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Samuel LEWIS

Samuel LEWIS[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

Male 1829 - 1911  (81 years)

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  • Name Samuel LEWIS 
    Born 27 Oct 1829  Franklin, Simpson, Kentucky, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Gender Male 
    Immigration 1847  Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Dec 1847  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1850  Great Salt Lake county, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1 Jun 1850  Great Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1851  Parowan, Iron, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Initiatory (LDS) 13 Oct 1852  EHOUS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation Stonecutter 
    Residence 1860  Beaver City, Beaver, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1910  Thatcher, , Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FSFTID KWNR-V7Z 
    _UID A9172529C5A93541A3980D46D3DBBA00E81B 
    Died 31 Aug 1911  Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 5, 10
    Buried 7 Sep 1911  Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 8
    Person ID I61  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father Tarlton LEWIS,   b. 18 May 1805, Pendleton, Anderson, South Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1890, Teasdale, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Mother Malinda GIMLIN,   b. 21 Mar 1811, Burkesville, Cumberland, Kentucky, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jun 1894, Richfield, Sevier, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 27 Mar 1828  Simpson, Kentucky, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID C35C82B2EE6D5A43B4715E19321392FAB8F7 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married , Simpson, KY.
    Family ID F90  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah Jane HUNTSMAN,   b. 5 Apr 1834, Steuben, Indiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Mar 1917, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 1 Jan 1854  Parowan, Iron, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 10
    _UID B4754A5AC557BF47AEC31FCD501FD0D9643D 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States.
    Children 
     1. Samuel Edward LEWIS,   b. 17 Jul 1854, Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jul 1932, Zuni, McKinley, New Mexico, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     2. Orson James LEWIS,   b. 18 Dec 1855, Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1861  (Age 5 years)
     3. Mary Ellen LEWIS,   b. 9 Mar 1859, Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Dec 1929, Saint Johns, Apache, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     4. Oliver LEWIS,   b. 4 Mar 1861, Minersville, Beaver, U Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Mar 1947, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     5. Adalbert LEWIS,   b. 17 Nov 1863, Minersville, Beaver, U Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 1935  (Age 71 years)
     6. Laura LEWIS,   b. 16 Jan 1865, Minersville, Beaver, U Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Dec 1954, Pima, Graham, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     7. Malinda Gimlin LEWIS,   b. 10 Sep 1866, Minersville, Beaver, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1903, Central, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
     8. Joseph Tarlton LEWIS,   b. 30 Jun 1868, Minersville, Beaver, U Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1890  (Age 22 years)
     9. Sarah Lavira LEWIS,   b. 16 Jan 1870, Minersville, Beaver, U Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1960, Globe, Pinal, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     10. Lula Jane LEWIS,   b. 22 Apr 1873, Panguitch, Garfield, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Nov 1946, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     11. Bertha Maria LEWIS,   b. 5 Apr 1875, Panguitch, Garfield, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Apr 1962, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     12. Keturah Hannah LEWIS,   b. 10 Sep 1857, Parawan, Iron, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Apr 1939, Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     13. Berthaneriah LEWIS,   b. 5 Apr 1875, Panguitch, Garfield, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Oct 1940  (Age 65 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F38  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • THE LIFE OF SAMUEL LEWIS, AS TOLD BY SEVERAL OF HIS GRAND CHILDREN
      Assembled by Laura McBride Smith

      Samuel Lewis, the oldest son of Tarlton Lewis and Malinda Gimlin Lewis wa s born in Simpson Co. Ky. Oct. 27, 1829. Nothing is known of his life a s a child. It is so bad to think as long as we, his grandchildren, have l ived aruond him and all the chances we have had, we were so thoughtless a s to not ask him more about his childhood. What did he do? Did he go to s chool? Did he work on a farm? How old was he when he let his whiskers gro w so long? What color was his hair when young? Did he ever go with anothe r girl but grandma? Was he good to help his mother in the home? Did he le arn to use the spinning wheel and work in the wool? And a dozen other que stions. But most of the answers are buried in the grave with their earthl y remains and the rest is in another sphere that doesn't give us much inf ormation. We will try to assemble all we can get and hope it will be of i nterest to his future posterity.

      Tarlton Lewis moved with his family from Ky. to Macopin or Mecopin Count y after their girl, Mary was the baby, and in 1836 he was baptized into t he Church of Jesus Christ by his brother Benjamin Lewis. He became one o f the great builders of the city of Nauvoo, where the family located. Bef ore they located there, they settled at a place called Haun's Mill whe r e they went through the terrible massacre which is written in the live s of Samuel's father and uncle's histories. He remembered well of the bul lets flying around his head like peas. That's all, only he wonders why h e escaped. He might have ran to the woods with Joannah and her children a nd s tayed in the forest until morning, coming back to witness the deat h and burial of her husband. Anyway, Grandfather came out whole and wel l and went with his parents to Commerce, ILL., later Nauvoo, where his fa ther worked on the great temple from start to finish Although Samuel wa s only 11 years old, he commenced cutting stone for the Nauvoo Temple. Ta rlton Lewis had a good home in Nauvoo but after all the mobbings and terr ible killings and whippings they endured, they prepared to leave. They we re not to retalliate when whipped as they would give they enemies a reaso n to do more, but to take their punishment with trust in the Lord and aft er th e Temple had been dedicatted, they, with many more Mormons, receive d their baptisms, endowments and sealings. I make this clear as it had be en said there might have been no sealings done in that Temple, but Tarlto n and Malinda had all their work done in that Temple, according to the re cord we find on them.

      Samuel left the beautiful city with his parents and camped with them on t he prairies of Council Bluffs, and Mount Puisgi, After they had settled i n Council Bluffs (so one account records) they endured hardships in the c old. The next morning after they had crossed the river, Tarlton and his s on, Samuel, crossed back and went through the Temple, climbing the stair s and looking over the city and taking a last look at the dear home and T emple. It is said, several men went there the next day, were caught and b eaten by the mobs. The terrible beatings, burnings, whippings and attack s on women can't be realized by us after all these years, only those wh o experienced it can appreciate the freedom they found in the west a lon g time later.

      It was while the Lewis family was camped in Winter Quarters that Samuel v olunteered to enlist in the Mormon Battalian, under the command of Corp . St. George Cook, for the United States Government. Samuel was too youn g for such a career and he signed up as 18 years and he wouldn't 18 year s old until 1847. He signed up July 16, 1846, so he lacked more than thre e months of being 17 when he enlisted. It is said his father was so worri ed about it that his hair turned grey almost overnight. They were askin g for men from 18-45. It was such a blow to these Saints to sacrafice s o much after being driven from all they had in the world in such hard cir cumstances. Why should they go fight for their country when their countr y had denounced them. This was supposed to be a free country and thousand s of

      Another different life story of Samuel Lewis found on the internet
      http://ourfamilyheritage.blogspot.com/2011/07/samuel-lewis.html

      Samuel Lewis
      Samuel LEWIS (Battalion boy) Tarletons Oldest Son
      Samuel Lewis, the oldest son of Tarlton Lewis and Malinda Gimlin Lewis.

      Tarlton Lewis moved with his family from Kentucky to Macoupin County afte r their first girl, Mary, was the baby, and in 1836 Tarlton was baptize d into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints by his brother, Be njamin Lewis. He became one of the great builders of the city of Nauvoo , where the family located. Before they located there, they settled a t a place called Haun's Mill where they went through the terrible massacr e which is written in the lives of Samuel's father and uncle's histories.

      Samuel remembered well â€the bullets flying around my head like peas †. He wondered why he escaped. He might have ran to the woods with as man y as could escape and stayed in the forest until morning.

      Anyway, Samuel came out whole and well and went with his parents to Comme rce, Illinois, later Nauvoo, where his father worked on the great templ e from start to finish. Although Samuel was only 11 years old, he commenc ed cutting stone for the Nauvoo Temple. Tarlton had a good home in Nauvoo , but after all the mobbing and terrible killings and whippings they endu red, they prepared to leave.

      They were asked not to retaliate when whipped, as that would give their e nemies a reason to do more, but to take their punishment with trust in th e Lord, and after the Temple had been dedicated, they, with many more Mor mons, received their baptisms, endowments, and sealings.

      Samuel left the beautiful city with his parents and camped with them on t he prairies of Council Bluffs (so one account records) they endured hards hips in the cold. The next morning, after they crossed the river, Tarlto n and his son, Samuel crossed back and went through the temple, climbin g stairs and looking over the city and taking a last look at the dear hom e and Temple. It is said; several men went there the next day, were caugh t and beaten by the mobs. The terrible beatings, burnings, whippings, an d attacks on women can't be realized by us after all these years, only th ose who experienced it can appreciate the freedom they found in the wes t a long time later.

      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-y3_bn18-OTQ/ThFXAitDK2I/AAAAAAAAAL4/GeF8hOeiMp4 /s1600/Mormon%2BBattalion%2BMemorial.jpg
      It was while the Lewis family was camped in Winter Quarters that Samuel v olunteered to enlist in the Mormon Battalion, under the command of Corp . St. George Cook, for the United States Government. Samuel was too youn g for such a career and he signed up as 18 years and he wouldn't be 18 ye ars old until 1947. He signed up July 16, 1846, so he lacked more than th ree months of being 17 when he enlisted. It is said his father was so wor ried about it that his hair turned gray almost overnight. They were askin g for men from 18-45. It was such a blow to these Saints to sacrifice s o much after being driven from all they had in the world and in such har d circumstances. Why should they go fight for their country when their co untry had denounced them? This was supposed to be a free country and thou sands of people from Europe had sailed for America for religious libert y and found it, but these poor Mormons; what was their future? It looke d very black. Still they loved their government, and would fight for it a nd even with the awful state of existence they volunteered.

      Samuel marched off on a trip that was worse than what he had just experie nced. Brigham Young promised the men, if they obeyed orders and lived th e Gospel of Jesus Christ, as they had been taught, keeping out of bad com pany and say their prayers, they would not have to fire a gun and would c ome home safely. So there were 500 men volunteered, leaving their familie s to the mercy of heaven and earth and themselves, and they suffered much , but the trek across the plains began and we find that in another histor y.

      Samuel marched with his company to Fort Leaven worth, where he was equipp ed with equipment and a sword. (The sword was passed down the family) H e marched on in his company (Company C) with James B. Brown in command, 9 0 in each company. It was a company of noble men, according to his histor y and most all the Mormon men obeyed orders and went through all the sorr ows and hardships of that long march.

      After serving a year he was discharged at Los Angeles, July 16, 1847, an d arrived in the "Valley" in December, 1847. He became a resident of Grea t Salt Lake City during that winter and in the spring of 1848, went bac k east with the first mail to President Young at Winter Quarters.

      He worked on the Nauvoo Temple, until the walls were completed, on the St . George Temple for about 18 months, on the Salt Lake Temple 14 months, a nd on the Manti Temple four months, being a stone cutter by trade.

      He went to Parowan in 1851 with his father and family and acted as firs t counselor to his father (Bishop Tarlton Lewis) in Parowan where he wa s married Jan. 1854.

      He went to Arizona in 1880, and was one of the first settlers in Pima. H e helped to build John W. Young's factory at Moan Coppy, located at Thatc her, Arizona, about 1888 or 1889. In 1897 he moved to Colonia Juárez htt p://www.orsonprattbrown.com/MormonColonies/colonia-juarez7-11.html
      briefly. He died Aug 31, 1911 in Thatcher, AZ.
      posted by David B. @ 10:52 PM <http://ourfamilyheritage.blogspot.com/2011 /07/samuel-lewis.html

      Unfortunately the whole story is missing below
      source unknown

      AT THE INDIANS MERCY.
      Tucson, Arizona.
      August 31, 1896.
      In April, 1853 a party of emigrants
      passed through Parowan on their way
      to Southern Califonia and stole a very
      fine Pair of horses from a Brother Braffi?
      Knowing that their would have to camp
      for water at the Iron Springs, about
      thirty miles distant, a party of eleve n
      men organized to follow them and
      recover the animals, intending to come
      upon their camp the next morning about
      daylight. The bustle made in getting
      ready excited the curiosity of a couple
      of Utah Indians, members of a large
      force of several hundreds of warriors
      under the great chief Walker camped at
      Summit Creek seven miles distant.
      With customary caution they did not
      ask any grown person what was the
      cause of the stir, but inquired of a little
      boy, He told them the party were goin g
      out to fight Walker. The Utes hurried
      to Walker‘s camp. and told him of
      the intended attack and he at once pre-
      pared to received it.
      In ignorance of all this the little party
      of eleven men armed with rifles, accom-
      panied by Dr. P. Meeks and Samuel
      Gould, who were unarmed, started out
      about sunset, and oncoming in sight of
      the Indian camp dashed forward on the
      run, yelling in true boyish style. This
      convinced Walker that he was about to
      be attacked as he had been told, and hi s
      strategy was worthy his great reputation
      as King of the Mountains." He and
      Ammon, his brother, rode out to meet
      the advancing party and halted near a
      small ravine. He began to talk, and our
      little party clustered near to hear what
      was said. While this talk was going on
      Indians on horseback and on foot
      streamed forth on the right and Ieft in
      an unconcerned manner, as if to gather
      up their horses, but soon began to circle
      around us. Even then we did not sus-
      pect anything, but thought that they,
      too, simply wished to listen as we did
      But after a little while it was noticed
      that they were watching our party rather
      than Walker, and that they were draw n
      up in perfect order. Surrounding ou r
      party at a distance of about fifteen pace s
      was a circle of about thirty warriors o n
      horseback, each armed with a rifle, bo w
      and quiver of arrows.
      Beyond this circle was another com -
      posed of men on font armed with bow s
      and arrow; and beyond them was stil l
      another circle of footmen armed wit h
      rifles,while the little ravine was line d
      with dusky faces and rifle barrels. Wal -
      ker vehemently talked in Ute language ,
      which Ammon, who could speak Eng-
      lish fluently, interpreted from time t o
      time. Walker asked why we were ther e
      at that time of day with guns in ou r
      hands. Lieut. Col. J. A. Little, ou r
      leader, told him we were going afte r
      some stolen horses. Walker said it wa s
      a lie-—we had lost no horses-- we ha d
      come to fight. He was told he was
      mistaken; we did not want to fight, bu t
      had lost horses and wanted to get the m
      back frorn the Americanos who had
      stolen them. He said our place was t o
      stay at our wickiups and dig the groun d
      and work, and he became very much
      excited. Suddenly the lndians all lev -
      eled and cocked their guns, the bowmen
      stood with thelr murderous arrows read y
      to fly, and the outer circle kneeling up -
      on one knee, leveled their rifles upo n
      two sticks crossed to form a rest fo r
      their guns. We were helpless; not a
      man had his gun in position for use—w e
      were all huddled logelher in a compac t
      heap; and and had they fired not a sou l
      would have survived.
      It is a very disagreeable thing to loo k
      down the muzzle of a loaded ride wit h
      an angry Indian at the other end, ex -
      pecting, as we did, every moment t o
      feel the crash of a bullet, or, worse still ,
      to be pierced through with arrows .
      Though expecting death my only fea r
      was that of being wounded and the n
      tortured. But when Ammon said again
      that the Americanos had not taken th e
      horses, an inspiration came to Col. Lit -
      tle, and he answered. "Well. then, boys ,
      we had better go home again," at th e
      same time riding through the ranks, fol -
      lowed by all the party. The Indians
      seemed dazed for a time and did not
      pose the movement. Once outside the
      trap some wanted to fight, but Col. Lit-
      tle said, “No, we must let the people at
      home know what is going on, and
      away we went, followed by a party of
      mounted Indians in hot pursuit. The
      time we made was excellent—seldom
      beaten—and Parowan never seemed so
      beautiful as when we came near it and
      our pursuers turned back.
      A council was called, extra guards
      stationed, and all went to work making
      bullets and preparing for defense. In-
      dian spies reported our warlike prepar-
      ations to Walker, and he at once took to
      the mountains with his band. The
      council detemined to send an express
      to acquaint Governor B. Young with the
      affair, and Samuel Lewis, a son of
      Bishop Tarlton Lewis, volunteered for
      the service, and in less than an hour was
      away on his perilous ride.
      This ride ol Samuel Lewis is worthy
      of remembrance as a feat seIdum
      equaled by a while rider in this country.
      He went to Salt Lake City and returned
      ---a distance of over 520 miles—in eight
      days, going rnost of the way through a
      wild, mountainous country alone, at a
      time when no one traveled except in
      companies strong enough for defence.
      Leaving out the time he spent in the
      ciiy he averaged about seventy miles a
      day for eight days. Persons who have
      not ridden seventy miles day after day
      cannot know what it means; after the
      ?rst day or two every bone and muscl e
      in the body aches lntolerably, and one
      can find no position to obtain any care.
      President Young hurried Brother
      Lewis back with orders to avoid all
      trouble or conflict, as Parowan was to
      distant to receive any help.
      By the time Brother Lewis returned to
      Parowan all was peace again. Mutual
      explanations had been made, Walker
      saying that the emigrants had told him
      the Mormons would come and fight him,
      and when he saw the boys coming on
      the run—whooping and yelling—he
      thought it was true. We learned the
      emigrants had said this to prevent a

      OCCUPATION: In charge of the horses for the Wagon Train going to (Zion) to Salt Lake Utah. First wagon train to Utah.

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] Web: Arizona, Find A Grave Index, 1861-2011.

    2. [S25] 1860 United States Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Beaver, Beaver, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1314; Page: 747; Image: 210; Family History Library Film: 805314.

    3. [S26] 1870 United States Federal Census, Year: 1870; Census Place: District 7 Minersville, Beaver, Utah Territory; Roll: M593_1610; Page: 30B; Image: 65; Family History Library Film: 553109.

    4. [S29] Membership of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1830-1848.

    5. [S30] Members of the Mormon Battalion.

    6. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census, Ancestry Family Tree.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=33810113&pid=125

    7. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census, Year: 1880; Census Place: Panguitch, Iron, Utah; Roll: 1336; Family History Film: 1255336; Page: 341B; Enumeration District: 020.

    8. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census.

    9. [S31] 1850 United States Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M432_919; Page: 64B; Image: 132.

    10. [S32] Conquerors of the West: Stalwart Mormon Pioneers, Vols. 1-2.