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James William HUNTSMAN

James William HUNTSMAN[1]

Male 1806 - 1867  (60 years)

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  • Name James William HUNTSMAN 
    Born 8 Oct 1806  Belmont, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    _UID A695B843A4BFD04AA5A05CC0C95FE4698913 
    Died 26 Feb 1867  Hebron (Enterprise), Washington, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 28 Feb 1867 
    Person ID I134  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father Jesse HUNTSMAN,   b. 1772/1780, Buffallo, Northumberland, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1836, Perry, Richland, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Mother Catherine CALL,   b. 1773, Nottingham, Washington, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Belmont, Ohio 
    Married 1790  Belmont, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 004E5A41D87B0948BF0EB2489F855D8C6155 
    Family ID F193  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hannah DAVIS,   b. 8 Feb 1816, Wayne Township, Jefferson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Aug 1902, Hebron, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Married 28 Dec 1831  White Pigeon, St. Joseph, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    _UID EDD8AEC4B7B90B4085531DEA041E070E0858 
    Children 
     1. Eliza Ann or Jane HUNTSMAN,   b. 26 Oct 1832, Stuben, Lagrange, IN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jan 1833  (Age 0 years)
     2. Sarah Jane HUNTSMAN,   b. 5 Apr 1834, Steuben, Indiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Mar 1917, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     3. Mary HUNTSMAN,   b. 1 Nov 1836, Lynn County, IA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jan 1922, Mesquite, Clark, NV Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     4. Joseph Smith HUNTSMAN,   b. 29 Dec 1838, , Caldwell, MO Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1921, Gunlock, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     5. Mariah HUNTSMAN,   b. 20 Feb 1841, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1922, Mesquite, Clark, NV Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     6. Hyrum Ralston HUNTSMAN,   b. 25 Feb 1843, Nauvoo, Hncck, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Feb 1926, Ferron, Emery, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     7. James Daniel HUNTSMAN,   b. 11 May 1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jul 1925, Mesquite, Clark, NV Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     8. Orson Welcome HUNTSMAN,   b. 31 Mar 1849, Pottawatomie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Nov 1931, Enterprise, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     9. David Orrin (Oran) HUNTSMAN,   b. 24 Jul 1851, Pottawatomie, IA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Dec 1907, Cane Springs, Clark, NV Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     10. Louisa Margaret HUNTSMAN,   b. 1 Apr 1854, Lakepoint, Tooele, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Nov 1854  (Age 0 years)
     11. Eliza Jane HUNTSMAN,   b. 1 Apr 1854, Lakepoint, Tooele, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1854  (Age 0 years)
     12. Aaron Davis HUNTSMAN,   b. 8 Jan 1856, Lakepoint, Tooele, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Dec 1935  (Age 79 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F91  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • James William Huntsman
      Find A Grave
      http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8742346
      Birth: Oct. 6, 1806
      Belmont
      Belmont County
      Ohio, USA
      Death: Feb. 26, 1867
      Hebron
      Washington County
      Utah, USA
      James William Huntsman was making lumber in Michigan when he met Hannah D avis, then about 15 years old. They married 28 Jan 1831 in White Pigeon , Mich. where there was a clergyman who could give them a proper marriage .

      About this time James William acquirred a Book of Mormon. They left LaGra nge County Indiana in 1834. He was baptised April 15, 1838 and she was ba ptised on July 15, 1838. See Hannah Davis' record of births of their chil dren to see where they were living at different times. In Nauvoo they ha d lot 3, block 64. They received their endowments in the new temple Janua ry 1, 1846, but were not sealed until 18 July 1853. He had labored as a c arpenter on the temple and was also a guard there. He also worked to buil d wagons when the people were so desperate to leave Nauvoo.

      After many of the church members were forced to sell their property in Na uvoo for very little, James William hired out to one of the newcomers. Th is was in order to earn money to outfit his family and leave Nauvoo. Firs t he shelled a great amount of corn, then he and other hired hands went t o the fields 12 miles east of the city to cut wheat. On their way to th e field one day, seven Mormons and a Gentile fellow worker were surrounde d by a mob of about seventy men who gave each one twenty lashes with a hi ckory whip. For more details see "Harvest Party" Comprehensive History o f the Church Vol.3 page 6. Also "Battle of Nauvoo" pages 14-15 same volum e.

      The Huntsman family had only a two-wheel cart and an old horse to move th eir things from Nauvoo. The good team, wagon and other possessions had be en stolen. The whipping occurred July 11, 1846 and they left in late Sept ember to spend the winter in Montrose, Iowa. They reached Council Bluff s in October, 1847 and spent some time building two good wagons and gathe ring provisions.

      David Orin was born here while James William and Sarah (at 17) were in Sa lt Lake Valley looking for a place to settle. James William decided to se ttle on ranch land in Tooele County. He worked around the city the winte r of 1851-52, then he traveled east to meet his family at Fort Bridger. T hey arrived in Salt Lake City on September 11, 1852.

      The older boys, 13 and 8, helped the Elders on the church farms on land b orrowed from Indians, to earn supplies to journey west. Their ox drawn wa gon left June 2, 1852 with 100 others. On reaching Tooele County they lea sed some cattle, sheep and horses to raise on shares. After about seven y ears these were returned as they had enough of their own.

      There was great demand for produce and dairy from their ranch from travel ers to California. Hannah made pie from prickly pear cactus. "Many a char acter came by on the way to California. A lone man on foot claiming to b e an evangelist stopped by for several days. He prayed on his knees for h ours, all for the redemption of this poor sinner Huntsman and family. Thi s finally got beyond Huntsman's endurance. One morning after being delaye d for breakfast,the father opened the back door, picked this "religionist " up by the pants and collar and slammed him 20 feet into the dooryard. W hen Hannah remonstated, "James William, you could have let him finish pra ying," James William replied, "He can do that as he goes down the road. " Quote from "Huntsman Annals"

      In the summer of 1853 the Huntsman family was called to head a colony i n Beaver Valley, but when the Indians began hostilities, the project wa s canceled.

      They boiled lake water to extract salt to sell. When Jacob Bastian, a shi pbuilder from Denmark, was rescued from the ??? handcart company he staye d with the Huntsman family. He spoke only Danish and James William only E nglish but they became fast friends. Soon they had a big sailboat on th e lake.

      The family was called to settle in southern Utah, at Shoal Creek with the ir sawmill. This they did although the trees were hard to get to and no t good quality. James William was called upon to divide the land in the l ittle valley into one and one-quarter acre plots. In doing this wintery p roject he soaked his feet in the marshy land and stayed up late at nigh t until he caught pneumonia. After about twenty-five days he died on Febr uary 26, 1867.

      Later the Huntsman boys all spent much time and labor on the St. George T emple.
      "Brother Huntsman, as he (Jacob Bastian) referred to James William, was b y nature the most tolerant, affable, good-natured, most thoughtful and co nsiderate, kind gentleman he had ever known. He was intellectually quic k to perceive, completely reliable, without guile, frank and fearless. H e had a complete faith in God and his authorized servants."

      Family links:
      Spouse:
      Hannah Davis Huntsman (1816 - 1902)*

      Children:
      Sarah Jane Huntsman Lewis (1834 - 1917)*
      Mary Huntsman Leavitt (1836 - 1922)*
      Joseph Smith Huntsman (1838 - 1921)*
      Mariah Huntsman Leavitt (1841 - 1922)*
      Hyrum Ralston Huntsman (1843 - 1926)*
      James Daniel Huntsman (1843 - 1925)*
      Orson Welcome Huntsman (1849 - 1931)*
      David Orin Huntsman (1851 - 1907)*
      Aaron Davis Huntsman (1853 - 1935)*

      *Calculated relationship
      Burial: Hebron Cemetery
      Enterprise, Washington County, Utah, USA
      Plot: #83
      Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
      Created by: Robin Adair
      Record added: May 11, 2004
      Find A Grave Memorial# 8742346








      The following experience occurred on July 11, 1846 near Nauvoo Illinois . Archibald Newell Hill's
      brother, John Hill recorded the experience. It was entered into Brigham Y oung's Manuscript History,
      p 230-32

      "I, John Hill, laborer of Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, do solemnly d eclare that on the tenth day
      of July inst., in company with Archibald N. Hill, Caleb W. Lyons, James W . Huntsman, Gardiner
      Curtis, John Richards, Elisha Mallory and Joseph W. D. Phillips I went ou t to a farm called 'Davis's
      farm,' about twelve miles distant from Nauvoo, in order to cut the whea t on said farm; we worked all
      that day and also on the Saturday morning until about nine o'clock, abou t which time a company of
      twelve men marched round the north side of the field, a company of betwee n fifty and sixty marched
      in from the west side of the field, and we also observed a company on th e East side of said field, thus
      hemming us in on every side, said companies were armed with guns, rifles , pistols, muskets, and
      bayonets. James Huntsman picked up a white handkerchief and went out to m eet them waving it as a
      signal of peace, the mob leader then called for a halt; Huntsman asked hi m what they were going to
      do with us he replied, 'You shall soon know,' they surrounded our wagon s and demanded to know
      how many six shooters or fifteen shooters we had; we replied, we had none . One man attempted to
      take Archibald Hill's gun, which he pushed a little out of his way, whe n the man wheeled round, took
      a pistol from his belt, and said, 'God damn you, I'11 blow your brains ou t, if you make any
      resistance,' they then took six guns from us, also four pistols, immediat ely afterwards they filed off,
      having us in their midst, took us up to Rice's house where the leader aga in called for a halt, they held
      a consultation, about eight or ten men were called out of the ranks, an d sent to the woods, in about
      half an hour they returned, each bringing with him from one to five hicko ry gads; they then called out
      John Richards and Elisha Mallory, and took them down by the fence to th e end of the field where we
      were at work about a half mile distant, where they were whipped in a ditc h, each receiving twenty
      lashes, they then returned and called for Lyons and Phillips who also rec eived twenty lashes each,
      they again returned and called for Archibald N. Hill, James W. Huntsman , Gardiner Curtis and
      myself and drove us down in a two horse carriage where I was taken out, p laced in the ditch on my
      knees with my breast on the bank, and a man wielded a large hickory gad w ith both his hands across
      my shoulders striking me twenty-one times, which disabled me from doing t he least service for myself
      for about a week.

      "After the other three had received their whipping, we were marched bac k again to the place from
      where we started, the mob then smashed four of our Runs on a stump and re turned the pieces to us:
      they kept two of the guns and all the pistols.

      "We were ordered to turn our two carriages round towards Nauvoo, when Jos eph Agnon told us
      'God damn you, leave for the holy city and not look back;' we started an d after having gone about
      fifty yards, I heard the report of a gun and a ball whizzed close by my h ead; after we had gone about
      a mile, we looked back and saw them separating into two companies.

      JOHN HILL

      "I, Archibald N. Hill, declare that the above is a true statement of fact s; and I know that old Whimp,
      Frank Lofton and John McAuley were three of the party engaged in whippin g the before named
      persons.


      http://www.centerplace.org/history/ch/v2ch23.htm
      THE year 1841 opened with fair prospects at home and abroad. Nauvoo had j ust been
      favored with a charter granting extraordinary privileges. Everywhere thro ughout the States
      and Canada the ministry were finding willing ears to hear the message, an d multitudes were
      becoming obedient. Nauvoo was growing as if by magic, numbering already s ome three
      thousand inhabitants. England, Wales, and Scotland had heard the sound an d were
      responding with unexampled enthusiasm and zeal; especially was this tru e of England.

      Under these circumstances, having just emerged from the dark cloud of Mis souri's
      oppression, it was but natural that they should feel glad, and thankfull y rejoice. Yes, it
      may be that some of them had then to an extent become arrogant, proud, an d boastful,
      neglecting to be as humble and devoted as they were under more adverse ci rcumstances;
      and it may be, too, that this proud spirit increased as their prosperit y increased. If so,
      it was but the outcropping of nature and what might reasonably be expecte d of any community
      similarly situated; but that they will compare favorably with any other p eople in similar
      conditions of which history speaks, must be conceded. This will be appare nt to a close and
      fair investigator.

      Sunday, March 21. The quorums of the Aaronic priesthood were organized b y Bishops
      Whitney, Miller, Higbee, and Knight. Samuel Rolfe was chosen President o f the Priests'
      Quorum with Stephen Markham and Hezekiah Peck as counselors. Elisha Evere tt, with J.
      W. Huntsman, James Hendricks, counselors, was chosen to the presidency o f the Teachers'
      Quorum. Phineas R. Bird, with David Wood and W. W. Lane counselors, to th e presidency
      of the Deacons' Quorum.

      May 2 1841 the Teachers' Quorum was organized in Nauvoo, Elisha Everett p resident, James
      Hendricks and J. W. Huntsman counselors.
      ______________________
      http://www.leavittfamilies.org/Docs.htm
      DOCUMENT 38 LAND CONSECRATION, JAMES WILLIAM HUNTSMAN

      [Copy of a microfilmed page, reference lost, probably in the land record s of Tooele County, page 54 - Lyman De Platt]

      James William Huntsman transfers to Brigham Young, recorded December 12t h , 1855.

      Be it known by these presents, that I James William Huntsman, of E[ast] T [ooele] City, in the County of Tooele and Territory of Utah, for and in c onsideration of the good will which I have to the Church of Jesus Chris t of Latter-day Saints give and convey unto Brigham Young, Trustee in Tru st, for said Church, his successors in office and assigns, all my claim t o and ownership of the following described property to wit: lot (8) Eight , in Block (6) Six in E.T. City plat, value Ten dollars $ 10. 0 0
      Lot (7), Block (2) two, containting eight four rods, also six acres
      on the west side of lot (1) one block (8), all in E.T. City farming
      plot, value, forty dollars $ 40.00
      Two oxen, one hundred dollars $100.00
      Three cows, seventy five dollars $ 75.00
      Three 2 year old hiefers, sixty dollares $ 60.00
      Four calves, forty dollars $ 40.00
      Eight sheep, forty dollars $ 40.00
      One waggon & tools, fifty dollars $ 50.00
      Household & kitchen furniture, weaving appalrrel [sic] &c &c
      two hundred dollars $200.00
      Total $615.00

      together with all the rights, privileges, and appurtenances thereunto bel onging or appertaining; I also covenant and agree that I am the lawful cl aimant and owner of said property, and will warrant and forever defend th e same unto the said Trustee in Trust, his successors in office, and assi gns, against the claims of my heirs, assigns, or any person whomsoever.

      [page 55]

      J. W. Huntsman [signed]

      Witnesses
      William Maughan [signed]
      Jenkin Williams [signed]


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------ - -------

      Territory of Utah, County of Tooele. I Peter Maughan, Recorder of said Co unty certify that the signer of the above transfer personally known to me , appeared this eleventh day of December A.D. 1855 and acknowledged tha t he of his own choice executed the foregoing transfer. Peter Maughan [si gned] [Original in Platt Family Records Center, Document 164]

      _UID71B9146246CCD511B70D0020E0C2BF411E28

  • Sources 
    1. [S37] Iowa, Pottawattamie County, Annotated Record of US Census, 1850.