came home very excite d , with information about a new church. It was different from the othe r ch urches they had known. Thomas and his sons were out in the forest ch oppin g wood. When James tolm his story they listened with interest, an d w hen James had finished speaking, Thomas stood upon a log and said, "s ons , that is the gospel of Jesus Christ. It is just what we have been lo okin g for." Thomas and his wife Sarah, his sons James and Thomas, and hi s dau ghters Barzilla, Polly Ann and Melissa Jane were converted to the C hurc h of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. They soon joined the saint s and w ere with them through all their persecutions .

From the history of Caldwell County the following information was o b tained. A document or covenant made in Caldwell County, Missouri, Janua r y 29, 1839. Among the signers we find the name of Thomas Guymon and hi s s on Noah Thomas.

"We whose names are here underwritten, do each for ourselves indivi d ually here-by covenant to stand by and assist each other, to the utmos t o f our abilities, in removing from this state in compliance with the a utho rity of the state ; ando hereby acknowledge ourselves firmly boun d t o the extent of all our available property, to be disposed of by a co mmit tee who shall be appointed for that purpose, for providing means fo r remo ving of the poor and destitute who shall be considered worthy, fro m thi s country till there shall not be-One left who desires to move fro m the s tate; with this proviso, that no individual shall be deprived o f the righ t of the disposal of his own property, for the above purpose , or having t he control of it, or so much of it as shall be necessary fo r the remova l of his own family, and be entitled to the surplus, after t he work is af fected; and furthermore said committee shall give receipt s for all proper ty, and an account of all expenditures of the same.
(There were 214 signers).

The committee members were as followsl William Huntington. Charle s B ird. Alanson Ripley. Theodore Turley, Daniel Shearer, Shadrack Roundy , an d Johnithan H. Hale.

Thomas came across the plains to Utah, leaving Illinois in the spri n g of 1850 with the Aaron Johnson Company. With him were his children w h o had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, with th e ex ception of James who cae year before. The children were all marri e d and had
families of their own, except Melissa Jane, and she and her future husba n d did their courting while crossing the plains. They arrived in Salt La k e Valley in September 1850. Thomas lived only five years after comin g t o Utah. The fact that they had joined the church had divided his fami ly ; because his sons Isaiah, John and William never joined the church, a n d as a result they and their families remained in the State of Illinoi s . He never for one moment regretted joining the Church, but he did regr e t the separation in his family. We have many copies of letters exchang e d between those who remained in the east with those who came west.

Thomas Guymon died in Springville, Utah County, Utah 20 October, 18 5 5.
CHILDREN OF THOMAS GUYMON
Isaiah Guymon born 15 Feb 1810 in Surry County, Nort h C arolina
John Guymon " 28 Nov 181 1 i n " " " "
W1l1iam Guymon " 2 Jan 181 5 i n " " " "
James Guymon " 27 Dec 1816 in Jackson County, Tenn e ssee
Noah Thomas Guymon " 30 June 1819 in " " " "
Martin Guymon " 12 June 182 1 i n " " " "
Barzilla Guymon " 31 Dec 182 3 i n " " " "
Elizabeth Guymon " 19 July 1826 in Edgar County. Illinois
Polly Ann Guymon " 11 July 1829 in " " " "
Sarah Jane Guymon " 11 July 182 9 i n " " " "
Melissa Jane Guymon " 14 Feb 1833 in " " " "

In volume 6, page 337 of the History of the Church, we find that
Thomas Guymon filled a mission to North Carolina in the year 1844.
This was his birth place.

Copied by Lyle Q. Crandall and Thelma Crandall for the Harriett Guymon
reunion on l6 Oct. 1982

_UIDBBB9146246CCD511B70D0020E0C2BF4168C8 
GUYMON, Thomas (I172)
 
241 STORY OF MALINDA GIMLIN LEWIS

AS TOLD BY HER CHILDREN, EDWARD, IDA AND JUNE MOODY.

Malinda Gimlin Lewis was born 10 Sep 1866, in Minersville Utah. He r parents were Samuel Lewis and Sarah Jane Huntsman.
Not much is known of the doings in the childhood days of Malinda w e will tell tell a few incidents of her early life as she has told it t o her children.
June Moody, daughter of Malinda says, "As I remember mother she wa s slender built had blue grey eyes, dark brown hair which hung to her wa i st and she could even sit on it. I remember combing her hair many times , it was beautiful when it huer her shoulders, or done up in a big bob a t the back of her head. I always thought my mother was a beautiful woman . I never remember of her ever scolding me but once, she had made Glenn a and I a pretty white dress for the 4th of July. We wore those dresse s to church on Sunday and were to change them in the afternoon to keep th em lovely for a celebration the next day. We went home with some of our c ousins after church and wore the dresses all day. Naturally getting th e m messed up for the 4th and mother scolded us for not changing them pro perly. Mother had a beautiful voice voice she could sing so clear and hig h. I did love to hear her sing."
Back to Utah-Mother said when they lived in Panguitch it was so col d they had to chop through three feet of ice to get water for the cattl e to drink, and cut out the tree tops to feed them. While the family wa s eating breakfast one morning.her Trajo knocked at the door and was le t in. Father asked him how he was. Trajo said "I don't know, my horse al l die my cow all die, got two wagon, guess they no die, sell one to ge t a little mut, to get a little grease, to make a little gravy, maybe s o maybe so no. I don't know"
It is told of Aunt Keturah that once when she road a horse down tow n and got home she was so cold she couldent get off her horse, without he lp, and the reins were frozen in her fingers and they had to be pried out , it was so bitter cold. Thily always said Panguitch was the coldest spo t on earth, and they were thinking of selling out and moving to a warme r climate.
When mother was a girl she and some neighbor children went swimmin g in a lake, she suddenly began to sink as it was very deep, having bee n taught to prey, she began to prey to the Lord for help.she was inspire d to hold her hands close to hees and stiffen her body, as she did so he r body shot up to the surface and she was saved from drowning. It might n ot work for others but it worked for her.
In December our family decided to sell our home and move to Arizona , it was almost tragic to part with home and friends so dear. but it wa s done and in the latter part of December when everything was disposed o f and wagons packed and everg in readiness they said their goodbys and st arted south, snow was deep and so cold but they dident mind that. It wa s a long hard journey but our parents were used to hardships an so they t ook it all in its stride. All their earthly goods were packed in two stro ng wagons, one pulled by a team of horses the other by ox team with broth er Oliver the driver, the other boys walking most of the way driving th e live stock, It tells of the trouble getting over the river at Lee s Fer ry and hardships along the way, so it will be omitted here.
The Lewis family was given a corner lot in Pima to make their home , and at first they lived in wagon boxes and sheds made of willows late r log houses were built and the family was more comfortable. It was whil e here the children went to schnd attended church and other organizations .
April 8 1881 being Founders Day in this small town of Pima, it bein g the date of the first families to enter this town, and it was celebrate d in good old fashioned way by a gettogather with sports and games wit h a big program. Now this had in April,and on May 1st the people cellebra ted May Day on May 1st at this time they had a queen and maids and they r uled the day, Sarah Weech was crowned queen and Malinda Lewis was one o f the maids,these girls were all dressed in white and of corse were the p rettiest girls in town, or at least one young fellow that though so, thi s young man was Winfred Moody, when he first set eyes on Malinda he fel l for her, he took her to several dances,and socials,and finely took he r to his home to meet his parents, by car?no by buggy?no, she got up behi nd him on a horse and they went riding to his home in fine style. This Ma y Day was held in a cottonwood grove just east of the town of Pima, a pre tty s pot covered with grass and so shady. It was the first May Day part y ever held in the Gila valley, and these two young people always remembe red when their life together first began. Malinda was fifteen years old(s he was too young to be going out boys but they dident think so) Winfred w as proud to introduce his girlfriend to his Pa and Ma. This romance conti nued for a long time Malinda and Winfred both joined the choir and enjoye d the practices very much as both were good singers, and there wasent to o much entertainment in those days, Malinda's sister Laura also joined an d the girls both had beautiful voices so these went to school that winte r sang in the choir and during this time the romance between Winfred an d Malinda ripened into something stronger and when Malinda's lover ask fo r her hand she gave it freely.
Now history says this Pima choir was preparing songs and music for t he Latter Day Saint Conference which was to be held in Snowflake, in octo ber 1882 this being the headquarters of the Stake at this time, she siste r Laura was in love with toir leader and both she and her sister Malin d a were going to make this trip to help sing, and then go on to St. Geor ge to be married in the Temple there. and about the first of September th is party of singers were ready to make the trip by team and wagon that lo ng trip back to Utah in the fall.
After the conference was over most of the choir members returned hom e, and a number of them made the trip on to St. George. The roads weren t too good the weather cold and they had some worries but the trip was ma de safely, and these couplee married and sealed in the Temple for time an d all eternity, Mother was sick most all the way she had chills and fever , the elders would administer to her and she would rest fine for awhile t hen she would be worse again it was to bad to spoil their fun like that , all the way, Grandma was along she helped what she could but it seeme d these chills had to run their course and after they reached St. Georg e they had to wait a week before Malinda was able to go through the Templ e, by the way mother already had her endowments when she was 14 years ol d and father had his so all they had to do was go and be sealed. There wa s J. K. Rogers taking two girls to have sealed to him, Eli Dodge to marr y Amanda Reynolds and several others who went with this group on to St. G eorge to be married in the Temple. After it was all over they returned ho me but not all together, our group stopped at night along the way with fr iends who lived on ranches along the road people they had known while the y lived in Utah, they were always welcome, stayed nights with them ate wi th them and were given horse feed, and the evenings were spent in singin g and dancing. And thus late in December they all returned home safely.
Now our parents are back in the Gila Valley the next thing was to bu ild a home. History says Pa and Ma built a little shack on his homestead . Winfred had taken up some land, and the job now was to clear it and ge t it ready for farming, thes a little spring of water about 100 yards fro m the shack. Grandfather had died about three years before and left fathe r 20 acres of land as his part of the family estate.
During these years three children had blessed the home of this coupl e and father was trying hard to get his land in condition to make a livin g on. One day while he was at work down below the house a neighbor came r iding up his horse only haoop on its nose and he was bareheaded, and ridi ng on a high loop, he told mother she better get oput of here quick sayin g the indians are coming they are just over the hill. Mother said, "How c an I get out of here with with these two babies?" he said "I dont know bu t you better hurry they have have just killed a man in Bare Spring Flat a bout 15 miles from here, "Mother said if they were chasing him on a horse , how could she get out two babies and another coming expect to stay aliv e for long?" Mother went into the shack and under the bed, the little boy s began to cry for water and she herself could spit cotton she was so thi rsty, and in the afternoon late here came a dust storm and it took the ro of off the shack and she was looking for indians all that time but none c ame, and as it neared sundown she could see indians sillouetted on the cr est of the hills or raises above the shack. It turned out to be roses an d their flowers looked so much like feathers. Father had been late gettin g home that night and found his family in a state of confusion. as the st orm blowed off timbers which hit little Winnie and hurt him badly, and th ey were all so thirsty and afraid to go for water. They were very glad wh en father came home to share their troubles. It was learned that Brothe r Frank Thirston had been killed out in the Bare Springs Flat about 15 mi les away.
Mother had three boys then a girl, and after they began to grow bigg er father took the two older ones to help him and the two younger ones we re left at home to help mother. these two were Ed and Ida, they helped i n the house and did choreh helping the other with outside work and hous e work. Ed Moody said one morning he got up real early saw a wild cat tak ing their only chicken from the coop old tom the dog right after it. "Wel l" he said; that night I waited till late to get the firewood in for nigh t and as I carried it around the corner of the coop, Sam was there playin g a trick on me as I rounded the corner he jumped out on all fours and ye lled BOO at me. Well I thought that it was the wild cat so I dropped woo d right on him and ran for the house, and under the bed I went, screamin g bloody murder, mother was disgusted trying to find out what the troubl e was, Sam came in bawling, saying Ed had dumped a whole armload wood o n top of him and he dident like it. Soon mother saw the funny side of i t and advised him not to scare his brother like that, and not to act lik e a wild cat again.
Mother had a little girl named Eunice and a boy named Johnnie, thes e two were both taken from us. When our little Johnnie died, father was s omewhere between home and Globe, on the freight road, mother sent him wor d by the stage line, he ge word at San Carlos in the evening, that he roa d a mile about 45-50 miles home he dident dare to stay on the road as i t was very dangerous while the indians were roving the country, he took t o the brush lands and over trackless wastes, but it was the safest way ho me getting here in time to take over the responsibilities and burial of o ur precious baby.
Dad was on the freight road a long time, and one time the renegade i ndians had left the reservation and were doing all the damage they could . Mother was at home alone with us small children and was always nervou s and upset always afraid theans might come and kill us all. One night sh e got up out of bed after midnight, took us children barefooted and start ed for grandmothers home more than a mile away, she too was afraid to tra vel the road but took to the brushes others did and when she got to wher e the music hall now stands on the College grounds in Thatcher, she encou ntered a bed of rattle snakes, it seemed there was a thousand of them bu t suppose there was only about a dozen anyway, even one of them would hav e been terrible that time of night or morning and so dark, Mother lik e a real mother said a prayer, asking for help from on High, and got it , she took the baby in her arms told the other children to walk behind he r and walked through that infested spot in safety, reaching her mother' s home which was just south of the Thatcher church house, Of course mothe r aroused the family Grandmother was scared when she saw mother looking s o white and nervous, she told her her story and they were soon safe and r esting. One of the great lessons mother taught us was to pray when ever w e needed help (and here is another great lesson, besides praying when w e need help is to pray always and thank the Lord every day for all our bl essings then when we need help we have a little bank account to draw from , If we only pray when we want something we are very poor children indeed )
We mothers children marvel at the accomplishments of our little moth er.If anybody was in need mother was there if she knew about it, Mallar d Preston when his mother died said my mother went there and did sewing f or him and his brothers andrs, how she maid pants shirts and dresses, hel ped them a lot. and she also helped the Carlson children when their mothe r died. Andy was just a little fellow, once he started down the road, mot her ask him where he was going, O he said "I am going down the road to se e what I can see, then see if I cansee it, always seeing for the humorou s side," "It always helps to bear your burdens" mother would say.
In the year father and Sam started freifhting from Naco and Cannene i a in Mexico. Winnie got work in Clifton, that left me to run the farm , dad had put in 20 acres of Lucern and some grain, it only got about a f oot high when the drowth hitd it dried up. but lots of food there. One da y as the lod wood burning train came rumbling through some sparks from th e engine settled in the dry pasture and set it on fire and burned the who le field. Mother and I were up town we saw the big smoke, later saw it wa s our field on fire we were just heartsick, but the Rail Road never gav e us a penny for our loss.
Mother had to be a farmer and handyman in every way, and those wa s h days---We had to draw water from a 40 foot well heat it over a wood f ire, then wash scrub and boil the clothes, such a job, scrub on a washboa rd with homemade soap, We hadld washer that turned a wheel back and fort h over and over again and How I grumbled and fussed because I had to do t he work. I was so honery and gripped so much. I know mother would rathe r have done it herself but it was us kids who needed the work and the res ponsibility. O if mother could have lived to enjoy some of the modern hel p we have today, and we should be more appreciative of our parents and wh at they have done for us.
On the morning of July 28 1903, mother was very sick I was sent to g et the Elders, when I got back I was met at the bedroom door I was met b y a Relief Society Sister and she said "Ed you will have to hurry your mo ther has been waiting for yhe cant hold out much longer, so I rushed in k neeled by her bed but was so full I could say nothing, she put her hand o n my broe and said "Ed you have always been a good boy to me then her han d dropped and she was gone, she had already said goodby to the other chil dren, and was only waiting for me to come so she could go for she was cal led home, and in those few seconds there flashed thru my mind a thousan d ways in which I had been unkind, I went out on the porch and there wa s my five year old sister her three year old brother in her arms and bot h sobbing their little hearts out. So I took them both in my arms and res olved to be a good brother and help dad all I could as he had a great res ponsibility now more than ever. I have seen and heard of motherless child ren, but you can never realize what it is to be without a mother til yo u lose your own. And the dear little helpless babe, after the funeral wa s over and we were back home, everything seemed so strange, couldent hel p but feel that mother would come walking thru the door, and I am sure sh e was worrying about us and the dear little babe who needed her care so b adly. Surely she lingered close by and with us guiding us from pitfalls a s best we would listen to her influence. The little babe dident have th e best of care, we dident know anything about baby formulas, sanatation a nd sterelized bottles and baby care so Ida did the best she could at carr ing for it but it dident do very well, and finely Aunt Keturah came fro m Mexico and took over the care of this precious little bundle of humanit y. and she did a good part by it. I still think it was mother' s spirit u rging our Aunt to come care for this our dear baby sister. And so time we nt on and we had to adjust to a new kind of life.
Of course in mother's life she couldent have accomplished so much wi thout the help of poor old dad. with all the sorrows and tragedys mothe r went thru, we could hear her sing and see her sweet smile, how their ch ildren will never know. Takeor instance: When I was three years old I go t a butcher knife from the table, mother called me but instead of s toppi ng I ran faster and fell on the back doorstep, the knife ran into my lef t temple cutting a great gash and it bleed profusily, mother dident kno w how to stop it, so she tried ashes then flour, but with the help of sis ter Barney and several hours work it was finely stopped. I lost a lot o f blood.
When I was about five years old my brothers Winnie and Sam were goin g over to our neighbors the prices to return some borrowed matches, Cousi n Arthur went with them and I bawled to go so I went and after returnin g the matches we all went upee grandmother, as we started home a man by t he name of Swanger came along offering us a ride, they all climbed but m e and and the man said "Are you all in? someone said "yes so he started o ut, I was climbing on the wheel and the wagon ran over me, I was carrie d home with a broken hip. Dr. Rosebeck set it, and as there was no plaste r to be had for a cast, I was wrapped in a sheet and someone had to be b y me for thirty days and nites to keep me quiet while my hip healed.
Once we had smallpox and scarlet fever, and had to be quarrenteened , still my parents found time to help their neighbors five miles away. On ce mother went to Central to help with the sick, and dad was to come tak e her home, she got tired wg and walked home thru a thicket of batto mone y where the hobos were very bad, father was just starting after her whe n she came walking in.
Cousin Ed said "Mother taught me this little poem; as he was alway s asking when his birthday was, an how old he would be. "I will be four y ears old the 16 of September, and mother will make me a cake if I can r emember, and told me if I woull you today, with little cousin Arthur I mi ght go and play, I love my grandma and like to get her wood, she always t ells me thank you mom, and gives me something good."

Reception honoring Winfred Moody and his bride Malinda Lewis.

Comment; this should have been given on the first page but was missed. Af ter our parents returned from St. George When they were married their fo lks at home gage them a lovely reception, in fact it was the very first o ne ever given in the Gila Valley, a great crowd of relatives and frien d s gathered to wish them well and to enjoy the evening of fun, They danc ed, had singing and speech making, songs like, The little brown church i n the Vale, The Old Oken Bucket, Juanita, and many of the old ballads wer e sung, and stump speeches were the order of the day. Ida says "At this p arty her parents received many lovely and usefull gifts. Grandfather Mood y Grandfather Moody gave them a credit card for $100 dollars on the store , and I remember two large pictures whitch hung on the walls one especial ly was a picture of the Niagra Falls, dont remember who gave it to them.
Along with all their trials they had to endure, mother tells of goin g to plays, Theaters, an outstanding one was "Ten Nights in a Bar Room" , and many others famous at that time, they had many dances, quiltings, c andy pullings, and hay racks nearly all their fun was combined with wor k of some kind.
Mother was a student of a nursing class held in Thatcher, it was spo nsored by the Mormon church, the St. Joseph Stake, directing the work her e. Our Mother joined this class, and continued the studies till she compl eted the course and receivr diploma. She was a big help among her friend s and neighbors, always ready to help the sick and it seemed there wa s a lways plenty of sickness at that time. Rulen was the baby then and Id a w as the baby tender, she would take the baby to mother about twice a day , while at school to be nursed, then bring him back home till mother retu rned.
Here are some comments from the little sister June, "I remember; M y sister Ida took care of us children when mother was away helping the si ck. When Winnie was down with typhoid fever, so awfully sick mother sen t me to stay with Aunt Susie Cge with my grandmother Moody, I watched he r put my clothes away in a drawer. I got so homesick that once when ever y one was away I took out my clothes and walked home. I must have been ab out five years old and walked a mile to my home. Mother dident schold m e she just put her arms around me and loved me, I was a home girl I tel l you Home sickness is the worst sickness there is. I remember when Winni e was sick and they gave him Eagle Brand milk it is so sweet and good, on ce I said "Mother I wish I was sick so I could have some of that milk. Mo ther said "Dear you don't need to get sick to get some of that milk so sh e gave me some. Mother had a beautiful Alapaca dress long sleeves, skir t and high neck, she wore it to church, she was a good seamstress, very t idy and proud, she held her head high and she had beautiful hands, she wa s very kind and gentle. Our cousin Arthut Lewis stayed with us a lot eve n till my mother died later he went to Mexico and lived with Aunt Ketura h Baker. When mother was so sick they took Rulenand me to Aunt Lulas, an d we we rent home when mother passed. I can never forget the terrible los s I felt , I used to cry myself to sleep and have bad dreams, when it wou ld thunder and rain I would think about mother up there in that big hol e and I was afraid she would get cold. I would go to other homes and se e the girl s with mothers and feel so bad because I dident have one. Alth o father was so good to us and he took mother's place and did the best h e could not even he could take mother's place. Later I realized how he mi ssed her also. We stayed with grandma for some time after mother left ust hen we settled down at home I was 11 years and Glenna was 13, she did th e washing and ironing while I did the cooking, we had to bake bread and i t was a hard job for girls so young. We did a lot of singing, at home fat her would card on the old organ and we sing the different parts, he use d to play, O My Father, After mother passed away I couldent stand to hea r that song, I tore the page out of the hymn book, they practiced it on e Sunday in Sunday School, I got to crying and had to leave, Elizabeth Pa ce saw me leave came and talked to me till I got control of myself. Glenn a did our sewing she made us both just alike people sometimes thot we wer e twins.

CONCLUSION

Winfred Moody was president of the High Priests Quorum, of the St. J oseph Stake, and Brother Cheny was one of his councilers, Well Brother Ch eny died and of (course) father had to go to the funeral, he dident tel l mother because he dident wo worry her, but we children knew about it, A bout 2 P.M.mother went into a coma, father was sent for and when he retur ned she felt better so he told her where he had been. "Yes she told hi m I knew where you were, I was there also, and I saw several people ther e who have been gone over there a long time, "then she told him the name s of the speakers there and the songs they sang, for she heard and saw th e whole funeral service. To me this was a great testimony that there i s a great hereafter, and that our loved ones are often allowed to visit u s here.

Quote from Ida's story. "The next day I was alone in the house, an d Mother called me to her bedside and said", Ida I must go and leave al l of you soon, and you will have to take over the responsibility of bein g a mother to your brothers anders, especially to the little baby. I beca me frightened and ran out into the orchard and prayed for someone to com e to help us, soon Aunt Lizzie was at the door, she said, "How is your mo ther?" I have the Relief Society sisters at my house quilting and had din ner ready to serve, A voice said to me "Go to Malinda" I said to myself t hat I would go as soon I got the dinner over with, Again the voice said " Go to Malinda" I ask one of the ladies to serve dinner and here I am, I n ever waited to hear more, I ran to the orchard again and thanked my Heave nly Father for answering my second prayer. and this is another wonderfu l Testimony to me that the Lord hears and answers PRAYERS.

Brother Ed quotes; Anyway we all grew up, married, made homes of ou r own and raised our families as best we knew how, Perhaps we have regret s for things we left undone thru the years, and perhaps we did things w e shouldent have done. but ss life and thru the teachings of our dear par ents, we have tried hard to bring up our children so that our parent s be hind the veil will be proud of their grandchildren, who have been taugh t to be noble and honorable.
Now we are getting older than our mother was when she passed on. I w as only fourteen years old when mother died just knew her that long; I wi sh I could put love and honor into my children as mother did with hers, i t is hard to realize thatr accomplished so much in such a short life. Tod ay her little babe she left is sisty two years old, a lovely woman, It wo nt be long now till we will all be with mother and father again. in a fam ily group "Over There" I am seventy eight now and I hope I am ready to g o home when my call comes.

FamilySearch showed this additional information:
Census - Date: 22 Jul 1870 Place: Minersville, Beaver, Utah Territor y , USA

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Census - Date: 8 Jun 1880 Place: Panguitch, Iron, Utah Terrirory, USA

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Census - Date: 23 Jun 1900 Place: Precinct 12, Graham, Arizona Terri t ory, USA 
LEWIS, Malinda Gimlin (I23)
 
242 Posted By: B. Doyle
Email: bdoyle01@aol.com
Subject: Robert Husted (b. c1596)
Post Date: November 14, 1998 at 01:37:51
Message URL:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/husted/messages/21.html
Forum: Husted Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/husted/

I'm providing the following information that I have researched fo r y our
viewing pleasure. Any corrections/additions would be greatly appreciated.
Please provide sources. Thank You.

Descendants of Robert Husted


Generation No. 1

1. ROBERT1 HUSTED (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of
Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911) , P gs.
576 & 577.) was born 1596 in Somerset Co., England (Source: Spencer P. M e ad,
Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecti c ut,
(New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.), and died 1652 in Stamford, CT (Sourc e :
Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfiel d & S tate
of Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.). He married (1) JOANNE
SMITH, daughter of ANGELL SMITH. He married (2) ELIZABETH MILLER
(Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of
Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.) Ab t . 1620.

Notes for ROBERT HUSTED:
After arriving in Massachusetts, he remained there for a few year s a nd then
moved to Stamford, CT. In July 1642, he was granted a parcel of land a t S tamford.
He owned land in both Stamford and Greenwich, CT.

More About ROBERT HUSTED:
Immigration: 1635, Massachusetts (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Histor i e of Ye
Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York,
1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.)

Child of ROBERT HUSTED and ELIZABETH MILLER is:
2. i. ANGELL2 HUSTED, b. 1620, England; d. 1706, Greenwich, CT.


Generation No. 2

2. ANGELL2 HUSTED (ROBERT1) (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie
of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New
York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.) was born 1620 in England (Source: Spence r P .
Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of
Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.), and died 1706 in Greenw i ch,
CT (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of
Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.). He
married REBECCA SHERWOOD (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye
Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York,
1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.) Abt. 1654.

Notes for ANGELL HUSTED:
He settled in Greenwich, CT. He was one of the original patentees n a med in
the patent granted to the town of Greenwich in May 1665.

Marriage Notes for ANGELL HUSTED and REBECCA SHERWOOD:
They had nine children.

Children of ANGELL HUSTED and REBECCA SHERWOOD are:
3. i. ANGELL3 HUSTED, b. Abt. 1654; d. Abt. 1728.
4. ii. JOSEPH HUSTED, b. Abt. 1662.
iii. REBECCA HUSTED, m. JONATHAN REYNOLDS.
5. iv. SAMUEL HUSTED, b. 1670; d. 1741.


Generation No. 3

3. ANGELL3 HUSTED (ANGELL2, ROBERT1) (Source: Spencer P. Mead,
Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecti c ut,
(New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.) was born Abt. 1654 (Source: Spencer P.
Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of
Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.), and died Abt. 1728 (Sou r ce:
Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield &
State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.).

Notes for ANGELL HUSTED:
He was married twice to unknown wives.

Children of ANGELL HUSTED are:
i. BENJAMIN4 HUSTED (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town
of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911 ) ,
Pgs. 576 & 577.), b. 1700 (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Tow n o f
Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911) , P gs.
576 & 577.); d. 1783 (Source: Spencer P. Mead, Historie of Ye Town of
Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecticut, (New York, 1911),
Pgs. 576 & 577.); m. MARIA SARAH NEWMAN (Source: Spencer P. Mead,
Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich County of Fairfield & State of Connecti c ut,
(New York, 1911), Pgs. 576 & 577.).
ii. MARY HUSTED, b. 1720; m. JONATHAN KNAPP.
iii. MOSES HUSTED, b. 1705; m. SUSANNA MEAD, 1726.

4. JOSEPH3 HUSTED (ANGELL2, ROBERT1) was born Abt. 1662.

Child of JOSEPH HUSTED is:
i. SARAH4 HUSTED, m. JONATHAN MEAD, 1726.

5. SAMUEL3 HUSTED (ANGELL2, ROBERT1) was born 1670, and died
1741. He married ELIZABETH.

Child of SAMUEL HUSTED and ELIZABETH is:
i. JOSEPH4 HUSTED, m. DEBORAH FERRIS. 
HUSTED, Robert (I1899)
 
243 James Reynolds and Deborah his wife were living in the Narraganset t C ountry in the year 1665, and doubtless at an earlier period. This are a wa s in dispute for years between the colonies of Rhode Island and Conn ectic ut. James with others red to acknowledge allegiance to the Connecti cu t Colony, and as a result they were taken prisoners and carried to Har tfo rd 24 May 1677
Abstract of the Will of James Reynolds
"I give and devise unto my son Joseph Renolds ten pounds in mone y . I give and devise unto my son Henry Renolds five pounds in money; an d m y negro girl Doll to him and his heirs. I give and devise, unto my so n Fr ancis Renolds forty shillinr its equivalent. I give unto my daught e r Deborah Sweet, my negro girl Betty forever: I give unto my daughter M er cy Nichols five pounds in money or its equivalent, to her and her heir s . I give to my grandson John Renolds ten shillings. I give unto my gran dd aughter Sarah Renolds _____ in money. All the rest and residue of my p ers onal estate wheresoever, I give and bequeath unto my son Francis Reno ld s whom I appoint my executor of this my last will and testament.
"Dated October 15th 1692.
(Signed) James Renolds"
At an early period slavery extended into the New England Colonies, a n d James Reynolds made deeds of gift of slaves to his children. There ap pe ars, however, to have been a growing sentiment against holding human b ein gs in bondage, and befois death James requested his children to gi v e his old servants their freedom whey they arrived at the age of thirt y y ears. Accordingly we find on record instruments wherein their father' s wi shes were acceded to. The following was the deed of gift of John an d Debo rah Sweet:
"Know all men by these presents, that whereas I, John Sweete of King s town, in the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, have re ce ived a deed of gift, made to me and my wife that now is Deborah Sweete , w hich deed of gift is frur honored father James Renolds senior of sa i d Kingstown in said Colony, wherein is by our honored father given to u s , our heirs and assigns, one negro girl called by the name of Betty, a n d is by the said deed of gift given unto us for ever, and also by our s ai d honored father's last will and testament as doth appear, she is give n t o us for ever, notwithstanding we find by a later deed of gift of ou r hon ored father that he hath seen cause to alter his mind, and is willi ng, no twithstanding his former deed of gift, and his last will and testa ment, t hat the said Betty his negro girl, shall be free and at her own d isposin g when she attains to the full age of thirty years, to which las t deed o f gift of thirty years, we, John Sweete and my wife Deborah Swee te, do b y these presents declare and consent to our honored father's las t deed o f gift, and do bind ourselves, our heirs, executors, administrat ors, an d assigns firmly by these presents, to set the said Betty, our ne gro serv ant, free, to be wholly at her own disposing forever.
"In witness whereof we set, out hands and seals, the day of the da t e hereof, being the twenty first day of September, in the year of our L or d, One thousand seven hundred.
(Signed) "John Sweete
"Deborah Sweete
"Signed, sealed, and delivered
in the presence of us
"Thomas Fry
"John Heath
"The above written instrument or deed of gift, was entered and compa r ed with the original, December 12th in the year 1701, by me
"John Heath
"Town Clerk."
The deed of gift of a negro from James to his son Francis was, howev e r, limited. At the age of thirty years he was to have his freedom:
"To all christian people to whom these presents shall come, I, Jam e s Renolds Senior, of Kingstown in the colony of Rhode Island and Provid en ce Plantations in America, send greeting; Know ye that I, the said Jam e s Renolds, for the love andection that I, the said James Renolds to b e ar unto my loving son, Francis Renolds of Kingstown above said, I the s a id James Renolds being in perfect memory, have given, granted and confi rm ed and by these my present writing do fully, freely and absolutely giv e , grant and confirm unto my said loving son, Francis Renolds, his heir s a nd assigns, all my right title and interest unto my negroe boy born i n m y house and known by the name of John, I say I do give said negroe bo y t o my said son, Francis Renolds, his heirs and assigns, with him or ei the r of them to live until he comes to the full age of thirty years, an d the n to be free and at his own disposing forever, and him to take unt o his c ustody immediately after my decease, and to the true performanc e of the s ame, I, the said James Renolds do bind myself, my heirs, execu tors, admin istrators and assigns, to him, my said son, Francis Renolds , his heirs, e xecutors, administrators and assigns firmly by these prese nts, in witnes s hereunto I have set my hand and seal this present day o f the date hereo f, being the twenty fifth day of January in the year o f our Lord One thou sand six hundred ninety eight or nine.
(Signed) "James Renolds Senior
"Signed, sealed and delivered
in the presence of us
"William Ffreye
"Thomas Ffreye"
"Mr James Renolds appeared the day and year above written, and ackno w ledged the above written instrument of sale to be his act and deed, Bef or e me
"Thomas Fry,
"Justice of the Peace
"The above written instrument or deed of gift was entered and compar e d with the original March 18th, 1698 or 9, by me,
"John Heath
"Clerk of the town, East Greenwich
James also transferred the homestead by deed dated 25 February 1683 / 4 to his son Francis and also gave him fifty acres of land which he ha d b ought of Samuel Wayte, and fifty acres which he bought of Thomas Harr is , making one hundred fiftyes in all
______________________________
"History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations"
by Thomas Williams Bicknell; pp. 285-7;
The American Historical Society, Inc.; New York City, New York;
1920 (F79.B58 CSL)

Note: James Reynolds married Deborah, surname unknown and they
were the parents of the following children: 1) John, born October 12,
1648; 2) James, October 28, 1650; 3) Joseph, November 27, 1652,
died in 1722; 4) Henry, January 1, 1656, died in 1716; Deborah, 1658;
5) Francis; Mercy, born in 1664 and 6) Robert, died in 1715.
[Research of Beth Hurd, RIGENWEB]
_______________________________
"New England Marriages Prior to 1700" compiled by Clarence Almon Torrey;
The Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryland;
1985 (974.0 NEa/Marriage SCGS)
Page 618
1648: James Reynolds married Deborah Potter at Providence, Rhode Island. _ ______________________________
R. I. Genealogical Register, Vol 4, No. 4, Abstracts North Kingstown Wil l s, Page 318 says:

Reynolds, James. Will dated 15 Oct 1692, pg 7. Mentions: Sons Joseph Rey n olds,
Henry Reynolds, & Francis Reynolds. Daughters Deborah Swe(burn) &
(burn)ry Nichols. Grandson John Reynolds. Granddaughter Sarah Reynolds.
_______________________________
New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume I

Author: William Richard Cutter

This is the Third Series, Volume I of a four series set. It has record s o f achievements of people from England, who have set up commonwealth s in N ew England. About 6000 names included in this record.

Bibliographic Information: Cutter, William Richard. New England Famili e s Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume I. 1915. Reprint, Bal ti more: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1996.
Page 52

(II) James Reynolds, son of William Reynolds, lived in Kings Town, Rho d e Island, and died in 1700. On May 13, 1665, he signed the petition fo r l and in Kings Province, and May 20, 1671, he took the oath of allegian ce . He served as constable in 1671, overseer of the poor in 1687, gran d jur yman in 1688, conservator of the peace in 1690. On May 2, 1677, h e was on e of those who petitioned the assembly for instruction, assistan ce and ad vice, as to the oppressions they suffered from Connecticut, an d on May 24 , 1677, he and the others who had been taken to Hartford as p risoners, re ceived the following from the Rhode Island authorities i n a letter: "Tha t you might receive all suitable encouragement that as y ou continue tru e to your engagement to this colony and upon that accoun t are kept prison ers, we shall equally bear your charges of imprisonment , and with all exp edition address ourselves to his Majesty for relief. " On July 29, 1679, h is name was on the petition to the King for an en d to the troubles betwee n the two colonies. He and his wife deeded to so n John fifty acres of lan d, December 26, 1673, and April 29, 1684, the y deeded one hundred acres i n East Greenwich to their son James. On Apri l 3, 1692, he deeded a slave , named Elizabeth, to his son-in-law, Thoma s Nichols, and wife Mercy, i f said slave be alive at decease of grantor ; January 21, 1699, he deede d a negro boy named John to his son Francis , under same conditions. He de eded fifty acres to his son Henry, March 2 2, 1699. On June 5, 1699, he ra tified a deed to granddaughter, Sarah Air es, and her male heirs, having p reviously omitted the word heirs when de eding to his son John. On Septemb er 21, 1700, a declaration was made b y John Sweet that James Reynolds Sr . made a deed of gift to daughter Deb orah and her husband, John Sweet, o f a negro girl Betty, but that afterw ards he gave Betty freedom when sh e should be thirty years of age, and t o this John Sweet and his wife cons ented. His son James was executor o f his will, and March 14, 1703, he too k a receipt from his brother Henr y and also from Joseph and Francis for t heir shares in the estate. Jame s Reynolds married Deborah (???). Children : John, born October 12, 1648 ; James, October 28, 1650; Joseph, mentione d below; Henry, mentioned bel ow; Deborah. 1658; Francis, October 12, 1662 ; Mercy. 1664; Robert, menti oned below; Benjamin.
____________________________
http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=wra n dall&id=I01253
1665, May 13: James Reynolds was one of the men who petitioned the R h ode Island Assembly asking accommodation of land in the new King's Prov in ce. He was one of the first settlers of that community now called Quid nes sett. He owned about 15res on the south side of a small stream gener a lly known as the Potowomut River, but also called Reynolds River, Mil l Ri ver and Greene's River at various times.
A small brook, now known as the "Sand Hill Stream" flows north throu g h this land into the Potowomut River. On the fifty acres west of this b ro ok James Reynolds built his homestead, and that land has remained in t h e family ever since. It iw owned by William Reynolds Essex, son of Jo h n Vaughan
Essex and his wife Mary E. Reynolds. [Information furnished by Mrs . E dwin W. Huling, 1938]
"James N. Arnold Collection" (Knight Library, Providence, Rhode isla n d)

1671, May 20: James Reynolds, took the oath of allegiance. Like hi s f ather he was prominent in town affairs. He served as constable.
1672, December 26: He and his wife deeded to their son John fifty ac r es of land. [Research of Beth Hurd, RIGENWEB
"History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations " b y Thomas Williams Bicknell; pp. 285-7; The American Historical Societ y, I nc.; New York City, New York; 1920 (F79.B58 CSL)

1675: The house which one finds there today is the fourth which ha s b een built on the site since 1665. The first house was burnt by the In dian s during King Phillip's Wars. It is said that on the night that th e war b roke out, all the inhabts fled to the block house near Wickford . An d all the houses in the country were burned except an old grist mil l call ed Essex Mill which stood about a mile from James Reynolds' home . This mi ll was used by the Indians during the war to grind their grain . John Reyn olds the eldest son was killed by the Indians that same fatef ul night whe n the hostilities broke out. He was shot while passing throu gh a swamp ne arby, but his body was recovered and brought home and burie d in the yar d before the house, which was rebuilt. The second house wa s burned by acc ident on a Sabbath morning in 1710. "They had swept the h earth and leavin g as they supposed all things safe, set out on horsebac k to go to Friend s Meeting. They got out on the plain just across the Po towomut River on t he farm where afterwards Gen. Greene was born, and hap pening to look back , saw their home in flames, Once again the house wa s rebuilt. [Informatio n furnished by Mrs. Edwin W. Huling, 1938]
"James N. Arnold Collection" (Knight Library, Provid4nce, Rhode Isla n d)

1677, May 2: James Reynolds was one of those who petitioned the Asse m bly for instruction, assistance and advice as tot the oppressions the y su ffered from Connecticut.
1677, May 24: He and the others who had been taken to Harford as pri s oners received a letter containing the following excerpt from the Rhod e I sland authorities: "That you might receive all suitable encouragemen t tha t as you continue trueour engagement to this colony and upon that a c count are kept prisoners, we shall equally bear your charges of impriso nm ent, and with all expedition address ourselves to his Majesty for reli ef" .
1679, July 29: His name was on a petition to the King for an end t o t he troubles between the two colonies.
1684, April 29: Then deeded one hundred acres in East Greenwich to t h eir son James.
1687: He was the overseer of the poor.
1688: James Reynolds was a grand juryman.
1690: He was the conservator of the peace.
1692, April 3: He deeded a slave named Elizabeth to his son-in-law , T homas Nichols, and wife Mercy, if said slave be alive at the deceas e of t he grantor.
1699, January 21: James Reynolds deeded a negro boy John to his so n F rancis under the same conditions.
1699, March 22: He deeded fifty acres of land to his son Henry.
1699, June 5: He ratified a deed to his granddaughter Sarah Aires, a n d her "maile heirs" having previously omitted the word heirs when deedi n g to his son John.
1700, September 21: A declaration was made by John Sweet that Jame s R eynolds, Sr., made a deed of gift to daughter Deborah and her husband , Jo hn Sweet, of a negro girl Betty, but that afterward he gave Betty fr eedo m when she should be ty years of age and to this John Sweet and hi s w ife consented. His son James was executor of his will.
1700: James Reynolds, son of William Reynolds, was a resident of Kin g s Town, Rhode Island where he died.
"History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations " b y Thomas Williams Bicknell; pp. 285-7; The American Historical Societ y, I nc.; New York City, New York; 1920 (F79.B58 CSL)

1700: James Reynolds died.
"New England Marriages Prior to 1700" compiled by Clarence Almon Tor r ey; p. 618; The Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore, Maryl an d; 1985 (974.0 NEa/Marriage SCGS) (Randall Research Library)

Note: In 1802 or 3: William Reynolds the then owner of the land, wan t ed a larger house and the third house built in 1730, was moved west t o a n adjacent farm. When the present house was being built and excavatio ns w ere being made for the cr, there was found the skeleton of a man whi c h all the family felt sure was that of John Reynolds, who was killed b y t he Indians. Such of the bones as could be gathered together were remo ve a nd interned in the old Reynolds burial lot which is down the roa d a shor t distance away. [Information furnished by Mrs. Edwin W. Huling , 1938]
"James N. Arnold Collection" (Knight Library, Providence, Rhode isla n d)
_______________________________
Note: Negro slavery was prevalent in the Rhode Island Colony in the ti m e of James Reynolds and he evidently owned several negroes most of who m h e gave to his children in his lifetime. Deeds show April 3, 1692 he g av e negro slave, Elizabeth and her child sucking at her breast to his so n-i n-law Thomas Nichols and Mercy (Reynolds) his wife. April 16, 1695 o f a n egro "born in my house" by the name of Torn or Thomas, of Jay, of D oogin t to his son, James. And on Jan. 25, 1698/99 of a negro John to son , Fran cis. In his will, he bequeathed a negro girl Betty to his daughter , Debor ah Sweet. Before he died, James expressed a wish that all his for mer slav es be given their freedom when they reached 30 years of age. Thi s wish wa s honored by the grantees. 
REYNOLDS (TWIN), James (I2157)
 
244 R. I. Genealogical Register, Vol 12, Abstracts North Kingstown Will s , Page 98 says:

Reynolds, Joseph, aged. Will dated June 1730, recorded 13 Sep 1739,
pgs 123-126. Mentions: Now wife Mercy. Sons Joseph Reynolds dec,
(burn) Reynolds, John Reynolds, Samuel Reynolds, (burn) Reynolds, &
Robert Reynolds. Daughters (burn), Susanna Clark, Mercy Jones, (burn)
Alice no surname, Mary B(burn), & Sarah Clarke. Grandson J (large bu r n).
Witn: William Hall, Benjamin (burn).
*************************************
Source: Baker Genealogy by John Komar at Warren Co., NY GenWeb Site
Will of James Reynolds, (see notes for James Reynolds father)
(FTM) R. I. Genealogical Register, Vol 12, Page 98 (Will of Joseph R e ynolds)
_______________________________________
Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island
Title: Austin, John Osborne, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island
comprising three generations of settlers who came before 1690
(Genealogical Pub., 1969 reprint of 1887 ed.)g three generations of
settlers who came before 1690
g three generations of settlers who came before 1690.
Genealogical Pub., 1969 reprint of 1887 ed.
Repository: Yavapai College Library
Call Number: F78.A935 1969
Page: p. 363

Will proved 1739; exx., Mercy; mentions sons John and Robert.
Most of will burned.
____________________________________
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# ID: I549343195
# Name: Joseph REYNOLDS
# Given Name: Joseph
# Surname: Reynolds
# Sex: M
# Birth: 6 Nov 1652 in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
# Death: Jun 1739 in North Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island 10 2 1 1 3 1 2 7 8
# Event: Signer Unknown 29 Jul 1679 Petition to the King 13
# Note:

Alias: Big /Joe/
REFN: 2362
"The Reynolds Pioneering Chronicles New York and Southern Michigan
Sojourn"
By Edith Watkins Worley Ash
Page 500
"Joseph (2) had pushed on into the wilderness to settle on the 'Great
Plain' several years before King Philip's War in 1675. 'The Great Pl a in
is the plateau of land back of Wickford, R. I., slopping up towards
Exeter Hill.'..."
"Joseph (2) Reynolds was the oldest surviving son with children... a n d
James (2) having no children had already deeded his share of the
Potowomut homestead farm to Joseph (2)'s eldest son, Joseph (3), born
about 1672-3..."
***********************
Genealogy.com
Moses Vail
Author: WM. Penn Vail
Call Number: CS71.V129
This book contains the history and genealogy of the Vail family of L o ng
Island.
Bibliographic Information: Vail. WM. Penn. Moses Vail. Privately Pri n ted.
1947.
Page 147-148
"REYNOLDS LINE - Catherine (6) was dau. of Griffin (5) Reynolds (b . 1 737;
d. 1823) & Elizabeth (or Amy) known as Keziah. Griffin (5) was son of
William (4) Reynolds (b. 1709; d. 1792) who m. Deborah Greene in 172 9 .
William was son of James (3) Reynolds (b. 1681) who m. in 1705
Sarah(???). James was son of Joseph (2) Reynolds (b. 1652; d. 1739) &
Mary(???). Joseph (2) m. 2d Mercy (???). Joseph was son of James (1)
Reynolds and Deborah (???). This line is known as the Kingston, Rhode
Island, Line. William (4) & Griffin (5) Reynolds both served in the
American Revolution."
************************
Genealogy.com
New England Families Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volu m e I
Author: William Richard Cutter
This is the Third Series, Volume I of a four series set. It has reco r ds
of achievements of people from England, who have set up commonwealt h s in
New England. About 6000 names included in this record.
Bibliographic Information: Cutter, William Richard. New England Fami l ies
Genealogical and Memorial: Third Series, Volume I. 1915. Reprint,
Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1996.
Page 53
"(III) Joseph, Henry and Robert Reynolds, sons of James Reynolds, ea c h
had a son by the name of John, who may have been ancestor of this
Reynolds line."
"Joseph Reynolds was born November 27, 1652, died 1722, and lived in
North Kingstown. Rhode Island; he married Susanna (???), and she mar r ied
(second) November 7, 1723, Robert Spencer; he may have had an earlier
wife than Susanna. Children: Joseph, Benjamin, George, Samuel, Eliza b eth,
John, mentioned below, Susanna, Deborah and Mary."
************************
Ancestry.com
Susan Kelly - suznkelley@aol.com - "Descendants of George Reynolds of
Exeter, RI"
"Legend says that a friendly squaw warned him so he and family could
escape to Wickford the night King Phillips war broke out. The indians
came to his home and ripped open all the feather beds looking for
valuables, emptying them on the ground until it looked like snow."
"Joseph2 Reynolds, known as 'Big Joe' lived to the good age of
eighty-seven years, surviving by seventeen years his eldest son, Jos e ph3,
with whom he has been hopelessly confused by Austin and many of the
Reynolds genealogists.
***********************
The Reynolds Family Association of America 1892-1922
Thirty-First Annual Report compiled by Mrs. Anna C. Rippier, Secreta r y
Historical Collections edited by Marion H. Reynolds, A. B.
Pages 77 & 78
"...the third son of James1 Reynolds was about twelve years old wh e n his
father petitioned for land in King's Province, and therefore nearer
fifteen by the time they settled in Quidnessett. As we do not know w h ere
his father lived before coming there, we cannot say just where Josep h 2
Reynolds was born. All indications point to his having married ear l y and
leaving the Potowomut homestead while still quite young. The traditi o n
is that he had pushed on into the wilderness and settled on the 'Gre a t
Plain' some years before King Philip's War in 1675. The 'Great P



Father: James REYNOLDS b: Abt 1620 in England
Mother: Deborah POTTER b: Aft 1619

Marriage 1 Mercy UNKNOWN b: 1672

* Married: Aft Aug 1717 in North Kingston, Rhode Island 11

Children

1. Sarah REYNOLDS b: 21 Oct 1709
2. Susannah REYNOLDS b: Abt 1711
3. Alice REYNOLDS b: Abt 1715
4. Robert REYNOLDS b: Abt 1720


Marriage 2 Mary UNKNOWN

* Married: Abt 1672 in North Kingston, Washington, Rhode Islan d 1 4 3 15 9
* Note: REFN7936

Children

1. Joseph REYNOLDS b: Abt 1672 in Kingston, Washington, Rhode Island
2. Deborah REYNOLDS b: Abt 1673
3. Robert REYNOLDS b: Abt 1676
4. James REYNOLDS b: 1681
5. Benjamin REYNOLDS b: 1683
6. Susanna REYNOLDS b: Abt 1685
7. John REYNOLDS b: 1688
8. Mercy REYNOLDS b: 1690
9. Samuel REYNOLDS b: Abt 1693
10. Mary REYNOLDS b: Abt 1695
11. Clement REYNOLDS b: Abt 1698


Sources:

1. Author: Edith Watkins Worley Ash
Title: The Reynolds Pioneering Chronicles New York and Southern Mi c higan Sojourn
Note:
Edith lived in Osseo, Michigan at the time she wrote and publish e d the book in 1995.
Repository:

Page: Page 490 & 500
2. Author: Wm. Penn Vail
Title: Moses Vail
Publication: Privately printed 1947
Note:
History of the Vail family of Long Island
Repository:

Page: Page 147-148
3. Author: Clarence Almon Torrey
Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700
Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore 1985
Note:
With an Introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts. Prepared for Publicati o n by Elizabeth P. Bentley.
Toledo Public Library, Toledo, Ohio #929.74 Tor
Repository:

Page: Page 618
4. Title: New England Historical and Genealogical Registers
Publication: New England Historic & Genealogical Society
Note:
Published quarterly by the New England Historic Genealogical Socie t y
Repository:
5. Author: James N. Reynolds
Title: Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850
Repository:

Page: Volume 5 - Page 92
6. Author: Mrs. Anna C. Rippier, Secretary
Title: The Reynolds Family Association of America
Publication: Press of the Brooklyn Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922
Note:
Thirty-First Annual Report
Historical Collections edited by Mrion H. Reynolds, A.B.
Repository:

Page: Pages 70 & 78
7. Author: J. Montgomery Seaver
Title: Reynolds Family History
Publication: American Historical-Genealogical Society, Philadelphi a , Pa.
Repository:

Page: Page 21
8. Author: Not recorded
Title: Genealogy of a Part of a Branch of the Reynolds Family in t h e United States
Publication: Not recorded
Repository:

Page: Not listed
9. Author: Compiled and Edited by Mrs. Anna C. Rippier, Secretary
Title: The Reynolds Family Association of America 1935-1937
Publication: Historical and Genealogical Collection
Note:
Forty-fourth, forty-fifth and forty-sixth annual. 1935-1937
"Reynolds Family" by Sheridan Ellsworth Gardiner, M.D., Mount Plea s ant, Michigan.
Repository:

Page: Page 52
10. Author: Edith Watkins Worley Ash
Title: The Reynolds Pioneering Chronicles New York and Southern Mi c higan Sojourn
Note:
Edith lived in Osseo, Michigan at the time she wrote and publish e d the book in 1995.
Repository:

Page: Page 490
11. Author: Susan Kelley
Title: Descendants of George Reynolds of Exeter, RI
Note:
suznkelley@aol.com - "Descendents of George Reynolds of Exeter, RI"
Repository:
12. Author: Mrs. Anna C. Rippier, Secretary
Title: The Reynolds Family Association of America
Publication: Press of the Brooklyn Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922
Note:
Thirty-First Annual Report
Historical Collections edited by Mrion H. Reynolds, A.B.
Repository:

Page: Page 70
13. Author: J. Montgomery Seaver
Title: Reynolds Family History
Publication: American Historical-Genealogical Society, Philadelphi a , Pa.
Repository:

Page: Page 19
14. Author: Edith Watkins Worley Ash
Title: The Reynolds Pioneering Chronicles New York and Southern Mi c higan Sojourn
Note:
Edith lived in Osseo, Michigan at the time she wrote and publish e d the book in 1995.
Repository:

Page: Page 500
15. Author: Mrs. Anna C. Rippier, Secretary
Title: The Reynolds Family Association of America
Publication: Press of the Brooklyn Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1922
Note:
Thirty-First Annual Report
Historical Collections edited by Mrion H. Reynolds, A.B.
Repository:

Page: Page 77 
REYNOLDS, Joseph (I2161)
 
245 THE HISTORY OF STONINGTON, CONN., by Richard A. Wheeler, page 236.
1. Allen Breed, the progenitor of the Breed family appears fro m L ynn, Mass., in 1630. He was b. in England in 1601. The name of his wi fe i s unknown. He d. Mar. 17, 1692, and had five children.

A MODERN HISTORY OF NEW LONDON COUNTY, CONNECTICUT, Benjamin Tinkh a m Marshall, A.M., D.D., Editor-In-Chief, President of Connecticut Colle ge , New London, Volume II, 1922, Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Ne w Y ork City, page 59.
The family which he was a member traces to Allen Breed, who wa s o f record in Lynn, Massachusetts, as early as 1630. He was born in Eng lan d in xxxx and his death occurred March 1692. The name of his wife i s unkn own, but he became thef five children.

A RECORD OF THE DESCENDANTS OF ALLEN BREAD, Who Came to America fr o m England in 1630. Hathaway & Brothers, The Evans Printing House, Four t h and Liberty Sts., Philadelphia, 1892, page 1
Allen Bread, the ancestor of all of this name in the United Stat e s of America, was born in England. We do not know in what part of the c ou ntry. An aged member of the family in Lynn, MA, is quite sure he wa s a wh olesale grocer in Livet present we must simply say, "We do not k n ow."
As to his wealth or social standing and religious belief, the re a der may learn with us, that the following facts prove him to have bee n am ong the best and most respected of the Puritans who came with Winthr op t o Massachusetts, in 1630
He lived in Lynn near the point where Summer street crosses th e T urnpike. We do not know who his first wife was or how long she live d afte r the birth of John. That part of the town where Allen lived, is s till ca lled "Breed's End".
In 1638, when the town lands were divided by a Committee, appoin t ed by the town, consisting of Daniel Howe, Richard Walker and Henry Col li ns, "to lay our farms," one allotment was made of 800 acres, three o f 500 , one of 350, one of 21ne of 200 acres each. Allen received 200 a c res.
In 1640, about forty families left Lynn to settle a new plantati o n. Allen Bread was one of these. They invited Mr. Abraham Pierson, wh o ha d resided at Boston and at Lynn, to be their pastor, and he went wit h the m.
They made an agreement to establish a church before leaving Lyn n . They made an arrangement with one Capt. Howe to transport goods fro m Ly nn to the new plantation, at least three times a year.
The Articles of Agreement, under which they embarked, were sign e d by John Cooper, Edward Howell, Edmund Needham, Josiah Stanbury, Henr y W alton, Allen Breed, William Harcher, Thomas Newhall, John Farrington , Tho mas Sayre, Daniel Howe,e, George Webb, Thomas Halsey, Philip Ker tl and, Thomas Paddington, Thomas Terry.
In their Church Agreement, they offer to resign their power in t h e premises as soon as the town shall have been laid out by them, an d a ch urch established, provided that those who follow them shall be gov erned b y their Articles of Agr
They sailed in the vessel of Capt. Daniel Howe to Scout's Bay , i n the western part of Long Island, where they purchased land of Mr. J ame s Forrett, agent of Lord Sterling, and agreed with the Indians for th ei r rights.
On hearing of this, the Dutch laid claim to that part of the Isl a nd, on account of previous purchase from the Indians, and sent men to t ak e possession, who set up the arms of the Prince of Orange on a tree. T h e Lynn people, disregardilaims of the Dutch, cut down the trees a nd be gan to build. Captain Howe took down the Prince's arms, and instea d ther eof, "an Indian drew a very unhandsome face." The Dutch Governor be cam e angry and arrested six of the men, and imprisoned them until he comm un icated with Winthrop, when he was compelled to let them go. They then r e moved more than eighty miles and settled in the eastern part of the Isl a nd, where they established to town which they named for the place fro m wh ich they had sailed, Southampton.
The vessel, which was owned by those who left Lynn to settle o n L ong Island, in 1640, was first bought by eight men, Farrington, Stanb orou gh, Welbe, Job and Thomas Sayre, Needham and Walton. Afterward, by c onsen t of the company, All, Halsey and Harker were admitted into the c o mpany.
The vessel became the property of David Howe, in consideratio n o f his holding it subject to the requirements of the company.
We find that when Allen Bread relinquished his share in the vess e l he received a "home lott, planting lott, and farme."
In 1642 these settlers built a church, and Mr. Pierson remaine d a s their pastor until 1647, when he left them, because he believed tha t no ne but members of the church should receive the rights of freemen, h oldin g that no man was fit tate for others, unless he was himself obed i ent to the laws of God. Mr. Pierson went to Branford, Conn., and late r h e became the first pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Newark , Ne w Jersey. His son was the first President of Yale College. Mr. Piers on' s withdrawal from Southampton was probably the reason that Allen Brea d re turned to Lynn. We know that he [Allen Breed] resided there in 1656 , as h is marriage took place at that time to Elizabeth Knight, a dau. o f Willia m Knight, who settled in Lynn in 1630, and who received, in 1638 , sisty a cres of land. Her sister, Ann Knight, was called, in Nov. 1646 , to witnes s in Court, in a suit of Taylor vs. King, for recover for a m are, in jure d by a bull on the highway. Ann Knight became the wife of Ed ward Richards , (b. 1616).
At a general town meeting, Dec. 30th, 1661, it was ordered b y a v ote that Ensign John Fuller, Allen Bread, Senior, and Richard Johns on sho uld examine certain land claimed by D. Salmon, as a soldier in th e Pequo d Wars.
The descendants of John (No. 253 to 263) from the "Breed's Hil l b ranch," and the descendants of Allen-2 are divided in the next genera tio n into two branches. Those from his son John are the "Stonington bran ch, " and those from his otheen constitute the "Lynn branch" of the f ami ly.
In 1692 (the year when there was so great excitement in New Engl a nd about witches), the Town appointed the Committee to seat the peopl e i n the church, except in the pulpit and at the table, and in the deaco n' s seat. These seats were tigned only by Town Meeting. Allen Breed , "s enior," was one of the eight assigned by vote to a seat in the pulpit .
If this was Allen-1, he was 91 years old, and Allen-20 was onl y 3 2 years old, and we, therefore, believe that this man, so honored, wa s th e respected father of this family, at the age of sixty-six.
___________________________

Prepared by Oliver Randall Smith Buckley (Mrs. Frank C.) Presente d a t Meeting of the BREED FAMILY ASSOCIATION, March 14, 1923., page 29.
Our progenitor Allen Bread of Lynn, born in England in 1601, m a y have been either the Alline, son of John I, or Allen son of John II , bu t in either case the Allen who emigrated to America was a man of sta bilit y and means for he came akholder in the Mass. Bay Co., having 2 0 0 acres of land allotted to him, or 50 acres for each member of his fam il y. The activities of this family for the half hundred years followin g th e settlement at Saugus or Lynn, is familiar to us all...
___________________________
BREED FAMILY: ALLEN BREED OF LYNN, MASS AND HIS DESCENDANTS, page 38.
Prepared by Miss Mary Blake Breed, of Lynn, Mass. Presented at the A n nual Meeting of The Breed Association, March 14, 1923.
In the year 1630 there sailed from England for the new world a c o mpany of resolute men, fearless and brave, to find there religious tole ra nce, freedom of thought and a better chance to carve their fortunes an d l ive in accordance withghest ideals. They were called Puritans. T he y sailed with a party under John Winthrop, first Governor of the Massac h usetts Bay Colony. With them came one Allen Breed - I seem to see i n m y mind's eye Allen Breed, a rather stout, tall, young man striding al on g with resolute step to the wharf, where was anchored the good ship Ar abe lla and fifteen other ships waiting to take the party to the promise d lan d. With Allen Breed came his wife and two sons, Allen and Timothy.
On June 12, 1630, the little fleet arrived at Salem, a compan y o f nine hundred souls, being the Massachusetts Company, under John Win thro p. Here they separated - Allen Breed coming to Saugus, and later t o Lynn , MA.
In 1640 Allen Breed, with others from Lynn, sailed away to sett l e a new plantation and landed on Long Island, where they established t h e Town of South Hampton, named after the town in England from which th e y came.
In 1642 these settlers built a church. Abraham Pierson of Bost o n and Lynn had gone with them to become their minister. He remained wi t h them until 1647 when he left them because he believed that none but m em bers of the church should bee men, for said he, "No man should ma ke l aws for others unless he himself is obedient to the laws of God."
Allen Breed left South Hampton and returned to Lynn about this t i me. He was appointed to "sit in the high seats," a great honor in thos e d ays, and also received a grant of two hundred acres of land.
Allen married (1) Elizabeth WHEELER, daughter of Thomas WHEELER and Eliz a beth, on 14 Nov 1622 in England. Elizabeth was born 18 Jul 1602 in Pull ox hill, Bedfordshire, England. She died in Lynn, Essex Co., Massachusett s.

They had the following children:

+ 2 M i Allen BREED was christened 27 Jan 1630/1631 and died Jan 17 0 7.
3 F ii Elizabeth BREED was born about 1630 in Lynn, Essex Co., Ma s sachusetts.
Elizabeth married William MERRIAN.
William was born about 1626 in Tudeley, Kent, England. H e d ied 1689.
4 M iii Joseph BREED was born 1632 in Lynn, Essex Co., Massachuse t ts.
+ 5 M iv John BREED was born 1634.

Allen also married (2) Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard KNIGHT on 1656. Elizabet h w as born about 1610.
_________________________________________
Lamont-Eldredge Family Records
Author: Belle Eldredge Lamont
Call Number: R929.2 L234

Family records of descendants of William Eldred and Anne (Lump k in) Eldred who arrived in America in 1647
Bibliographic Information: Lamont, Belle Eldredge. Lamont-Eldredge Fami l y Records. N.p.,
1948.
Page 174
BREED
_________________________________________
History of Stonington, by Wheeler. Page 244.

Allen Breed, the progenitor of the Breed family, appears fir s t in Lynn, Mass. 1630.
Allen Breed1 was born in Eng. 1601; d. Mar. 17, 1692 and h a d 5 children; one was
Allen Breed2 (Allen1), b. 1626; m. Mary . . . . , and h a d 6 children;
one was
John Breed3 (Allen2_1), b. Jan. 18, 1663; m. 1st Apr. 2 8 , 1686
Mary Kirtland; m. 2nd June 8, 1690 Mercy Palmer, dau.
Page 174
of Gershom and Ann (Dennison) Palmer.
See Palmer
Page 175
_________________________________________
Principal facts of interest concerning the Breed family in America, wi t h the genealogy of the Stonington, Conn., branch
MEMORANDUM OF AUTHORITIES.
Record and Pension Office, Washington, D. C.
"Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors compiled from
the Archives, by the Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Boston: 1896. Wright & Potter Printers,
"Record of the Descendants of Allen Bread, who
came to America from England in 1630
Hathaway & Bros., Philadelphia, 1392.
Town Records, Stonington, Connecticut.
Town Records, Breedtown, Venango County, Pa.
Monuments in Family Burial Plots, Family Papers
Letters, etc.
COMPILED By JULIA BEEBE COATES
MYSTIC, CONN.
1900

(MEMORANDUM OF AUTHORITIES is a legal term meaning
the statement of facts are following. State your argument, cite
relevant statutes and cite case law to substantiate your argument.)

In the year 1200, many Hollanders emigrated to
England, and it was about that time that the town of
Brede in Sussex County was settled. The town now
contains a population of 1000, and covers five thousand
acres. The register of the town dates back to 1359.
In the church there are brasses with Latin inscriptions
to Robert Oxenbridge, dated 1487 and 1492. The
Afford family mansion, now called Brede Place, was
erected in the reign of Edward III. The Manor of
Brede was distinct from the Hundred of Hastings up
to the thirty-third year of Henry VIII.
The family spread over England, and we know
very little of their history until the time of Allen
Bread, who sailed with Governor Winthrop for
America. All of the family in this country are
descendants of this man and his first wife, who
brought two sons with them from England, Allen, b.
1626, and Timothy, b. 1626, and had two sons born to
them in Lynn, Joseph, b. 1632, and John, b. 1634.
The lists of those who received land are not
complete. It may be assumed that Allen Bread was
a stockholder, and emigrated at his own expense, as
he received 200 acres, 50 for each member of his
family, in 1635, when the town lands were divided by
a committee appointed "to lay out ffarrns." 
BREED, Allen Sr. (I5903)
 
246 ".... from a pedigree at Oxford, by Sir Thomas Phillips, m. Margaret , d au.
John Kibblewhite, of South Fawley, Berks, who was living in the 12th ye a r of
King Henry VII. Her Sister, m. William White , of Richmansworth, Herts , a nd
had a son, Sir Thomas White, by reason of which the Packers are record e d at
Oxford as Founder's Kin."
_________________
Much of what we know about the Packer family before 1850 comes from rese a rch done by Warren Packer from Evansville, Indiana. The following are e xc erpts from his letter to Richard Packer dated 27 Feb,1958. Philip Pa cke r arrived in Philadelphia on the Lion of Liverpool on 14 August 168 3 as a n indentured servant of Joseph Fisher. He had four years to serv e and wa s to receive 50 acres of land but no money at the end of his ind enture. T he Fishers were from Stillgorin, near Dublin, Ireland but we th ink that P hilip was from England. Two years later, 10 Sept 1685, Phili p married i n the house of Joseph Fisher in Philadelphia to Hannah Sessio ns, who wa s born 11 June 1665 in Oxfordshire, England. Her parents, Jame s and Ann S essions, were members of the Friends Meeting at Witney, Oxfor dshire, befo re coming to America. The next record of Philip Packer tha t we find was 1 0 Sept, 1689 when he was a yeoman of Philadelphia County . He was appointe d administrator of the estate of his mother in law, An n Sessions. The se cond wife of Philip Packer was Rebecca Jones, who cam e with her parents f rom Wales. She married 27 March, 1741. We do not kno w when Hannah die d . We do know that Philip Jr. was Hannah's son. Phili p Packer Jr., wa s born 1686 in Pa. He married in 1724 in Chester Co., Pa . to Ann Coates , daughter. of Peter Coates. She was born in Ireland, an d the family cam e to America as the result of the "war" against Protesta nts in Ireland. T he Coates family was Antibaptist. Philip Packer, Jr. , lived in New Jerse y and then moved to the head of Chester, in Maryland ., for a short time , finally going to the vicinity of Yellow Springs i n Chester Co. He die d in Pikeland Twp., Chester Co. He was injured in th e back in a sawmill a ccident and struck by a pitman (whatever that was ) so that in later year s he was feeble and walked with two staves. At on e time he lived with hi s son James in Uwchland Twp. , Chester Co. near D ownington. Later he live d with his son Moses, who was bound to support h is father and mother. An n live with her son Moses as a widow until he mo ved to York Co., Penn., a t which time she went to live with her son Jame s and died at the close o f the Revolutionary War. Philip Packer, Jr., wa s connected with the Frien ds Society in Burlington Co., New Jersey, an d later with the East Caln Mo nthly Meeting in Chester Co., Penn. Phili p and Ann had five children, amo ng whom was James. James Packer was bor n in Middlesex Co., New Jersey , 4 Feb,1726 . James died at Howard , Cent re Co., 10 Jan 1805, and is bur ied in the Old Packer cemetery near Howar d. He married at East Caln Month ly Meeting of Friends in Chester Co., 1J an, 1752 to Rose Mendenhall, wh o was born Chester Co., 4 August 1733 an d died at Bald Eagle, Jun 1824; h er parents were Aaron and Rose (Pierson ) Mendenhall. From various record s we find that James Packer went from N ew Providence Monthly Meeting to G wynedd, 30 Nov , 1750 and from Gwyned d to Goshen. The tax lists of Cheste r Co. show that he was in Pikeland t wp. 1765-1781. He was taxed in East C aln twp., 1767-1771. He evidently d id not live in Pikeland, as he was tax ed on property only and not on ani mals. In 1794 he was taxed on a mill i n Centre Co., Penn. In 1796 he wa s overseer of the poor in Bald Eagle twp ., which at that time was in Cen tre Co. The tax records Centre co. show t hat in 1801 he was taxed on 5 0 acres and 1 horse; in 1802 on 250 acres; i n 1803 on 200 acres, and aga in in 1804 on 200 acres. In 1808, Rose Packe r was taxed on 265 acres, a s she was in 1809 and 1810. The land record s of Centre Co. show that o n 19 Dec 1796 James Packer, Sr. received of Th omas Johnston ( who was hi s son-in-law) and James Packer Jr., 34 pounds , 9 shillings, for part o f the money due for a tract of land, 200 acres , mill, and sawmill. On 1 9 May 1800, James Packer, Sr., settled with Thom as Johnston for 200 acre s, gristmill, and sawmill, with James Packer, Jr. , present. Among the t hirteen children of James and Rose was James Jr. w ho was the father of G ov. William Fisher Packer and Aaron Packer. The bir th record of Aaron i s found in the Uwchland Monthly Meeting records a s 5 November 1764. He m arried Hannah Johnston, who died 1804, age 40, an d is buried in the Pack er cemetery. In the 1801tax list of Centre Co., Aa ron Packer was taxed o n 20 acres and 1 cow. In 1802, Aaron Packer, a blac ksmith, was taxed o n 25 acres, as he was until 1804. We do not find any r ecord of him afte r that time. Aaron and Hannah had six children, among wh om was Jehu Pack er. Jehu Packer ( in some of the records as John ) was b orn 15 Octobe r 1792 in Chester Co., Penn., and died in Howard twp., 31 Ja nuary 1852 . He married Sarah Lowe or Dow, who was born in 1793 and died 1 5 Februar y 1871, Dau. of Patrick Lowe or Dow. they are both buried in th e Packe r cemetery. His will is on file in Centre Co. I found him listed i n 183 0 census of Bald Eagle twp., Centre Co. as well as in the 1850 censu s o f Howard twp. He and Sarah had twelve children among whom was Maria, b or n 25 September 1827.Maria Packer , a daughter of Jehu and Sarah (Low e o r Dow) Packer. She was born 25 September 1827 and married Henry Glossn er . I don't have their marriage date. It is not known for sure why Jare d P acker was in the Glossner family. The brothers of Maria Packer Glossn e r were Job Way Packer, John Johnson Packer, Cornelius Lemborn Packer,Ja me s, William Nelson, All of these men lived much beyond 1850 and would n o t have left a son to be living in the household of their sister. In 18 8 5 Reuben Glossner was appointed administrator of Henry Glossner, lat e o f the Borough of Howard, Center co. with widow Maria. In order to so lv e the mystery of why Jared or (Jairus) was given the name Packer rathe r t han Glossner I wrote to his daughter Mrs. Guyer I received her repl y toda y 28 Feb 1958. She said that her father was buried seventy years t he four th of January at Howard. . She said that he was killed and that h e worke d in the woods as a lumberman. She also stated that his mother ga ve him h er maiden name which was Packer, for what reason she never heard . It migh t have been that he was born out of wedlock. The above was i n Family Tr ee Maker, CD Vol 1-1637. Much more information was gathere d from Famil y Tree Maker, CD Vol 4-2818. The information on the line fr om Jehu dow n to Zella was researched and entered by Daniel Ellis Howe. M uch of the i nfo was taken from: Linn's, History of Centre and Clinton C ounties Penns ylvania, 1883. The Packer information has also been check ed against th e information contained in a very fine book written by Donn a Smith Packe r titled "On Footings From The Past: The Packers in England ".

Children of THOMAS PACKER and MARGARET KIBBLEWHITE are:
i. MARGARET2 PACKER, b. Abt. 1488, Unknown; d. Unknown.
ii. ROBERT PACKER, b. Abt. 1490, Unknown; d. Bef. 1525, Unknown.
iii. THOMAS PACKER, b. Abt. 1493, Unknown; d. Unknown; m. JO A N RIDDLER, Unknown; b. Abt. 1499, Unknown ; d . Unknown.
2. iv. JOHN PACKER, b. Abt. 1496, Cheltenham, Gloucestershi r e, England; d. 1557, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
v. KATHERINE PACKER, b. Abt. 1500, Unknown; d. Unknown. 
PACKER, Thomas (I1586)
 
247 "Studied for awhile at Cambridge,but subsequently went to Oxford,whe r e he
matriclated as a member of Trinity College on March 13 ,1589-90....He be c ame
a great favorite at court.In vol.3, Familae Minorum Gentium,he is mentio n ed as
man very eminent for piety and wisdom,and the great patron of Dr. Presto n ."
"In August 1610 he was sent as envoy to Denmark...He had a grant on Ma r ch 23,
1614, of the office of Prothonotary of the Chancery for life;and in Ju n e 1615
he was acting as secretary to Lord Chamberlain Somerset, and was filli n g a
similar office for Lord Buckingham in 1616.He was granted an anual pensi o n of
115 pounds on March 7, 1617, from the Court of Wards on Surrendering a l i fe
pension from the exchequer and treasury of the chamber."
"As evidence of the social distinction he attained, Camden, in his Ann u ls,
says that the Marquis of Buckingham, Baron Haye, and the Countess of Dor s ett,
were sponsors at the baptism of one of his children (Philip) in Westmins t er
Church on June 24, 1618. He was now(1618)rich enough to buy from Lord Do r set
the Manor of Groombridge, in Speldhurst, Kent,...In 1625 he built Groomb r idge
Chapel in gratitude for the safe return of Charles, Prince of Wales, from
Spain,on which account it was afterwards called St. Charles Chapel,and e n dowed
with 50 pounds per annum."
"Charles pleased with his loyalty, granted him at his coronation, th e M anor of
Shellingford,which he had purchased in 1615 from Sir Henry Neville, whe r e he
occassionally resided".
"In 1628 he was elected member of Parliament for West Looe Cornwall, a n d in
1635 he was one of the Commissioners for investigating into the abuse s o f the
Fleet Prison."
"When Charles, in Mar 1639-40,asked those of his subjects on whose loy a lty he
thought he could rely for loans of money, Mr. Packer refused to comply w i th his
request , and forthwith allied himself with Parliament. He may have imbi b ed
sound constitutional notions from his friend, Sir John Elliot. His prope r ty
excepting Groombridge, was thereafter sequestered by the Royalist Forces . "
"He died in his house within the 'College of Westminster,'Feb. 15, 164 9 ,and
was buried on the Cloister, St. Margarets, Westminster...(In his will)He
bequeathed St. Charles Chapel and the Groombridge estate to his son Phil i p;
Shellingford to his son Robert;Donnington Castle House to his son Willia m , and
the Chilton Foliatt estate to his son John."
"On July 13, 1613 at St. Catherine Cree Church, he m. Philippi, b. 159 0 , of
the City of Westminster, dau. of Francis Mills, Esq., of Bittern,
Southhamptom." 
PACKER, John Clerk Privy Seal (I5625)
 
248 BIRT DATE ABT1756 CRANDALL, Asa (I519)
 
249 BURI PLAC (Safford Cemetery) Safford, Graham, AZ

_UID29BD146246CCD511B70D0020E0C2BF41DAE4 
PACKER, Mary Verona (May) (I47)
 
250 DEAT DATE 1844 (AGE 104)
____________________________
The following was copied from:
http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:31 8 2494&id=I810

Ferral Huntsman, Genealogy

BIG QUESTION: did William, John and James, or just one who named his chi l dren William, John and James go to Buffalo Tws. and settle it? See nam e s in Deeds below:
This info was from LaReah Toroto; Notes added BBF
Grantee deeds Nothumberland Co. PA

Book H. Page 235
Grantor; Abraham Kreibel
Residence: Co. of Montgomery, PA; Yeoman (Tawameoutin twp)
Grantee: William HUNTSMAN
Residing: Buffalo twp, Northumberland Co. PA
Date: 18 June 1795

Grantor finally agreed to sell land where HUNTSMAN lives to him. (How lo n g was William on land before then?) Denure entered into bewteen said pa rt ies bearing date of "4 Oct 1738" (This was the date when patent for th e l and was fist dated by the govenment) Buffalo twp.
Amount: 239 acres and 95 1/2 perches
Recorded 25 Nov 1795

Book G pg 514
Grantor: Abraham Kreibel and wife Susanna
Residence: Towamenein twp., Montgomery co., PA (this is the same twp a s a bove, different spelling.)
Grantor: John and James Huntsman
Residence: Both of Buffalo twp.., Nothumberland co., PA
Description: Phillips Thaal Situate in Buffalo Valley bearing date 15 Ju n e 1774 Patented.
Amount: Paid 1,000 pounds Intersting, Brittish money)
Acreage: 230 acres & 95 1/2 perches
to be divided in equal halfs betwen John and James Huntsman
Recorded: 25 may 1795
Indenture male, 3 Oct 1794

NEED TO LOOK AT LAND DEEDS, were they adjoined?

NOTE: Abraham Kreibel was German, maybe this was where they picked up t h e German lauguage and was able to intermingle with Wyrick families?

Book L pg 217
Grantor: James Huntsman Sr. and his wife Deborah; farmer
( Is this the first JAMES HUNTSMAN? Did the name come from mothers sid e o f family?)
Residence: both of Buffalo twp., Northumberland Co. PA
Grantee: David Myer; farmer
Residence; Cocoloco twp, Lancaster Co., PA;
Description: Patent Deed bearing date 7 Jan 1786 and in the Rolls Offi c e for State of PA. Patent Book no. 4, pg 181 on 26 may 1793 did grant u nt il a certain Christian Shafer, tract of land called the St. Miharls si tua te in Buffalo twp.

Acreage: 152 acres & 1 quarter--said tract was surveyed by virtue of a w a rrent granted to William McMichael 18 June 1773, who by deed, ated 11 F e b 1783 conveyed same to Christian Shafer and Christian Shafer by deed d at ed 17 April 1793 conveyed to James Huntsman, the present Grantor

Sold: for 427 pounds, 10 shillings, paid to James by David Myer for ---? - --
Acreage: 142 ares & 1/4 of above described land (he reserved 10 acre s o f said tract where SAMUEL JOHNSTON lived)
Signed: 21 April 1800 by James Huntsman and wife, Deborah (both signe d m y mark)
Recorded 1 May 1800

PA Archives Series #3 XXIII: #248, Northumberland Co. "Rangers on the
Frontiers" 1778-1783 includes James Huntsman, also listed as James Hernz m ann

James Huntsman's service was in the Revolutionary War in 1782. He serv e d in Capt. Joseph Green's Company of Rangers in the Militia of Northumb er land County. James Huntsman was issued a Militia Certificate No 4930 f o r 10 pounds dated 1 apr 1784 and Mar 1785 (info: Denice Edwards, July 2 00 4)

Northumberland Co. S3 Vol XIX James Huntsman
pg 75, 1772 Chestnut Hill Twp. Nich's Attamoss, laborer tax 12.0 s

pg 178, 1785 " " " " Altemores " tax 19.6 s
pg 384, 1788 " " " " Altemos "
also listed 130 acres 4 horses and 3 cows, Tax 14.2
pg 690, 1786 Buffalo Twp. 180 acres 3 horses 2 cows;
pg 769, 1787 " " 170 acres 2 " 3 "
CENSUS: 1790: Jeams Huntsman pg 183, Northumberland Co. Penn.
CENSUS: 1800: James Huntsman pg 828, Washington Co. Penn.

Son, Andrew & daughter, Mary, births listed in Huntsman Family Bible i n p oss. of L. W. Huntsman

Mary Snider also listed Birth 1790, Washington Co. PA (?)
I believe this James's father's John instead of James as some recds. ass u med.

one souce has LaGrange, Indiana, as death place another Ohio more resear c h needed.

William H Wilson 4 g son of James : FGS sources: PA Tax Recd 1785-87, Bu f falo Tws. & US Census 1790 Northumberland PA pg 183.

Revolutionary War-16 April/July 1780 Northumberland Company Militia
James was a big man - 250 lbs.
1787 James was a member of Cross Roads Presbyterian Church in Buffalo Tw p ,PA
1816 Settled Perry Twp., Richland Co, Oh Sections 21, 22, and 10

1820 lived Fayette Co., OH

(These were the only Huntman Deeds on file in Nothumberland Co., Pennsyl v ania) except:
Book M; page 118; James Huntsman Jr. , no wife named, sell his propert y , to John Wise, Law Attorney
to sell his property in Northumberland. James is now in Washington Co . P A dated 8 May 1802 james property is in Buffalo Twp.)

BORN: My original record indicated that he was born in Northumberland, P A , however the record that appears in the Ancestral File (AFN:4V7P-J9) i nd icates that he was born in England. That appears to be more correct.
_______________________________________________ 
HUNTSMAN, James (I489)
 

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