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Thomas LORD

Male 1585 - 1678  (93 years)


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  • Name Thomas LORD 
    Born 1585  Towcester, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _UID 5625E8E53BE8B246A6B333C2EC20FA5B1272 
    Died 1678  Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I5968  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Family Dorothy BIRD,   b. 25 May 1588, Towcester, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1676, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 23 Feb 1610/23 Feb 1611  Towcester, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 980177DBA168A14C984BBFC7FE869F35A251 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married 23 Feb 1610/23 Feb 1611
    Children 
     1. Richard LORD,   c. 5 Jan 1611/5 Jan 1612, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Ann LORD,   b. 18 Sep 1614, Towcester, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1688, Stonington, New London Co., Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     3. Thomas LORD,   c. 15 Nov 1616, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. William LORD,   b. 27 Dec 1618, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1678, Saybrook, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     5. Robert LORD,   c. 12 May 1620, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. John LORD,   c. 21 Jan 1623/21 Jan 1624, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Aymie LORD,   c. 30 Nov 1626, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. Dorothy LORD,   c. 1 Jul 1629, Petersborough, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jan 1657, Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 27 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F1914  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • !Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Lord
      Author: Kenneth Lord
      Call Number: R929.2 qL867L
      Thomas Lord was an original proprietor and
      founder of Hartford, Conn., in 1636.
      THOMAS LORD I

      THOMAS LORD was born in 1585, son of Richard and Joan Lord
      of Towcester, County of Northton, England.

      Thomas Lord (1) married February 23, 1610-11, Dorothy Bird, daughter
      of Robert and Amy Bird of Towcester, England.

      The records of the St. Laurence Church, Towcester, show that Dorothy
      Bird was baptized May 25, 1588.

      There is also a record on page 25 of the ancient Marriage License Book
      of Petersborough (near Towcester), England, of the marriage license
      issued to Thomas Lord and Dorothy Bird on February 20, 1610-11.

      The Towcester Registers, 1561-1633, give the following baptisms:

      Richard Lord, baptized Jan. 5, 1611-12.
      Anne Lord, " Sept. 18, 1614.
      Thomas Lord, " Nov. 15, 1616.
      William Lord, " Dec. 27, 1618.
      Robert Lord, " May 12, 1620.
      John Lord, " Jan. 21, 1623-24.
      Aymie Lord, " Nov. 30, 1626.
      Dorothy Lord, " July 1, 1629.
      Thomas Lord was a man of means, position and
      influence, and in 1632 he sent his eldest son,
      Richard, then about twenty-one years of age, to
      America. He settled at Newtown, Mass., which
      afterwards became Cambridge. In 1633, Governor
      Haynes and The Rev. Thomas Hooker, friends of
      Thomas Lord, sailed for America with about two
      hundred passengers important to the colony, and it
      is thought possible that Richard Lord went in
      advance in order to select a place to settle.

      From Hotten's "Original Lists," we learn that "on
      the 29th of April 1635 were registered for
      transportation from the port of London to New
      England, in the ship 'Elizabeth and Ann,' of which
      Capt. Robert Cooper was master, Thomas Lord,
      aged fifty; his wife, Dorothy, aged forty-six; and
      their children Thomas, aged sixteen; Ann, aged
      fourteen; William, aged twelve; John, aged ten;
      Robert, aged nine; Aymie, aged six; and Dorothy,
      aged four." They landed in Boston and joined
      Richard Lord at Newtown. The ages of the
      children as given on the ship's register are probably
      only approximate, as they vary from the actual
      baptismal records.

      In 1636, with his entire family, Thomas Lord joined
      the party of Rev. Mr. Hooker and Mr. Stone and
      one hundred men, women and children, which took
      its departure from Newtown to form a new
      settlement on the Connecticut River.

      "They traveled more than a hundred miles, through
      a hideous and trackless wilderness to Hartford.
      They had no guide but their compass; and made
      their way over mountains, through swamps,
      thickets and rivers, which were passable with great
      difficulty. They had no cover but the heavens, and
      no lodgings but such as nature afforded them.
      They drove with them one hundred and sixty head
      of cattle and subsisted by the way on the milk of
      their cows. Mrs. Hooker was borne through the
      wilderness on a litter. The people generally carried
      their packs, arms and some utensils. They were
      nearly a fortnight on their journey. This adventure
      was the more remarkable as many of this company
      were persons of figure, who in England had lived in
      honor, affluence and delicacy, and were strangers
      to fatigue and danger. Gov. Haynes and some
      others did not appear in the colony until 1637."
      (Trumbull's Memorial History of Hartford.)

      It was early in June when they reached their
      journey's end. Their first labor was to prepare their
      dugouts in the hillside and provide shelter for their
      cattle. They had for some time been close friends
      and neighbors in Newtown and were already
      organized as a church, had been members of
      townships and were familiar, therefore, with action
      as a body. They agreed to purchase territory jointly
      and afterwards parcel it out, and Mr. Samuel Stone
      and Mr. William Goodwin were appointed, in
      behalf of the proprietors, to treat for land with the
      tribe of Suckiage Indians, of whom at this time
      Sequassen was the Chief Sachem. In this they
      were successful and soon purchased a large area.
      It is not known what they bartered--probably cloth,
      axes, knives, etc. That a consideration was given,
      that it was increased when Sequassen confirmed the
      grant and was enlarged again when his heirs and successors
      renewed it "to near the value the land was esteemed at
      before the English came into these parts" is apparent
      from the deed of renewal itself. As soon as acquired,
      the land was distributed to the new proprietors.

      Thomas Lord thus became an original proprietor
      and one of the first settlens of Hartford. He lived
      on the north side of the highway on the bank of the
      Little River (now Wells Street), a near neighbor of
      Gov. Haynes, Rev. Mr. Hooker, Mr. Goodwin,
      Gov. Wyllys and others of the prominent
      inhabitants. His sons, Richard and Thomas, had the
      lots next to his. The Hartford settlers were largely
      people of some culture cast into raw conditions,
      and there was a mingling of high breeding and
      rough life.

      Neither the date of death nor the place of burial of
      Thomas Lord (1) is known. There is an entry on
      the Hartford Town Votes, under date of January
      29, 1643-4. The Governor, Mr. Hooker, and
      several others, including Thomas Lord, Sr., and his
      son Thomas, were freed from "Common worck in
      the hyway" for the next three years. As this is the
      last reference to Thomas Lord, Sr., in the volume,
      it might be conjectured that he died shortly after
      that time. ("The Founding of New England," by
      Ernest Flagg.) The land records of Hartford show
      that Dorothy Lord owned lands as early as May
      29, 1651, and that on March 7, 1652, she sold some
      land to Richard Goodman, and according to the
      laws in effect at that time (see Epaphroditus
      Peck's "The Property Rights of Husband and Wife
      under the Laws of Connecticut") a wife could not
      make contracts while her husband was living. The
      graves of Dorothy Lord and quite a number of
      descendants are in the graveyard in the rear of the
      First Church of Hartford, and the names of
      Thomas Lord and his son Richard are inscribed on
      the granite monument as among the first settlers.
      Dorothy Lord died in 1675 at the age of 86, and
      her will, dated February 8, 1669, is now on file
      among the probate records in the Connecticut
      State Library at Hartford, and is as follows:

      (Her will is in her notes.)