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Harriet GUYMON

Harriet GUYMON[1]

Female 1851 - 1942  (90 years)

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  • Name Harriet GUYMON 
    Born 11 Nov 1851  Springville, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Initiatory (LDS) 25 Oct 1869  EHOUS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FSFTID KWNT-96X 
    _UID 42F0F5BDF75EEC488CE855BD7165A1DD4706 
    Died 18 May 1942  Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 19 May 1942  Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1535  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father Noah Thomas GUYMON,   b. 30 Jun 1819, Cumberland Ferry, Jackson County, Tenn., USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1911, Orangeville, Emery, UT, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years) 
    Mother Margaret Elizabeth JOHNSON,   b. 28 Feb 1820, Malahide, Elgin, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1900, Driggs, Teton, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 25 Nov 1845  Orangeville, Emery, UT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 56388531DFB11E4E82F2F7A114B2C5E0B7D1 
    Family ID F120  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hyrum Oscar CRANDALL,   b. 26 Apr 1844, LaHarp, Hancock, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Apr 1904, Driggs, Teton, ID Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Married 25 Oct 1869  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _UID 2066B75D42685B479C5CBABEEC614B180649 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United S tates.
    Children 
     1. Julia Euzell CRANDALL,   b. 7 Dec 1871, Springville, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Sep 1955, Price, Carbon, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     2. Hettie Margaret CRANDALL,   b. 9 Sep 1872, Springville, Utah, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1950, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     3. Myron Marcellus CRANDALL,   b. 2 Oct 1875, Springville, Utah, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 May 1951, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     4. Louis Eugene CRANDALL,   b. 3 Feb 1878, Springville, Utah, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 10 Jun 1880  (Age < 2 years)
     5. Adelaide Lucinda CRANDALL,   b. 3 May 1879, Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Feb 1953, Pasadena, L.A., CA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     6. Melburn Roslyn CRANDALL,   b. 18 Feb 1882, Huntington, Emery, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Feb 1952, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     7. Ralph Delos CRANDALL,   b. 18 Aug 1884, Huntington, Emery, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jun 1971, Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     8. George Ernest CRANDALL, D.D.S,   b. 16 Jul 1887, Huntington, Emery, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1931, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)
     9. Stanley Leroy CRANDALL,   b. 30 Jul 1890, Vernal, Uintah, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Sep 1942, Safford, Graham, Az Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F24  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • Source:`The Life Story of Hyrum Oscar Crandall" Compiled and
      published by Henry E. Miller 1994 page 121
      Harriet was a midwife who had taken her training under the famous
      Mormon physician, Dr. Elliot Schipp.

      HYRUM OSCAR CRANDALL & HARRIET GUYMON

      Family historians have recorded that Harriet Guymon greatly resemble d her father, Noah Thomas Guymon. This comparison is believed to be a ref erence to the facial features of her father.
      Harriet's heritage, of course, is contemporary with that of the peop le who joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Illinoi s and thereafter made their trek across the plains of this country to th e Great Salt Lake basin. Ht was born to Noah Thomas Guymon and Margaret
      Johnson Guymon on 11 November 1851, at Sprillgville, Utah. Noah and his f amily had migrated from Illinois to this territory in September 1850. The y arrived with the wagon
      train of the Aaron Johnson Company. Upon their arrival in the Salt Lake V alley eight wagons of this train were cut out by President Brigham Youn g of the Mormon Church and directed to
      proceed on to a valley fifty miles south of Salt Lake City. The Guymon fa mily went first to American Fork and spent one winter there, then proceed ed to the area the eight wagons had
      settled. They and others began the settlement that initially was named "H obble Creek." Later the settlement was named Sprillgville.
      Among the wagons (families) that were directed to proceed to this ne w area was that of Myron Nathan Crandall, the father of Hyrum Oscar Crandall who married two daughters of Noah Thomas Guymon, namely, Margaret G uymon and Harriet Guymon.
      In any sketch of Harriet Guymon's heritage one must, of necessity, i n the absence of specific data, make reference to the character of her fa ther. Noah Thomas Guymon has been
      characterized as a person of refinement, as a civic person who during hi s lifetime held numerous positions of trust and responsibility in the com munity and in his church. He was a
      member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He lived i n a day when friendship was often the highest law. He had many friends an d, indeed, his life seemed dedicated to the service of his fellow man.
      At this juncture (1851), Utah was a young land. American history wa s still in the making here. An early-day log fort arose in "Hobble Cree k " almost immediately to afford the first settlers protection from the I ndians and from the
      approaching winter. The area had a bounty of mountains, badlands, canyons , valleys and desert. In short, the area was a geologic showcase. This wa s the wide open west the Mormons did so much to shape. The experiences o f the settlers in Springville were peculiar to the pioneer way of life. T heir
      experiences were accounts of travel in covered wagons, accounts of India n battles, and otherwise the eking out of an existence that at times wa s barely subsistence level.
      The desert had not yet been tamed when Harriet was born into this ar ea one year after it was settled. The transcontinental telegraph did no t find a place here until ten years later, and the transcontinental railr oad was still twenty years. The vast open spaces forced Harriet and her c ontemporaries to maintain the rough, hardy way of life. Yet, slowly and i nevitably, a new advanced civilization was to develop during the lifetim e of Harriet. And it is in this context that Harriet's history must proce ed.
      Harriet Guymon was born into a frontier community that was only on e year old, more or less. Settlers were still in a subsistence level typ e of existence. Their wilderness had not been tamed as yet. To a large ex tent the people in Springville still under the surveillance of the Americ an Indian who was looking with disapproval at the inroads being made by t he white man upon his hunting grounds. Food and clothing had to be produc ed on the spot through the toil and ingenuity of the frontiersmen and wom en. This was the setting which encompassed the immediate existence of th e Guymon
      family.
      And it is interesting to note that Harriet was the third child i n a family of seven born to Noah Thomas Guymon and his second wife Margar et Johnson, but more interesting to note that she was amidst 21 half bro t hers and sisters born to
      Noah through his other three wives. Her full brothers and sisters are: Ma rgaret Elizabeth, Martin Lewis, Moroni, Julia Luella, Edward Wallace, an d Lillian M.
      Very few records exist pertaining to Harriet herself. Indeed the fo r mative years of her life must be deduced to a large extent from the his tory of the area in which she lived and from the movements of her family , both parental and
      immediate.
      Her father was a religious man. He served as counselor to Bishop Aar on Johnson for some ten years. He was a merchant, farmer and stock raiser . According to the history gathered by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers , Harriet'
      parental family was active in all the affairs of the
      Springville community, both civic and otherwise. In 1851, the year of Har riet's birth, the first peach trees were planted in Springville. The sett lers did not bring trees with them, but saved peach pits on their trek fr om the East to the West. The pits were planted and the trees produced fru it five years later. Naturally, the order of business of every family i n those days was to place land under cultivation for food and to build ho mes for shelter.
      The church house, of course, became the center of all activity. Thi s was particularly true in terms of social affairs. Peculiar to the time s was the fact that some of the early settlers went to church and to soc i al gatherings bare footed;his was not considered strange or unusual.
      These pioneers loved to mingle and be sociable. Family reunions and cele b rations were popular.
      The spring of 1856, following the grasshopper war, was one of scarci ty; many settlers went for months without tasting bread. However, bounte o us crops were produced in the
      Springville area the next season. The twenty-fourth of July always afford ed the Saints a reason and an excuse for celebrating the arrival of the S aints in the Rocky Mountains; it was a Thanksgiving celebration as well.

      (This was only 2 pages of her life story in the book. Her story continue s for 16 more pages)

  • Sources 
    1. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census, Ancestry Family Trees.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=33810113&pid=82

    2. [S10] Millennium File.