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Myron Hamilton CRANDALL

Myron Hamilton CRANDALL[1]

Male 1897 - 1962  (64 years)

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  • Name Myron Hamilton CRANDALL 
    Born 28 Nov 1897  Safford, Graham County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1910  Precinct 1, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1920  Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Initiatory (LDS) 27 Jan 1928  ARIZO Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1930  Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1935  Rural, Las Vegas, Nevada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1940  Supervisorial District 1, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 1EEB3EDE38513148878C52D4CD1B9BFDE0B0 
    Died 22 Nov 1962  Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 4, 5
    Buried 24 Nov 1962  Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Person ID I16  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 18 Feb 2019 

    Father Myron Marcellus CRANDALL,   b. 2 Oct 1875, Springville, Utah, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 May 1951, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Mother Clara Mabel PACKER,   b. 26 Jun 1878, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1929, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Married 22 Dec 1896  Safford, Graham, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 8, 9, 10
    _UID C26231EA41F9B8469026647C3C294B4F0C71 
    Family ID F18  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth MOODY,   b. 5 Dec 1896, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Mar 1987, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Married 11 Apr 1917  Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID C5ECB13C87EF5844A06A0FC6109BED5279A6 
    Children 
     1. Elton Francis CRANDALL, Sr.,   b. 16 Mar 1920, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1995, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     2. Gerald H. CRANDALL,   b. 3 Oct 1924, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 2016, Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)
     3. Joseph Rulon CRANDALL
     4. Myron Chester CRANDALL,   b. 29 May 1918, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1918, Bisbee, Cochise, Az Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     5. Lawrence Moody CRANDALL,   b. 29 Jul 1928, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Apr 2006, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     6. Norman Lewis CRANDALL,   b. 11 Oct 1931, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 2015, Apache Junction, Pinal, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Last Modified 19 Feb 2019 00:14:29 
    Family ID F4  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • Name: Myron Hamilton CRANDALL
      Given Name: Myron Hamilton
      Surname: Crandall
      Sex: M
      Birth: 28 NOV 1897 in Safford, Graham, AZ
      Death: 22 NOV 1962 in Mesa, Maricopa, AZ
      Burial: 24 NOV 1962 Mesa, Mesa, Maricopa, AZ
      Ancestral File #: 1PHT-Q8 LDS Baptism: 23 MAY 1908 Endowment: 2 7 JAN 1928 Sealing Child: 2 NOV 1900

      Note:
      Myron wrote three different life histories of himself that were very sim ilar to each other but yet a little different


      MY LIFE STORY.
      MYRON HAMILTON CRANDALL Mesa Ariz. 1961.

      My recollections of my earliest childhood days were of our trip to Wyomin g and of Pearce Ariz. when it was booming about 1900.
      Papa [Myron Marcellus] came to Arizona in 1888 with Hyrum Oscar and Grand ma Harriet together with the family of five boys and Aunt Addie.

      There was Papa who was the oldest then Melburn, Ralph, Addie, George Earn est, and Stanley Leroy. Two other sisters Hettie and Zell stayed in Utah . Papa who was Myron Marcellus went to Deming N.M. to work on the first c anal built in the Mimbres Valley. Grandpa only stayed about a year then h e went back to Utah and left grandma and the family to shift for themselv es.

      Papa and Ralph had to assume the responsibility of making a living for th e family. Papa worked on the Enterprise Canal for almost a year and too k the biggest part of his pay in stock. The canal was never finished an d all he had to show was a stack of worthless certificates. He drove frei ght teams for Jennings from Willcox to Globe, before the railroad was bui lt.

      Papa worked for Uncle Geo. Jacobson at the Saw mill in the Graham Mts. Pa pa was an expert with an axe, and I have never seen anyone who could cu t as much wood and as fast as he could, even when he was 70 years old h e could do as much work as any of us boys.

      Papa and Mama were married Dec. 22 1896 and I was born Nov 28, 1897 at La yton which is now Safford. Floyd was born 2 years later. We went to Wyomi ng to work on the Union Pacific R.R. with Uncle Leslie Crandall. We wen t with team and wagon and Uncle Mell went with us. I remember how cold i t was when we got up around Flagstaff, I recollect that Uncle Mell slippe d on the ice and how bloody his face was. I remember that they had to bre ak the ice on the Green River so they could dip up the water in buckets t o fill the tank wagon which was backed down into the stream.

      On the return trip it was slow traveling, as the horses were in poor cond ition after working all winter on the railroad grading. Uncle Mell painte d a sign on the side of the wagon with tar---GILA OR BUST. After they go t back as far as Flagstaff they were at the end of their resources and ha d to wire Grandpa Packer for enough money to travel on. Then was when Mel l put another sign under the first one which said---BUSTED BY HELL. Unc le Ralph came almost to Globe with fresh horses and we were sure glad t o see him.

      About 1900 we went to Pearce when it was a booming Silver camp and Papa d rove 20 horse teams for Harry Clifford, from Cochise to Pearce. It used t o take all day to make the trip with 3 wagons and 20 horses. I went wit h Papa sometimes and he would let me hold the Jerk Line which handled th e 20 horses. 1 jerk was for right with a GEE, and 2 jerks with a Haw fo r left. He hauled oil and timbers as well as all the other things neede d in the Commonwealth Mine. I remember how we used to stop at the halfwa y place where they always stopped to oil the wagons. They would oil all t he cups that were up and then pull up a half turn on the wheel and oil th e rest of them. I remember how the blacksmith who was called Frenchy Guit ard would let me sit on the bellows while he pumped it to blow the fire t o heat the wagon tires So they could shrink them so they would go on th e wheels.

      I remember the Chinaman who run the store and bake shop. Mama would sen d me to the store to have my jar filled with yeast and the Chinaman woul d take the lid off the yeast crock and fill the jar sometimes after skimm ing off a few flies, which had somehow or other had gotten into the yeast . Then I would take a few sips on the way home.

      I can almost still hear the stamp mills pounding away day and night grind ing the ore from the mine. We lived in a tent with a 50 gal. barrel in th e corner which the Mexican water haulers would fill from the canvas bag s on the burros.

      Papa would go to the stables and grain and harness the horses before brea kfast, then after eating he would turn the horses out and they would al l go to their places on the chain to be hooked up. The Leaders, wheeler s and pointers, all knew their places and in a very few minutes the team s were ready and Papa would get on the seat and picking up the black snak e whip would crack it like a shot gun and with a loud 'Hi Ya' would be o n his way.

      We went to Bisbee about 1902 and Papa went to work in the mines. After w orking 2 or 3 years there he clerked and drove delivery wagon for Anders on and Cull. He was an expert driver and sometimes needed all of his expe rience in getting out of tight places on the steep and narrow places on t he hills of Bisbee. After a while his yearning for teams of his own cause d him to buy a transfer wagon and team.

      I remember the first horses he had. They were Ned and Bill. Bill got pneu monia and died, then Papa bought another horse named Frank. He run a deli very wagon for several years and I remember the picnics we used to go on , over the divide, it was called in the early days. Louis Moon and his wi fe, Mary used to go with us. Then sometimes we would go to the Huachuca M ts. and camp in Ramsey Canyon.

      About this time I got my introduction to my first Primary class. It was i n Layton, we were staying with Grandpa Packer and mamma sent me to Primar y with a new hat and I remember that the teacher gave Willard Welker a wh ipping and I ran home without my hat and Mama had to go over to the schoo l house and get it.

      I still remember the Sunday Schools they used to hold at our house in Bis bee, before they had a church house. Some times I would go to the Josephi te Sunday School. I remember how we used to sing "Catch the Sunshine" to gether with all the motions involved in catching it.
      In 1906, they put the street cars in Bisbee. I rode on the cars the firs t day they ran and was in Bisbee in 1918 when the street cars were discon tinued. I went to Lincoln School in Tombstone Canyon. I remember the firs t day. I drew a rabbit and to make it look natural I put a lot of dots un der it. My teacher showed the picture to Vessa Merrill, and in that way i t got to my mother who thought it was true to life as I knew rabbits.

      When I went to Central School in School Hill in down town Bisbee. I was b aptized by John McCrae in 1906 in a mine flume in Lowell. Two years late r they decided that my first baptism was not legal because Bro. McCrae ha d not stood in the water with me, so in 1908 when the church was starte d in Tombstone Canyon they rebaptized me and so now I have two baptisma l certificates on two different dates. 1906 and 1908. Just about tha t time electricity was coming into use and Papa surprised Mama when she w ent on a visit to Safford by having the house wired, when she returned w e had it all lit up.

      I remember the big fire on Chihuahua Hill when almost all of the houses w ere burned off. Uncle Stan was staying with us and I remember that he loo ked like a negro when he came home after fighting fire all afternoon. I n the summertime there would be cloudbursts and the water would roll dow n off the canyon, before the subway was put in, Then all of the kids woul d have a seldom used chance to take a swim.

      We would hike all over the hills around Bisbee and I got my first experie nce with giant powder. One day when one of our gang had his hand blown o ff with a firecracker made with a short piece of powder with a shorter fu se. I always respected dynamite after that. I have used powder many tim es since then, in the mines, prospecting and when I worked 5 years at Bou lder Dam I was powder man and helped set off many big blasts all withou t accident.

      About 1912 we moved back to Safford and Papa bought the Caveness 40 and w e farmed there for several years. At the age of 13, Grandpa Packer lear ned me to lay bricks and I laid up a brick cellar which is still standin g at Lone Star on which is now the State Experiment farm. I remember ho w the lime ate my hands. I have often wished that I could lay bricks a s neat as Grandpa could. He laid many of the first houses in the Gila Val ley. He was born in Nauvoo in 1841 and crossed the plains when he wa s 7 years of age.

      His name was Alonzo Hamilton [Packer] and that is where I got the name o f Hamilton. I went to school at Lone Star in 1912 and most of the pupil s were large and rowdy. We had 6 teachers that year because the women tea chers couldn't control the outlaws. Finally Colton Wanslee took over an d with the aid of a hefty leather strap, he restored order then and there . In 1913, I went to Safford and Graduated. I went to Safford Hi the fi rst year the new school was built then the next year I went to Gila Acade my. I went there for 3 terms but did not finish as the war started. I wo rked for the railroad as warehouse man and later as baggage and express m an.

      In 1916 the National Guard went to the border at Douglas and all of my fr iends who were a year older than me went to the duty. I and Vernon Foot e went to the border and stayed with the Safford Company for about two mo nths. Then I came back to Safford and drove Stage from Safford to Pima . We ran a steam thresher for 4 years, and I was engineer the last year . I owned a Model T Ford car and was one of the few who had a car then . I owned a motorcycle before that and I was the scourge of all the farme rs who had teams on the road. I would scare their horses then leaving a t rail of dust and cussing behind me. The roads were not paved then and th e chuck holes were apt to throw you off at any time.

      In 1917 I married Elizabeth Moody. That was the best thing I ever did an d now, 1961 we have been married 45 years.
      Papa sold his farm and we moved to the Salt River Valley.
      I went to Bisbee and worked in the mines for a year. Our first baby wa s a month old when we went there and he died about a month after I went t o work there. His name was Chester Myron. Then Elizabeth's father die d at Thatcher and we went back to Gilbert and farmed for several years.

      The Depression started in 1929 and I lost everything trying to make a for tune in Long staple cotton to pay for the high priced land and never wa s able to regain enough capital to start farming

      again. I ran a service station at Main and Mesa Drive for a year and wen t broke there when the Depression started and so decided to go to Boulde r Dam where I worked 5 years. I worked on Jack Hammer work for about thr ee months and then went on as cement mixer operator on the stone mason cr ew. We built all of the rock walls there then I went to work on pipe gan gs for 2 years. I worked on cement work after that. I worked on all th e tunnels, the spillways and in the towers.

      The depression years were tough and the wages there were poor. I got $ 4 a day at first then got raised to $4.50. One day our crew had just lan ded on the Arizona side at the High Line landing when we saw a box of pow der burning. One of the mn picked it up and was going to carry it away a nd we all hollered for him to throw it down and run, he did and was onl y a few feet away when it went off.


      II- LIFE STORY BY ME - MYRON HAMILTON CRANDALL
      My earliest recollections are of the time we spent in Pearce Ariz. Papa w as driving twenty horse teams for Harry Clifford, hauling supplies from C ochise and Willcox on the Main Line Railroad. It was 20 miles from Cochis e to Pearce and it took him almost all day to make the trip. I used to ri de with him sometimes and he would let me hold the jerk line when the roa d was straight and smooth. I remember when we would stop to oil the wheel s. He would oil all the cups that were up and then would pull up a few fe et and oil the rest of them.

      We lived in a tent across the street from the blacksmith shop and I use d to go there and set on the bellows while the blacksmith pumped it. I re member the water barrel that set in the corner of the tent and the Mexica n would come with his burros and empty water into the barrel with a canva s hose. I remember the Stamp Mill that ran day and night grinding the si lver ore from the Commonwealth Mine. I remember the Chinamen who ran sto res in Pearce. Later they went to Tombstone and Gleeson and became famou s in the history of Tombstone. (Ah Lum and Wah Kee)

      Mama used to send me to the Chinamen's to buy yeast and I remember the Ch inaman skimming the flies off from the yeast jar. Then I would drink abou t half of it before I got back home.

      I remember when Papa and Uncle Mell went to Wyoming to work on the Unio n Pacific Railroad. Uncle Leslie was a contractor and did a lot of the g rading near Green River Wyoming. I remember going with the tank wagon an d we would back down into Geen River and the man would fill the tank wit h a bucket. I remember Uncle Mell slipping on the ice and making his fac e bleed. On the way back Papa, Mama and Mell with me and Floyd ran shor t of Provisions and Mell painted a sign under the "Gila or Bust " Sign o n the side of the wagon saying 'Busted by Hell'. Uncle Ralph came out p art way to Globe with fresh horses and helped us back to Safford.

      We went to Bisbee shortly after the turn of the century.
      I remember the street cars were put in, in 1906. I rode on the first ca r to come up the canyon, and I was in Bisbee in 1918 when they tore up th e car lines. I went to school in Bisbee when Vessa Wright started teachin g. My first teacher was Miss Messenger and I remember my first art lesson s were of a rabbit and I placed dots under it to make it look realisti c I guess. We lived up Tombstone Canyon and Papa used to work for Anderso n and Cull Grocery. Later we moved across the canyon above Ruffs place an d near Lewis Moon. Papa went into the transfer business for several year s until we went back to Safford about 1912 and bought the Caveness place.

      I remember the picnics we used to go on over the divide. (Now a tunnel ru ns under the old divide.) I remember the first meeting in the Bisbee Ch urch house. Howard Warren and I used to be janitors and we would fill th e Baptismal Font and go swimming sometimes. It was a tank about 4 feet wi de and high and about 7 or 8 feet long. Papa was Sunday School Superinten dent and Uncle John Warren was Bishop.

      We went to Safford and started farming and the old place is all gone exce pt for a brick cellar which Grandpa Packer showed me how to build. I wa s 13 then and I remember how the lime mortar ate holes in my hands. Grand pa Packer used to visit us often and I have since wished that I had learn ed more of the History of Safford from him. He was a brick Mason and I h ave often wished that I could lay brick as neat as he did.


      My first schooling was at Lone Star and most of the pupils then were larg e and rough. One year we had 7 different teachers on account of the roug h tactics of the rowdy pupils. Then Colton Wamslee came and he had a stra p off from a harness. He called it his beaver tail. It was slashed on t he end and boy you knew when he hit you that your back would show stripe s and welts. One day all of the boys were going to gang him when he trie d to whip "Les" Montierth, but he overcame the situation by going home a nd getting a six shooter which he placed on his desk with the admonitio n that he would shoot the ears" off the first one who tried anything else . That ended the rough stuff and he had control from that time on.

      I went to school in Layton for 1 year and when I got to the 8th grade I w as the only 8th grade pupil, so I went to Safford and graduated in 1913 . Then I went to Gila Academy at Thatcher 3 different years but usuall y I wouldn't go for long because the teachers were too strict for me . I am ashamed of the things I used to do and used to get called to th e office too many times. I met many friends then and some of my classme n have made quite a name for themselves. Spencer (W) Kimball was in th e class ahead of me and has always been a friend who never forgets me whe n he sees me.

      We used to run a steam thresher for 4 or 5 years. I ran the Steam Engin e and was considered quite an accomplished mechanic at that time. Late r I worked for Ariz. Eastern R.R. in Safford as Warehouse Man.

      I married Elizabeth Moody in 1917 after a whirlwind courtship. I ha d a Red Ford Model T and was one of the few who owned cars then. I als o owned a Yale Motorcycle and was the scourge of the farmers with teams a nd wagon. I would scare their hoses then leave a trail of dust and cussin g behind me. I had several narrow escapes from falls caused by soft road s and 'chuck' holes.

      We went to Bisbee to work in 1918 when the folks moved to Salt River. I w as the champion "Mucker" there, having set a record of 57 cars in one shi ft. Our first baby, Chester Myron, died while we were in Bisbee and wa s buried there.


      Lizzie and I went back to Mesa in 1918 and farmed for the next 10 years . We were not very successful as farmers or the times were too hard for u s to ever get started farming.

      I ran a service station in Mesa in 1929. I went to Boulder City in Augus t 1931 and worked there until 1935. I worked on the stonemason crew fo r 2 years and then worked on pipe gangs and cement crews. We got $4.0 0 a day and were lucky to hold our job because there were so many men ou t of work. I was about 30 feet from a box of dynamite which got on fire f rom a cigarette thrown into it. When it went off I was knocked down and h ave been increasingly hard of hearing ever since.

      I ruined my health working there and had an ulcer attack about 1934. The y took me to the hospital and kept me for 2 or 2 days then they turned m e out and I had stomach trouble from that time on. I had several narrow e scapes while working there. I saw several men killed beside me but I wa s always lucky. There were 89 men killed dead on the job end several hund red more died in the hospital. If a victim was alive when he arrived at t he hospital he always died of pneumonia or something else just to keep th e death rate down.

      They called it Hoover Dam but the men who worked there said it should hav e been Hoosier Dam because a man was a "Hoosier" to work there. A far cr y from today when the men at Page Dam are on strike for a $6 a day subsis tence pay on top of their regular wages. More pay in one day then we go t for a week.

      The church had a branch in Boulder City but I didn't get to go much. Liz zie went quite a bit to Relief Society and Church Meetings. There were m en from all over the U.S. working there. There were quite a few Mormons f rom Utah and Arizona there. Las Vegas was sure a rough and tough place t hen. We called it "Lost Wages" then.

      Elton went to school in Las Vegas during his freshman year.
      All four of our boys used to hitch hike to the river and go swimming. C alled Lake Mead now.

      We didn't accumulate any wealth there and when we came back to Mesa in 19 35, things were sure tough. I got a job at Stewart Mtn. Dam running jac k hammers for $6.00 a day and thought that was wonderful. Then I worked a t Bartlett Dam for a year and at Mormon Flat and Horse Mesa Dam. I wa s a carpenter then and had charge of the "Form" building on those 3 dams . I worked at Morenci when they built the new smelter and shops at Midway . I also worked on housing projects that at a later date. I helped buil d the big smoke stack at Morenci. I worked on 16 different army camps an d prisoner of war camps. I worked at Huachuca, two years, at Florence P . O.W. camp at Luke and Williams Fields. Also air bases at Kingman.

      I went to Nevada one winter on a housing project. It was the coldest pla ce I was ever in and we spent most of our days over a fire and spent th e nights beating soot out of the oil burner stoves. We would wake up i n the night with our tent full of smoke then we would have to get out an d take the stove pipes off and beat the soot out of them. We had guard s with us all the time for security reasons as the camp was a critical de fense job. We were fingerprinted and photographed just like prisoners . Had to have a pass to even go to the Commissary. I worked at Parker o n the dams; there also the Jap prisoner of war Camp.

      Then there were the days of the W.P.A. and P.W.A. relief jobs. We got $1 .00 an hour then and worked 40 hours a week. We usually had about $20.0 0 1eft after our board and room and deductions were taken out. The Work s Progress Administration as it was called went by the name W.P.A. whic h meant "we piddle around". Then there were the C.C.C. camps and I worke d on several camps in Arizona. They were run by the army under army disci pline and inefficiency. They brought boys from all over the Eastern citie s and gave them $16.00 and board a month and with clothes thrown in. At F lagstaff, I bought 16 pairs of pants from the boys for 25 cents a pair a nd all the shoes I wanted thrown in.

      I followed construction work for about 20 years and have become quite se t in my rough and ready ways. I smoked cigarettes for 30 years and then w hen my stomach got so bad I quit them. But I have a hard time staying of f of coffee. I was raised on it for 30 years and find it is the worst en emy I have. I never got the liquor habit very much, but used to like bee r and used to help the boys drink it up to keep them from getting so drun k. But I have overcome my smoking and drinking habits and I always ha d a testimony of the gospel with me. There was a long time I didn't ge t to do much in the way of church work especially during the times I ha d to go away to get employment. But I always came home on weekends and we nt to Sunday School and Church when I could. I worked in the Mutual at Gi lbert and was always willing to do what they wanted to do as Ward Teache r etc. I was ordained an Elder in 1928 and in 1957 was ordained a High P riest. I have always had faith and my prayers have been answered many tim es. Especially 3 times when I was about dead from loss of blood from stom ach ulcers.

      In 1946 we went to Safford and bought the Old Olney home from Dave Ridgwa y. We stayed there until 1955, when we came back to Mesa. I had an operat ion on my stomach in 1953 at El Paso by Dr. J.H. Hinton. I have had pret ty good health since then but have been handicapped by bad health for 2 0 years. Many months have I laid off because I couldn't work on account o f my affliction. I am now 62 and if the Lord wills I hope I can make ou t for a while yet.

      We built 2 houses in Mesa but had to sell them to keep going. 'We moved o ut to Superstition 2 years ago and I helped build the new l2th Ward Churc h. We did the best we could and when times would get hard the Lord help ed us to keep going. We had 4 of our boys- Elton, Jerry, Joe and Larry i n the Navy at one time in 1944. Norman was in after that for 4 years. Non e of our boys got a scratch from their service and very lucky to get ou t so well.


      III MY HISTORY

      My earliest recollections of my childhood days were of Pearce Ariz. abou t 1900. My father drove 20 horse teams for Harry Clifford, from Cochise t o Pearce. My father, Marcellus came to Arizona from Utah in 1888 with m y grandfather Hyrum Oscar Crandall and the family. My father was the olde st. The Melburn, Ralph, Adelaide, George Ernest, and Stanley Leroy. Hetti e and Zell stayed in Utah. They went to Deming New. Mex. and worked on th e Mimbres Valley canal the first one built in that valley. My grandfat her only stayed for a year or two then he went back to Utah and my fathe r had to take the lead in making a living for the family.

      He worked on a canal called the Enterprise and took most of his wages i n stock certificates. The canal was never finished and all he had to sho w for his work was worthless paper. He drove freight teams for Jennings f rom Willcox to Globe. He was an expert with an axe and even when he was s eventy years old he could cut more wood and quicker than anyone I ever sa w. He worked for Uncle George Jacobson at the Sawmill in the Graham Mts . He married Clara Mabel Packer at Layton. I was born there Nov. 28 , 1897.

      My brother Floyd was born 2 years later. We went to Pearce and Papa drov e teams for Harry Clifford from Cochise to Pearce bringing in oil and sup plies for the Commonwealth silver mine. I remember incidents that ha ppened at Pearce such as going to the blacksmith shop and the blacksmit h would let me sit on the bellows while he pumped it up and down to blo w the fire to heat the wagon tires. I remember the Chinamen who run the s tores and bake shops. My mother would send me to the Chinamen’s for ye ast and I remember how they would take the cover off the crocks and fil l my jar. They didn't charge any extra if there were a few flies in it . I can almost still hear the stamp mills pounding day and night crushin g the silver ore.

      We lived in a tent with a 50 gal. wooden barrel in the corner which Mexic ans with burros would fill with water from canvas bags. Papa would go t o the stable and grain and harness the 20 horses then after breakfast h e would turn the horses out and they would go to their places on the chai n, the leaders, the wheelers and pointers all knew their places. All of t he horses were handled with a single line. Jerk line it was called. Pap a would crack the blacksnake whip with a loud "Hi Ya" would be off. "Gee ' and a jerk" meant right and "haw with 2 jerks" meant left. A steady pul l and "Whoa" would stop them. I used to go with him some trips and I reme mber how they would stop at halfway to oil the wagon axles. All the cup s that were up would be oiled then they would pull ahead a half turn of t he wheel and the rest would be greased.

      We sent to Wyoming one winter to work on railroad grading with Uncle Lesl ie who was papa's half brother. Uncle Mell went with us and it was sure c old around Flagstaff and on northward. I remember how they had to break t he ice on Green River so they could full the tank wagon with water dippe d up with buckets. On the return trip the horses were in poor condition a nd it was slow traveling. I remember crossing the Colorado at Lees Ferry . They took the horses first and then the wagons. Uncle Mell painted a si gn on the side of the wagon, GILA OR BUST. On the return trip they were o n short rations, the horses were all worn out and Mell painted another si gn under the other one, BUSTED BY HELL. Uncle Ralph took fresh horses an d met us just out of Globe and Mell said they were sure glad to see Ralp h with the new horses.

      We sent to Bisbee right after we left Pearce and Papa went to work in th e mines there, that was about 1900 and papa had to get back with the onl y trade he knew and so after mining for two or three years he bought a te am and wagon and went into the transfer business. He also worked for Ande rson and Cull as clerk and delivery man with a team and wagon and his exp erience with horses stood him in good stead there.

      I remember the Sunday School they used to hold at our house. In 1906 th e city of Bisbee put in the street cars. I rode on the cars the first day . I was working in the mines there when they tore up the car tracks and w ent to using busses. I went to Lincoln School in Tombstone Canyon at firs t then went to Central School in downtown Bisbee until 1908. I was baptiz ed by John McCrae in a mine flume in Lowell. As the flume was not large e nough for Brother McCrae to stand in the water with me I was rebaptize d 2 years later when the church acquired a church house and had a baptism al font there. Just about that time electricity was coming into use and p apa surprised Mother by having electric lights when she returned from a v isit to Safford.

      I recollect the big fire on Chihuahua Hill when all the houses above Brew ery Gulch burned. Uncle Stan was staying with us then and he fought fir e for several hours with mine pumped water. He looked like a negro when h e came home.

      In the Summer there were occasional big floods down Tombstone Canyon befo re the Subway was put in and all of the kids would have a big time wadin g in the stream after the water went down a little bit.

      After the new church house was put to use I and Howard Warren were the ja nitors and I hope we were not being sacreligious (sic) by our filling th e baptismal tank and swimming to our hearts content. Uncle John Warren w as Bishop and papa was Sunday School Superintendent. We used to go on pic nics over the Divide toward Tombstone with Lewis Moon and others of our r elatives and friends.

      All of the kids ran all over the hills around Tombstone Canyon and I go t my first experience with giant powder with our gang making big fire cra ckers from short pieces of powder with about three inch fuses. We would l ight them and toss them down the hill and wait for the explosion. Mike Ke ating held one too long and it blew off most of his hand. I handled lot s of powder afterwards in the mines and at Boulder Dam on the tunnels an d spillways but I always respected powder and never had any more incident s with it.

      About 1912 we moved to Safford and papa bought the Caveness place and w e farmed there for several years. At the age of 13 Grandpa Packer showe d me how to lay bricks and I laid up a brick cellar which is still standi ng on the Lone Star State Experiment Farm. I remember how the lime morta r ate my hands. I have often wished that I could lay bricks as neat as Gr andpa could. He laid many of the early houses in the Gila Valley. He wa s born in Nauvoo Ill. in 1844 and crossed the plains with the Pioneers wh en he was seven years old. He died in 1917 and I was one of the pallbeare rs.

      I went to school in Lone Star in 1912 and most of the pupils were too lar ge and rowdy. One year we had six different teachers because the teacher s couldn't control the outlaws. Finally Colton Wanslee took over and rest ored order with a big strap which he called his Beavertail. I went to Saf ford High in 1913 when I graduated from the eighth grade. I went to Saffo rd High the first year it was built. It went to Gila Academy for three ye ars. Spencer Kimball was in school there then. Some of the teachers tha t I liked was John F. Nash and Heber Larson.

      We run a Steam Thresher for 4 years and I learned to run it well enough t o be the engineer for the last Summer. I worked for the railroad 2 year s as warehouseman and baggage man . I married Elizabeth Moody April 14, 1 917. That was the best decision I ever made and now in 1961 we have bee n married for 44 yrs.

      I had a Ford car then and was one of the few who owned a car then. I owne d a motorcycle before that and I was the scourge of all the farmers who h ad teams on the road. I would scare their horses then leave a trail of du st and cussing behind me. The roads were not paved then and the chuck hol es were apt to throw you at any time.

      We moved to Salt River in 1917. I went to Bisbee when our first baby wa s only a month old. He died in 1918 from locked bowels. His name was Ches ter Myron. I worked in the mine as a mucker and I set a record of 57 car s in 8 hours. We stayed there 1 year then went back to Mesa.


      Mostly by Myron Michael Crandall
      Mcrl@cox.net

      With minor corrections by carol ann
      Norman’s middle name is Lewis not Louis
      Lawrence is born in Mesa, not Gilbert
      Chester Myron NOT Myron Chester for baby…
      Gerald H not Hamilton

      · Change Date: 11 MAR 2002 at 00:00:00

      Father: Myron Marcellus CRANDALL b: 2 OCT 1875
      in Springville, Utah Co., UT ,USA
      Mother: Clara Mabel PACKER b: 26 JUN 1878
      in Brigham City, Box Elder Co, UT, USA

      Marriage 1 Elizabeth MOODY b: 5 DEC 1896
      in Thatcher ,Graham, AZ, USA
      · Married: 14 APR 1917 in Thatcher, Graham Co, AZ,
      · Sealing Spouse: 27 JAN 1928
      Children
      1. Chester Myron CRANDALL b: 26 MAY 1918 in Gilbert, Maricopa, AZ
      2. Elton Francis CRANDALL b: 16 MAR 1920 in Gilbert, Maricopa Co, AZ
      3. Gerald H CRANDALL b: 2 OCT 1924 in Gilbert, Maricopa, AZ
      4. Joseph Rulon CRANDALL b: 11 SEP 1926 in Gilbert, Maricopa, AZ
      5. Lawrence Moody CRANDALL b: 29 JUL 1928 in Mesa, Maricopa ,AZ
      6. Norman Lewis CRANDALL b: 11 Oct 1931 in Gilbert, Maricopa, AZ.

      Descents from John Howland (Mayflower)and Elizabeth Tilley
      JOHN HOWLAND
      (b. 1592; md
      Elizabeth Tilley)
      |
      DESIRE HOWLAND
      (b. abt Feb 1625-26;
      md John Gorham)
      |
      MERCY GORHAM
      (b. 20 Jan 1658;
      md George Denison)
      |
      ELIZABETH DENISON
      (b. 11 Sep 1689-90; md
      Christopher Champlin)
      |
      JOSEPH CHAMPLIN
      (b. 4 Aug 1709;
      md (2) Mary Noyes)
      |
      JOSEPH CHAMPLIN
      (b. abt 1765;
      md Mercy Sisson)
      |
      WILLIAM SISSON CHAMPLIN
      (b. 16 Apr 1794;
      md Mary Ring)
      Angeline Avilda Champlin
      Margaret Emma Champlin
      |
      Alonzo Hamilton Packer
      |
      Clara Mable Packer
      |
      Myron Marcellus Crandall
      |
      Myron Hamilton Crandall

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    7. [S39] Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Or iginal data - Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfil m publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau , Year: 1910; Census Place: Precinct 1, Graham, Arizona; Roll: T624_39; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 0048; FHL microfilm: 1374052.

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