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Francis Winfred MOODY

Francis Winfred MOODY[1, 2]

Male 1858 - 1919  (60 years)

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  • Name Francis Winfred MOODY 
    Born 26 Aug 1858  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    _FSFTID KWC7-683 
    _UID FF70F62B2D1FBC4DA620108F62B237BB50A3 
    Died 18 Aug 1919  Thatcher, Graham, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Thatcher, Graham, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I22  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father John Monroe MOODY,   b. 16 Feb 1822, Ashville, St. Clair, Alabama, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 1884, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth POOLE,   b. 3 Sep 1838, Manchester, Lancaster, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Apr 1918, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 23 Jan 1856  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 442E6B497C08674DB65087089D9C84EE9ED4 
    Family ID F36  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Malinda Gimlin LEWIS,   b. 10 Sep 1866, Minersville, Beaver, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1903, Central, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Married 7 Nov 1882  St. George, Wshngtn, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    _UID F888F9E4631B6548800E249FFEE075DC08A4 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married St. George Temple, St George, Washington , UTAH.
    Children 
     1. Francis Winfred (Winnie) Jr. MOODY,   b. 21 Sep 1883, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Sep 1954, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     2. Samuel Lewis MOODY,   b. 12 Dec 1884, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Nov 1968, Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     3. Edward Lewis MOODY,   b. 16 Sep 1886, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Apr 1983, Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 96 years)
     4. Ida Katurah MOODY,   b. 8 Jan 1888, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Nov 1977, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     5. Unice "Eunice" MOODY,   b. 25 Apr 1889, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1889, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     6. John Monroe MOODY,   b. 28 Jun 1890, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Sep 1891, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     7. Glenna MOODY,   b. 7 Dec 1892, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1985, Fullerton, Orange, California, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     8. June MOODY,   b. 9 Jun 1895, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Feb 1978, San Jose, Graham, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     9. Elizabeth MOODY,   b. 5 Dec 1896, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Mar 1987, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     10. Joseph Rulen MOODY,   b. 7 Nov 1899, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jul 1979, Rosewell, Chaves, New Mexico, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     11. Malinda MOODY,   b. 9 Jul 1903, Central, Graham, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Nov 2003, Grants Pass, Josephine, Oregon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 100 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F9  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • !SOURCE: THE JOHN WYATT MOODY FAMILY Past and Present Published by Dr. Th omas Moody Family Organization Inc. President, E. Grant Moody 1424 Sout h College Avenue Tempe, Arizona 85281 Copyright 1985
      pages 543-545
      FRANCIS WINFRED MOODY
      Son of John Monroe Moody & Elizabeth Pool Moody
      Francis Winfred, son of John Monroe and Elizabeth Pool Moody was bor n August 26, 1858 in Salt
      Lake City, Utah. While a very small child he suffered from seizures tha t threatened his life. Through the administration of his father and sever al elders, he matured to manhood with no further incident.
      In the fall of 1861 when the family moved to Dixie, Winfred was thre e years old. He stayed with his
      mother in Pine Valley until 1863 when his family moved to St. George.
      At age 14 in 1872 he accompanied a friend to Salt Lake City. The boy s passed through the empty town of Panguitch, its inhabitants having rem o ved to a fort because of an Indian raid by one of the bands of Indian s wh o refused to stay on a ration, but roamed Utah and Idaho trying t o g et enough food to stay alive.
      Winfred helped build the temple. He hauled cobble rock for the found ation, then dressed rock from the
      quarry on the west side of St. George. He was present at its dedication b y Brigham Young.
      He saw Brigham Young and George A. Smith when they would come to Dix ie. The Sunday school children
      used to go and welcome them, cheering from both sides of the road. Presid ent Young would bow and smile at
      them as he passed, then the band and the children and the other settler s would fall in behind the carriage.
      In the spring of 1879, Winfred went to Provo to attend the Brigham Y oung Academy. He said goodby to
      his family and girl friend, Miss Eunice Renbow Carter. He remained in sch ool two terms. Then his father wrote asking him to come back. His brothe r John was in Europe on a mission, and John Monroe was having a hard
      time supporting the family without Winfred's help. Winfred had intended t o finish school, but never got another opportunity.
      When the Moodys moved to Arizona, Winfred followed some days later . He took time to call on Miss
      Carter, to whom he had previously given a ring. He told her he'd come bac k in two years, then hurried to catch
      up with the others.
      But Winfred didn't go back for Miss Carter; he fell in love with Mal inda Gimlin Lewis, 16, whom he met
      at the first Founder's Day Celebration of Smithville, picking her out a s the most beautiful among a group of
      girls coming down the street. On September 21, 1882, they started for S t . George, Utah to be married; his
      journal describes the trip.
      There were 34 persons in the party which included his father John Mo nroe, Malinda's sister Laura, who
      was to become the plural wife of Peter McBride, and Malinda's mother, Sar ah Jane Huntsman Lewis, who, as Winfred ruefully reported, carefully supe rvised the association of Malinda and Winfred but paid little heed to
      her older daughter and already married Peter. Malinda experienced poor he alth for the entire trip. suffering
      from chills and fever, thought to be malaria.
      The group went by way of Snowflake to attend their stake conference . From here. John Monroe and some
      others returned home, while those in the wedding group traveled northwar d to Lee's Ferry on the Colorado
      river. The group separated, some went directly to St. George via Kanab, b ut Winfred's party went by way
      of Panguitch (the former home of the Lewis family) and Cedar City. Malind a's illness put a cloud over the festivities in St. George. However, fina lly the long desired day came, it being the 7th of November 1882.
      Winfred and Malinda were married by temple President John D. T McAllister . He learned that his brother
      John, who had returned to St George from his mission, was keeping compan y with his former fiance Miss
      Eunice Carter.
      Winfred regreted being unable to see his aged Aunt Dorinda Slade i n Pine Valley, but they decided to return
      November 9, 1882, coming by way of Pipe Springs and Kanab. In Sunset, Ari zona they were invited to stay
      for conference and help with the music. "We also ate at the long table a s they all lived in the Order" under the direction of Lot Smith. They pas sed through the Apache Indian Reservation and arrived in Smithville (Pima )
      on December 8, 1882. When they returned home, there was a wedding recepti on at his father's flat-roofed
      adobe house, the first party of its kind in the valley of the Gila River.
      Winfred was 24 when he built a small house for his new wife. There s he bore her first two sons; three
      more boys and six girls were to follow. Winfred supported his family prin cipally by farming. The railroad
      had not yet been built, so in 1881 Winfred began periodically hauling fre ight from Wilcox and Bowie and
      San Carlos and Globe, Arizona. This provided some needed cash. Although t his route cut through the Indian Reservation Winfred never carried a gu n thinking that an Indian would kill him as quickly for his gun as
      for any other reason.
      The restive Apaches would occasionally "break out" of the reservatio n plundering and killing. At one time,
      his wife Malinda was alone with her four small children when she heard th at the notorious" Apache Kid" had broken out again. Frightened, she walke d at night through the brush two miles, avoiding the public road, to he r mother's house.
      Suddenly the five of them were surrounded by the sounds of the ratt ling of several rattlesnakes. Not being
      able to turn back. Malinda offered a prayer. picked up the smallest child , Ida. lined up her three barefoot boys behind her. and walked safely thr ough.
      Winfred and Malinda became the parents of 11 children. nine of who m lived to adulthood. Except for a few years in Central. they lived in Th atcher in a brick house with two large rooms and a porch on the front. Wh en Malinda's mother had to cive with them. Winfred moved the porch to th e back and made a kitchen out of
      it so that they would have more room. One day Grandma Lewis backed up t o the fireplace and her clothes
      blazed up. Winfred put out the flames with his bare hands. but she died o f the burns.
      The first Thatcher L.D.S. Church services were held under a bowery a t Bishop John Monroe Moody's
      home June 3 1883. At one time Winfred served concurrently as Sunday Schoo l superintendent. ward clerk. counselor to bishop Samuel Claridge and a s a member of the ward choir. In 1892 he began six years as stake
      clerk under Christopher Layton. missing only one meeting during this assi gnment. While freighting he would
      often travel late into the night in order to not miss a meeting. He ofte n found it necessary to use his personal journal for ward and stake recor ds. (The L.D.S. Church Archives. Salt Lake City. Utah now holds this larg e
      diary which contains also the diary of John Monroe and Elizabeth Pool Moo dy.)
      Winfred was completely dedicated to his Savior and His earthly kingd om. Someone said that the reason he
      was so poor was the time spent discharging his duties and in being strict ly honest in paying his tithing and
      taxes. But he felt secure in the Lord's love and watchful care.
      Winfred worked on public projects such as constructing the Central a nd Union irrigation canals with their
      brush and rock diversion dams in the river. On October 18, 1886 he bega n assisting in making adobes for and whitewashing a schoolhouse. His cas h contribution of nearly $100 was next to the highest made toward the
      $700 project.
      His journal states that once he returned home from work to find Mali nda suffering from chills and a raging
      fever. Sister Lee annointed her and Sister East administered to her. as w as the custom in that day.
      In 1892 he obtained a patent to his homestead in Thatcher. In 1894 h e sold a sixty foot right-of-way
      through his land to the railroad for $100. Instead of this going to disch arge debts. it was used to assist his
      cousin William A.Moody to go on a mission to Samoa.
      Malinda and Winfred were constantly called upon as practical nurse i n the community. On March 28
      1903, when she was 37 and expecting her eleventh child. Winfred wrote tha t Malinda, "wore herself out
      waiting on the sick. a work she loved." suffering from pneumonia as wel l as fatigue. She gave birth to a baby
      girl July 9. 1903. A nurse at $2 a day, daily visits by a doctor. and Win fred's own care helped her to recover
      from the childbirth but not from her lung infection. "She died on July 28 . 1903. If ever a woman was prepared
      to die. she was. She did not fear death. but would have liked to have liv ed to see her family raised."
      Winfred was again in financial difficulty. He had built a fine $360 0 brick home on his Central farm which together with costs of sickness re quired him to mortgage both of his farms. Furthermore, insects and drough t
      had produced crop failures, but his faith and commitment to the Lord's wo rk remained undaunted.
      Sometime prior to 1907, Bishop William A. Moody had prevailed upon W infred to provide nursing care
      for Brigham Stewart and family who were near death. The promised help wa s not forthcoming, requiring
      Winfred to be on constant duty for 51 days until the family could care fo r themselves. This placed a severe
      strain on Winfred who himself had not healed from a recent circumcision , consequences being exema on his
      hands and cancer in his surgical wound.
      As drowning men are want to grasp at any straw, on February 5, 1913 , "I left for Los Angeles, California
      to be cured of a cancer I had for seven years."The medical quack took fro m him $800 plus 564 hospital cost. Francis returned home in April. Later , he returned again to Los Angeles and on December 2. 1913, "the doctor
      again started to kill my cancer." After six weeks Francis returned home a nd here his journal ends.
      Excruciating pain continued: after being bedridden for awhile, Winfr ed departed this world August 18, 1919.
      His life had been one of devotion and selfless service. He had followed t he creed, "If business interferes with
      your church duty, then get rid of your business," and, "If someone has t o get cheated in a business deal. I'd
      rather be the one cheated than the one doing the cheating."

      _UID53B9146246CCD511B70D0020E0C2BF410048

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] Web: Arizona, Find A Grave Index, 1861-2011.

    2. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census, Ancestry Family Tree.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=33810113&pid=38

    3. [S13] 1900 United States Federal Census, Year: 1900; Census Place: Precincts 1, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, and 13, Graham, Arizona Territory; Roll: 45; Page: 28B; Enumeration District: 0021; FHL microfilm: 1240045.