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Genealogy of the Moody and Crandall, Hood and Linder families
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Elizabeth MOODY

Elizabeth MOODY[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

Female 1896 - 1987  (90 years)

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  • Name Elizabeth MOODY 
    Born 5 Dec 1896  Thatcher, Graham, Arizona Territory, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8
    Gender Female 
    Initiatory (LDS) 27 Jan 1928  ARIZO Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1930  Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1935  Rural, Las Vegas, Nevada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1940  Supervisorial District 1, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FSFTID KWCG-53H 
    _UID 3AA9DEB7B37365489BBE2C6738D30BD6231F 
    Died 6 Mar 1987  Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 4
    Buried 11 Mar 1987  Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 4
    Person ID I7  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father Francis Winfred MOODY,   b. 26 Aug 1858, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Aug 1919, Thatcher, Graham, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Malinda Gimlin LEWIS,   b. 10 Sep 1866, Minersville, Beaver, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1903, Central, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Married 7 Nov 1882  St. George, Wshngtn, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _UID F888F9E4631B6548800E249FFEE075DC08A4 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married St. George Temple, St George, Washington , UTAH.
    Family ID F9  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Myron Hamilton CRANDALL,   b. 28 Nov 1897, Safford, Graham County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1962, Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 11 Apr 1917  Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID C5ECB13C87EF5844A06A0FC6109BED5279A6 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Thatcher, Graham, Arizona, United States.
    Children 
     1. Myron Chester CRANDALL,   b. 29 May 1918, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1918, Bisbee, Cochise, Az Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     2. Elton Francis CRANDALL, Sr.,   b. 16 Mar 1920, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1995, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     3. Gerald H. CRANDALL,   b. 3 Oct 1924, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Feb 2016, Tucson, Pima, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)
     4. Joseph Rulon CRANDALL
     5. Lawrence Moody CRANDALL,   b. 29 Jul 1928, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Apr 2006, Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     6. Norman Lewis CRANDALL,   b. 11 Oct 1931, Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Apr 2015, Apache Junction, Pinal, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F5  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Milo Thompson GALE,   b. 10 Apr 1891, Colonia Diaz, Chihuahua, , Mexico Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 1978, Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Married 26 Sep 1964  Mesa, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 9AE4A73E761327498D7D6EFB676B592A24BB 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Mesa, Maricopa, AZ.
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F8  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Elizabeth Moody
    Elizabeth Moody


  • Notes 
    • Loved to sing and dance and write poems

      Childhood Journal of Elizabeth Moody Crandall

      I was born Dec 5th 1896 in Thatcher, Arizona
      My Father was Francis Winfred Moody and
      my Mother was Malinda Gimlin Lewis.

      I had five brothers and five sisters
      Francis Winfred Moody (md. Charlotte Smith)
      Samuel Lewis Moody (md. Ida Bingham)
      Edward Moody (md Hazel Patterson)
      Ida Katurah Moody (Merrill) (Ernstsen)
      Glenna Moody (md. Frank Martineau)
      June Moody (md. Don Curtis)
      Rulon Moody (md. Emily and Aytha)
      Malinda Moody (md. Howard McBride, md. Crips Wilson)

      And there were two children born between Ida and Glenna, John and Eunice , who died in infancy, and myself made eleven children.

      Our mother died when I was only six years old. We had a mite of a strugg le after she died. Winnie was married when mother died. Sam married 2 yea rs after. So did Ida. Ida was only fifteen when mother died. That lef t her to be the house keeper and do the sewing, washing, ironing, cooking , and caring for the little two-week-old baby and us. June was eight year s old and Glenna was ten.
      Grandmother Moody took Rulon and I for a while, then the whole family mov ed in with her for a while, but it proved too much for Grandmother so the y all moved back home. Of course Ida had married before we went to Grandm asâ€. After that June and Glenna had to take over. They did pretty good t oo. But it was hard. It always fell my lot to wash the dishes and dust th e furniture, June loved to cook and Glenna loved to sew. I liked to coo k but they thought I was too little. I was only one and a half years youn ger that June.
      I can’t remember much about mother, but I can remember when she died . I was out in the backyard playing with a little girl named Julia Farley ; Her mother was taking care of our mother. I remember Julia screamed lou dly and I said. œOh, Julia, you mustnt scream like that. My mother is awf ul sick.
      Just then June came running out where we were and said to come quick, mam ma was dying. I’ll never forget that scene. Mother was on the bed, tryi ng to talk but couldnt. Papa holding Rulon, who was three, Winnie was cry ing and rubbing her feet. We were all around the bed crying. I cry now th inking how terrible it was, losing our dear mother. No one knows wha t a terrible tragedy it was. Not only for we children, but Papa, poor dar ling, how he must have suffered. He never remarried. Just took care of us . Everyone said he was one Father in a million. So good, kind, and patien t with us children. After mother died, I remember him taking all four o f we children, Glenna, June, Rulon, and myself, down to the lower field . We were playing in the sand in an irrigation ditch, while he worked i n the field. Glenna got behind some willows and screamed like a wildcat . (Papa had killed one a day or two before) it frightened us so we cried . He had to take us all back to the house before he could resume his work . This all happened when we lived in Central, I’m getting ahead of my s tory.
      I can’t remember too much of my mother, but there are a few things tha t I can remember. I remember when we all had smallpox. I had less than an yone so mama let me wait on some of the others. After we had all had them , Papa came down. He was lft covered with them. I remember Mama going ove r each smallpox with a swab with cream on it.
      And Winnie had typhoid fever Oh! He had it bad. I remember mother feedin g him steak, but watching every bit. She would let him chew it then spi t it out. He would cry, ”Just let me swallow one bite”
      I remember we had home made carpets on the floor. It was so nice when Pa pa and Mama would put fresh clean straw, under a new clean carpet. It al ways smelled so fresh and clean.
      In the evening we would gather around the fireplace and sing songs and Ma ma would play the organ. Papa would hold me or Rulon on his lap or we wou ld lie down by the fire.

      I was three when Rulon was born. Grandma Moody took care of mother. He w as born the 7th of November and it was cold, so Grandma put Rulon down t o the foot of the bed where she had a hot iron to keep him warm, also mam a’s feet. He screamed ad when they took him up his big toe was badly bu rned. It never grew back straight but stuck straight up.
      Mama had had four girls besides Little Eunice who died in infancy. And l ittle Johnny who died when 2 and a half years old. Oh how Papa loved litt le Johnny. He said the little fellow would cry to go with him. Said he wa s the only one in the famiy with blue eyes and sandy red hair. I can’ t remember hearing Papa say what caused Johnnie’s death or Eunice’s . So Rulon coming after all those girls, so naturally we lavished our lov e on that little boy.
      Papa took him with him everywhere that he could. One time one of the hir ed hands gave me a sack of candy, Rulon was not there at the time, so I p ut it in a drawer and wouldn’t eat a bite until Rulon got there. We did nt get candy very often
      One day our cousin Arthur took Rulon and I with him, to bring a plow fro m the lower field. We were in a wagon with a high spring seat and as he p ut on the brakes to go down into a ditch, Rulon and I slipped out. He wa s able to catch Rulon, but I went out and under the wagon wheels and wa s hurt real bad. I lay unconscious for three days, with broken ribs. The y had the Elders administer to me and I recovered. June fell out of the w agon one time and the wheels cut off one of her braids.
      There was a lot of tragedy in those days. Yet we had a lot of happines s too. When Papa and Mama married, they planted this Mulberry tree in ou r front yard and it grew to be a big tree. Papa made a large swing wit h a swing board that was wide enugh for two. He also put a plank in the t runk of the tree where two could sit in it. We had more fun in and aroun d that tree than a pack of monkeys.
      Aunt Lula Layton lived just across the street from us. She had twelve chi ldren. Her oldest girl was the same age as Glenna. Blanche was her name . Then Clyde was June’s age. Flossie was my age and Bertha (Bertie we c alled her) was Rulon’s age. Then there was Beatrice and Jessie, Marlo n and Junius, Then Max and Chester.
      Aunt Lulu had one little boy Delbert who died before I could remember. B ut I do remember when Rex died. He was a beautiful baby with big blue eye s and sandy red or more of a golden hair. She always had such pretty babi es. Flossie was always the one to tend them. She always had one on her hi p or in a baby buggy, She would have the baby’s face in the sun, so on e day I said to her, “Why don’t you put an umbrella over his face s o the sun won’t get in his eyes?” She answered,“ Because he has t o shut his eyes, and he will soon go to sleep.” Which I found out he di d. Then we could play. But I thought it was fun to push the baby in a car riage.
      We had other neighbors, Grandma Hendricks. (We just called her that) an d her daughter whom we called Aunt Susie and her husband Uncle Tom Merri ll. They had a little girl my age named Zilpha. We loved each other and h ad a lot of fun together. We all played under the mulberry tree. We mad e horses and cows from the gourds, which grew along the ditch bank. We ma de mud pies and Adobe Houses and rag dolls. We pulled our dolls along i n a shoebox with a string tied on it to pull by. We made our own amusemen t.

      In the spring when the apple trees were in bloom we made wreaths to put o n our heads and long trains made from cottonwood leaves pinned together w ith sticks, I was the queen and the others were my princes and princesses .
      Or we would play in the barn and swing on the derrick rope from the baile d hay to the loose hay, which was soft and smelled so nice.
      On Sunday after noon we would have Sunday School and I would always lea d in the singing. We learned all the songs by heart this way. Like:

      Catch the sunshine though it flickers
      Through a dark and dusty cloud.
      Though it falls so dark and feeble
      In a heart with sorrow bowed
      Catch it quickly it is passing,
      Passing rapidly away,
      It has only come to tell you
      There is but a brighter day.
      We used to sing:
      Oh I had such a pretty dream mama
      Such pleasant and beautiful thing
      Of a dear little nest in the meadows of rest’
      Where the birdie her lullaby sings
      Of a dear little nest in the meadows of rest
      Where the birdie her lullaby sings

      I saw there a stream full of lilies,
      Pressed over the green mossy stones
      And just where I lay a thin sparkling spray
      Sang sweetly in delicate tones
      And just where I lay a thin sparkling spray
      Sang sweetly in delicate tones

      And as it rolled on toward the ocean
      Through meadows and pretty sunbeams
      Each note grew more deep and I soon fell asleep
      And was off to the Island of dreams
      Each note grew more deep and I soon fell asleep
      And was off to the Island of dreams
      I saw there a beautiful Angel
      Al clothed and bespangled with dew
      She touched me and spoke and I quickly awoke
      And I found that Dear Mama Twas you
      She touched me and spoke and I quickly awoke
      And I found that Dear Mama Twas you

      Papa used to have Rulon and I sing that song
      together and another called
      Hello Central Give Me Heaven.
      Papa, Im so sad and lonely,
      Sobbed a tearful little child
      Since mamas gone to heaven
      Papa darling youve not smiled
      I will speak to her to come home
      Just you listen and Ill call her
      Through the telephone
      Hello Central, give me heaven
      For my mamas there
      You can find her with the angels
      On the golden stair
      She’ll be glad its me whos speaking
      Call her wont you please
      For I want to surely tell her
      We’re so lonely here

      When the girl received this message
      Coming oer the telephone
      How the heart thrilled me that moment
      And the wire seemed to moan
      I will answer just to please her
      Yes. dear heart Ill soon come home
      Kiss me mama, kiss your darling
      O’er the telephone.

      These were such sad songs for two little motherless kids to sing, but w e never refused to sing when asked. He even woke us from our sleep to sin g to Hazel, Edd’s girlfriend, and now his wife.
      We were always busy playing with so many playmates. We would all gathe r in a circle and sing Ring Around the Roses and if it would start to rai n, “Ring Around the Rafter, Pour down faster”. If it did start to pou r, we would quickly scattr to our homes.
      We liked to swing on the big gate that went into Uncle Oscar's stockyard . He didn’t like for us to do this because it made the gate sag. One da y he got after Flossie for doing this and I called him a fool. Of cours e he told my mother and she really gave me good talking to. I never remem ber her of Papa either ever spanking us. The older children said Papa whi pped them hard. I remember one of them telling Papa, “You would have wh ipped us for that” Papa answered, I have learned better, Not that we d idn’t need it sometimes. But we were pretty good children most of the t ime.
      Speaking of neighbors, Grandma Hendrick's had many daughters, so it seems , there was one Mandy Price. She had a little girl my age, Artie, one Gle nna and June’s ages and a little boy who was drug to death by a horse . He had the rope wrapped around his around his hand and couldn’t loose n it. I remember their father killed a hog one day and he took a cup an d drank the blood. They even made blood pudding. I told my mother about t his and she said he was English and it was a custom there at that time, I t seemed repulsive to me.
      There was Aunt Nancy Smith I remember one little girl named Bell and Id a’s age named Pearl. I came to know Pearl and liked her in later years . They all moved away, seems like, before or after mama died, I can’t r emember.
      But I do remember we liked them very much and I remember them gathered i n the on the lawn sewing carpet rags and Zilpha and Bell and Artie and Fl ossie playing together while the older one’s talked and laughed and sew ed. We went into the grape vineyard and gathered bunches of luscious grap es.
      I remember Grandma Lewis moved in with us, I can’t remember for how lon g. She had Jane, Josie, and Arthur with her. They were her grandchildren . Aunt Elvira’s Children. That’s another story. They didn’t live t here long, because the little house they lived in, we called the grainer y was moved up close to our house making an extra bedroom upstairs an d a dining room downstairs. I remember on my fifth birthday Aunt Lorrie a nd her Daughter Annie came to see us and I said, “Today’s my birthday , but we only have bread and gravy.” That was in the winter and we ha d plenty of canned fruit, or dried.
      I know we had a large orchard, all kinds of apples, peaches, pears, apric ots, and plums. The Satsuma plums, Papa called them the strawberry plum.
      I loved to crawl in the irrigation ditch, and gather blackberries in th e spring of the year. Great big luscious berries under the vines where i t was damp and cool, it made them larger and sweeter.
      Papa always had a garden. Rulon and I liked to follow along behind th e plow and gather little potatoes, they grew on the roots of some kind o f a bush or weed. I don’t know what it was called (Murphy Potato). Mam a made a hoarhound candy fromne weed. Hoarhound. She made a cough syrup t o cure our cough. I remember when she pulled a large pan of custard fro m the oven. She gave me a taste, Oh, it was good.
      We had pickles by the barrel and Papa always bought sugar by the hundre d pound sack. I remember one time a skunk got in the kitchen and sprayed . Papa had to bury a sack of sugar and one of potatoes. We had to eat ou t side for a while.
      We had a well with an oaken bucket on the end of a rope. The rope went th rough a pulley then there was another bucket on the end of the rope.
      I remember when my Uncle Henry died. They had bottles of ice all aroun d him. It must have been summer. They did this to keep him. There were n o undertakers then. Grandma Moody was doctor, undertaker, and midwife. No t only that, she ran a boardng house, but that was before my time.
      I remember Mama stopping at Grandma Moody’s, and Grandma gave us a piec e of mincemeat pie, it was so good. She served it on her real china plate s. I loved those pretty plates with pretty blue flowers on them. After Ma ma died, Rulon and I lived with Grandma. She would let us eat out of on e of those dishes if we were good.

      I remember Mama taking Rulon and I to Pima to buy her a new hat at siste r Gustavison’s hat shop. We stopped to see Aunt Mary Judd who lived i n Pima. Aunt Mary was real fat. I believe she was heavier than Grandma Le wis. But Grandma Lewis was shorter. I take after her. Darn it. My mothe r was real slender. I don’t think she ever weighed more than 117 lbs.
      She was very active. Did so many things in her short life. She took a nur sing class when Rulon was a baby. Ida took care of the baby and cooked fo r the family, then carried the baby a mile to where mother was for him t o nurse. I guess Rulon and Linda had the easiest life of any of the famil y. Still after the girls married, I had a hard time but at the time I did n’t think it was so bad.

      Besides farming, Papa used to freight. That is he hauled produce from th e valley to Globe. I guess that was before my time too.

      There is part of a little poem Mama taught me and it went like this;
      You needn’t be trying to comfort me
      I tell you my dolly is dead.
      How do you think she could live?
      With a crack like that in her head.

      Then there was a little song she used to sing to her babies;
      Early in the morning, take your baby out,
      Let him smell the cool fresh air,
      Feed him o bananas he’ll never get the gout,
      Tie a yellow ribbon in his hair

      I remember her bed was so pretty, with a white bedspread and pillow shams , starched stiff and embroidered by Mama. Then there were velvet cushion s that she had painted flowers on. We never thought of getting near her b ed. So far that is all I can remember of the things that happened befor e we moved to Central. Papa bought a farm and dairy from Alfred Cluff, b ut he kept our place in Thatcher. Sam and Ida ran that farm and lived i n the house.

      Now, I can’t remember moving but I do remember our first Christmas in C entral. This was considered a very nice brick house. A large parlor wit h nice furnishings. A beautiful blond or walnut or was it maple organ. Id a took a few lessons and one song I remember she and some of the young fo lk s singing;
      Think I’ll marry Bill
      He wrote me a letter, Let me tell you what was in it,
      said if I didn’t marry him he wouldn’t live a minute.
      He said if I didn’t marry him he wouldn’t live a minute
      He said if I didn’t marry him he wouldn’t live a minute
      I read the Blessed Bible It say’s you mustn’t kill,
      thought the matter over Think I’ll marry Bill
      Think I’ll marry Bill
      Think I’ll marry Bill
      Thought the matter over Think I’ll marry Bill

      We sang many beautiful songs especially at night around the fireplace. Po pping corn and making candy.
      One day I was playing with Stella Cluff, my cousin. Aunt Lizzie and Uncl e Jode owned the creamery. Mr. Norton was working there. He lived in on e of our houses on our place. Well we were just looking around and I spie d that large churn. They had it all clean and nice so I said to Stella,†œ You get in it and I will turn you around and then you can turn me” S o we turned each other until we were got tired then Mr. Norton came and a sked me if Mama sent for any thing. I Said, Yes mama wants some butter. W e took our cream there, so I thought she might want some. He gave it to m e and I started home. I was almost home when I saw Mr. Norton coming behi nd me. (He was going home to dinner but I thought he was coming after m e because I knew mamma hadn’t wanted butter. I had punched a hole in i t and was eating it.) Well I threw the butter over the fence and went int o my little friend Letha Whitmers.
      When he had gone I went on home. When I opened the door they were eatin g dinner and what was the first thing I saw on the table? You guessed it ! It was that pound of butter with the hole in the corner. I threw up m y little hands and exclaimed! Where did that come from? Every one laughe d but I was ashamed and mama gave me a good talking to about telling a li e.
      I went to kindergarten, one thing I remember, my teacher was Hattie Bilby . She let me pour water on my desk, then we splashed the water with our l ittle hands and sang this song:

      Pitter, patter comes the rain drop
      Truant raindrops from on high
      When the sun comes he will catch them
      And will bring them by a rainbow
      Back again within the sky.

      At Sunday School class the teacher asked if any one knew a song. Rulon he ld up his hand and got up and sang.
      She was gathering watercresses
      My little watercress gir-er-erl.
      She was gathering watercresses
      My little watercress gir-er-erl.

      He sang it over and over until I had to get him and bring him to his seat . He was only three. It was really cute. I thought he was the cutest litt le boy I ever saw. Of course I was prejudiced. There was another house cl ose to the one we lived in. It was built for the hired help. Sam and Ed d slept over there. Evidently Rulon slept with them sometimes. As I reme mber them telling him they would give a nickel to the first one to fal l a sleep. Rulon shut his eyes tight and said “I’m asleep,” We al l loved that little boy.

      When June had her eighth birthday party, Papa gave me a nickel to buy he r a present I bought a package of gum. Stella Cluff and her brother Vervi e and Rulon and I were going to the party. Well, we ended up chewing al l the gum, and as we passedhe canal, there were hundreds of little hopp y toads so I filled the sack that the gum was in and presented it to June . When she opened the bag all those little toads hopped out and she scre amed and Mama came out and they told her what I had done. She said, “Th at was a bright idea. They won’t hurt you dear.” She hugged June an d kissed away her tears. Then Ida brought out cake and punch and all wa s forgotten. Oh yes, home-made ice cream. June made her own cake. She alw ays liked to cook. I was always having bright ideas. I guess she got othe r presents, I can’t remember.

      Mama took care of the sick a lot, and I remember when Lillie Moody, Aun t Maybell, and Uncle Bill’s fourth child was born, mama was helping o r taking care of her. Uncle Bill gave Blanch a nickel, and sent her and h er brother Alphonso, my broter Rulon and I to the store, just a block awa y.
      It was in February 1902. The leaves were all over the ground we were wal king and laughing and kicking the leaves along the way when Blanch lost h er nickel, Now that was a real tragedy. The little boys began to cry an d we looked and looked and culdn’t find it. I was the oldest of the bun ch. I was six years old. So I said don’t cry, lets all kneel down and a sk our heavenly father to help us find it. So I gave a little prayer an d as I put my hand on the ground to get up off my knees. There was the ni ckel! Right under my hand! No one was as surprised as I was. We all squea led with delight. We went up to the store which was called, believe it o r not, “Nichols” store. We got five candy brooms. I can still taste t hem now they were a marshmallow shaped like a broom covered with chocolat e. Now they would cost a dime each. We took the extra one home to Joe. Th e oldest boy. He was about eight or nine. We must have been gone a long t ime for when we got back there was a little new baby in Aunt Maybelle’ s arms. Aunt Maybelle was a sweet little person. Her voice was so soft . I always loved to go there.

      I remember getting into a fight with Blanch because she said her mama wa s better than mine. Uncle Bill separated us. He said they were both bette r. Yours is best for you, Blanch and yours is best for you, Grandma. He a lways called me that. I guss because I had her name. Blanch always said h er mother was a homely woman, said she never went anywhere. I don’t i f she ever went away from the place. She even had Blanch buy all the bab y clothes (I mean the cloth). She made all their clothes. She was a goo d cook and housekeeper.
      Mamma took good care of so many people. I remember her caring for a litt le boy named Joe Friendly who had typhoid. I don’t know why she took m e with her. They lived down the field and across the railroad tracks. The re was a lane going down thre. We liked to watch the train go by. Sometim es we would put pins crossways and it looked like scissors. We liked to w ave at the conductor. He would wave back.
      Mama worked so hard. She wanted us to have the nicest things. I wish sh e hadn’t worked so hard. Maybe she would have lived to take care of us.
      The Christmas before she died was indeed the best Christmas we ever had . She made new clothes for all of us, besides being pregnant and taking c are of sick people.

      I can remember how our dresses were made. Mine was pink cashmere, with s ilk braid on it. I think Glenna’s and June’s were the same but I can⠀™t remember. There was a beautiful Christmas tree in the parlor. The doo r was locked we couldnâ€t get in until everything was ready. There was al so a tree at the church, everybody got bags of candy and nuts, There wa s a program. They played games. I remember one which was called, “Her e we go loopedy Loo, Here we go Loopedy Lee, Here we go Loopedy Loo, al l on a Christmas Night.” They lined all the children in two rows faci ng each other about three feet apart, Then someone came along and scatter ed candy. We could have all you could scramble for. It was fun. Nowadays , they wouldn’t think of letting children eat candy off the floor. The y might have had paper on the floor. I can’t remember.

      Christmas evening Papa and mama opened the door of the parlor and let u s in. There was the beautiful tree all up with candles in little tin hold ers. Of course I got a doll and June got dishes. Rulon got a little red w agon and a small iron wagn pulled by a team of grey horses. A long time a fter he left them out in the rain. I told him they were dead so we burie d them like they buried mama, that was long after mama died.
      Well, Mama had a wonderful dinner, with plum
      pudding, turkey and dressing gravy and mashed potatoes, just everything.
      We had almond trees I remember no one could climb up to the top of thos e trees but me. I was just like a little cat. that reminds me of when mam a was taking care of Inez Lee. Of course she took Rulon and I along. I th ink it was when Jessie was born, when or the time of the year I can’t r emember, but they had some little kittens and when we had gone Mrs. Lee s aid “Mama, don’t this little kitten look just like little Lizzie Mood y?” Grandma Lewis lived up close to Lee’s. I liked to go see her. I a lways loved old people. I still love them even though I’m old now.

      Our house had a porch on it with banisters or railing whatever it was... . ran from post to post. I used to walk along them balancing myself a s I walked across it. It was a beautiful home, a front yard with grass an d flowers and trees. Mama wasroud of it. She did everything to beautify t he house and keep us looking nice. Even we children. She did more in he r thirty seven years than most do in twice that time.
      I can’t remember anymore before mama died. That was so terrible! No on e knows what it is to lose your mother unless you go through it.

      After she was dead, Aunt Susie Claridge took me home with her and someh ow we were late to the funeral. I got to crying so hard Aunt Susie too k me outside and talked to me, and I was able to go back inside, The win d blew hard going to the cemeery, then watching them put her down in tha t deep hole and shoveling dirt her haunted me for years. I never liked t o be alone after that.

      In the summer time we would take a quilt and go out on the lawn to sleep . We had no coolers or electricity then. When it was a new moon I would l ook up in the sky and think they had put mama’s coffin almost over th e hole in the sky and ony a little light shown through. I thought the sta rs were holes in the sky and when it rained the water came through the ho les, but when it wasn’t raining the light shone through the star hole s and the big moon hole.
      I wasn’t sad all the time. I had many fun times after Rulon and I wen t to live with Grandma Moody. When it was a real hot day Grandma would d raw some water from the well and put it in a No, 2 wash tub. Then she wou ld let us get in with our od clothes on (as we never heard of a swimmin g suit). We would splash around and then get out and run around and jum p back in again. My what fun.

      I can’t remember when Papa moved back to Thatcher. I do remember his s elling the Central place to Orson Echols. He had two boys and two girls . One boy’s name was Brian. When Orson was plowing his wife got on hi s lap and put her arms aroundis neck and rode with him. I thought that wa s so s trange. Papa took one of us kids with him, but not Mama. I gues s she never had time, what with nine children, and nursing the sick and a ll. I don’t how she did it. Ida helped a lot.
      We had nice neighbors in Central. The house across the street must have b een a rental because Jenkins lived there, Wallace Lorenzo and the twins M ary and Martha. Then there were the Tryons. I’ll never forget there wa s Mandy with a new dress. Her father was killing a hog. I was watching wi th some of the smaller children. Mandy comes out there with a new dress t o show her daddy. “Look Daddy, at my new dress”. He said, “Isn’ t that beautiful,? Reach me that stick so I can touch you”. He had bloo d all over his hands. But he took time out to compliment her on her new d ress. I thought that was so sweet. Then there was Nancy and deaf Davy Clu ff. They had two boys, Willy and Leo. A cow hooked Leo in the side and t hrew him up in the air, it made a big hole in his side.

      I had the typhoid fever after Mama died and I almost died, too. I was ou t of my head (now they say delirious). Glenna said they left her in the r oom to look after me while they ate supper. I kept saying, “I’m comin g, Mama, take me with you.€ Then I would talk to a little playmate who h ad just died named Gaytha Webster. She and her mother were the ones Mam a took care of when she took sick and died after childbirth.
      Grandma was in Utah at the time and she said had she been home to take c are of Mama, she wouldn’t have died. But she put my name in the Templ e to be prayed for and I got well. Edd had the typhoid too, he said, bu t I can’t remember that. Thre was a lot of typhoid in those days. Ope n wells and things like that.
      You know Ida must have had a hard time of it as she was only fifteen wh en mama died. I remember when Ida was going to make her wedding dress. Sh e was going up there in the buggy with Lottie. Seems as though Lottie wa s going to help her maker dress. They rode clear up to Thatcher and got o ut at Lottie’s when Ida said, ”Oh! I lost my thimble.” I said “He re it is”. They didn’t even know I was there, I hid under the seat. W ere they surprised! Lottie had to fix me a bed on the floor.
      Ida was our second mother and when she married and went to Bisbee, we al l saw her off at the train and some people thought it was a funeral, we a ll cried so. She was seventeen then. Seems as though I was back and four th, Rulon and I were alwas together. Grandmother was a good mother to u s .

      We had religion class after school and on the first of the month was fas t day. Each child got up and bore their testimony. Each one said, “I’ m thankful for my mother and father, I know the gospel is true”. So whe n I said mine I said “Im thankful for my father and I am thankful I hav e a good grandma to take care of me.”
      Sister Coleman was my teacher and she got up in conference and told abou t little Lizzie Moody saying she was thankful she had a good grandma to t ake care of her. Grandma had tears in her eyes and I said, “Grandma, wh y are you crying?” she sid, “Because it makes me happy to know you l ove me.”
      “Oh! I do grandma, I love you better than anybody else in the world, ex cept Papa.” She took Rulon and I to church and sometimes to Relief Soci ety of which she was president.
      I didn’t start school until I was eight years old. I guess it was beca use I had been sick with the typhoid fever, or maybe because Grandma need ed me to look after Rulon. We went to kindergarten in Central also in Tha tcher, Rene McGuire wasy teacher in Thatcher. I remember one game we play ed. She had a little box of soft colored balls made of plush or yarn. An y way we thought they were pretty. We formed a circle, she let me take th e box and sing out, “Greengages ripe, Greengages ripe, who will buy m y greengages ripe for the green ball,” The yellow was oranges, and cher ries for the red and so on.

      At Christmas time we learned this song-
      Merry, merry, merry, merry
      Christmas bells so sweetly chime
      Of the happy voices of the breezes swell
      This merry, merry Christmas Time.
      Peace on earth good will to men
      Let angel sing and sing again
      Let Hearts and voices here below
      Join in the sweet refrain
      Oh Merry, merry, merry, merry
      Christmas bells so sweetly chime
      Of the happy voices of the breezes swell
      this merry, merry Christmas Time.
      Banish every thought of care
      Let mirth and music fill the air
      Its hearts and voices here below
      Join me in the sweet refrain

      When I did start to the first grade Miss Rhodes was my teacher. I love d her for she was so sweet. I only stayed there until Xmas and she promot ed me to the second grade. Mrs. Coleman (Minnie) was her name. I loved he r. I always kissed her whenchool was out.
      One day I was running to get in line after the bell had rung, just as I r an around the corner, Frank Moody was coming around the other way and w e bumped into each other. It knocked me out cold. Someone carried me int o the room and put me on a bench. Then Jimmie Duke (who was also a teache r) took me to Aunt Suzies and put me on her bed. When I came to Glenna w as standing by me and she took me home. Evidently that was when we wer e all living at Grandmother’s.
      One day I was at the head of the class in spelling and I had been sick t he day before and when it came my turn to spell doughnut, I spelled it do nut. Everyone laughed, but I cried. So my teacher said,” that’s all r ight , we won’t send Lizie to the foot of the class today because she w asn’t here when we had the word. I loved her for that. She gave partie s for us at her home and at school.
      This particular party we each had to bring a pie. I didn’t get to serv e, Alice Kimball and Anna Pace were serving. I had brought a beautiful cu r rent pie, made by sister in law Ida, but I was served a piece of prun e or dried plum it tasted lie. Oh it was terrible! I just put it in the w as tebasket, where there were several other pieces there
      When I was in the third grade U.I. Paxton was our teacher. He was reall y a nice man, he really taught us spelling. We had to spell the word the n put the markings. Like āil ll.

      We learned a song where six of us girls sang a round. No that was in th e second grade. We had a music teacher whose name was E.M.W. Jones, he wa s from New York. He taught us this song.
      The hunter winds his bugle horn
      To horse, to horse, hello, hello
      The fiery courser sniffs the morn
      And thronging helps the Lords pursue
      Up springs from yonder fiery thorn
      A deer more white than yonder thorn
      And louder rings the hunters horn
      Hark forward, forward Hello, Hello

      We had much enjoyment at school. But in the third grade, Mr. Paxton wa s s inging a song; it went like this only when he sang he screwed his mo uth up in a little ball. I watched him and I was screwing my mouth up th e same way. I wasn’t even noticing myself the song went like this.

      Tick, tock, tick, tock
      Can’t you hear the old clock.
      Tick, tock, tick, tock, ticking all the day!
      Tick, tock, tick, tock
      Don’t you hear the old clock.
      Telling how the happy hours speed away
      Hear the ding dong bell,
      Hear the ding dong bell
      Every year the same old story it must tell

      Then chorus,
      He saw me screwing my mouth just like his and he just kept on singing whi le he was walking down to me. He reached over and took my arm and shook m e. Oh was I ever embarrassed? That was the only time I was ever chastise d in school. I didn’t even know I was mocking him. It was so funny.
      At the end of the school year, he took us all on a picnic. He and his br other owned the bottle works. So he brought several cases of soda pop. I t sure tasted good. You couldn’t buy it very often. We so seldom had ha d the nickel. People in thse days had plenty to eat but little money. Th ere were no radios or TVs so we had to make our own amusement, You couldn ’t go to the store and buy a loaf of bread or a cake. You had to make y our own.
      While I was still in the third grade, I went home with Bertha Bingham. Em ma Smith went also. It was on my way home. They had a large swing on a co ttonwood tree. Bertha said, “First one to the swing, gets to swing firs t. ” Of course I beat. I could out run any boy my age or out climb. We ll, I started to swing and Edna said, ”Don’t let her swing, She’s n othing but an old hobo without any ma.” Well, she won. I jumped out o f the swing and ran home as fast as I could go, crying all the way.
      The next day Edna came up to me and put her arms around me and ask me t o forgive her. Her father was the depot agent, there were tramps coming t o the house asking for food. She ask who they were so her mother told he r they were people withot a mother or home so they called them Hobo’s . I had no mother, so she thought I was a hobo. After that we were real g ood friends.
      Ida’s mother-in-law, Aunt Emma Merrill lived right next door to the s chool house, so once in a while I would drop in to see her. This time sh e looked at my writing and said, ”Well that’s pretty good, I can rea d it.” Then she went intohe kitchen and brought me the biggest most del icious piece of lemon pie I have ever seen or tasted before or since.
      Mr. Paxton was really nice to we girls but he had some difficult boys t o handle and he really mopped the floor with them. Bumped their heads o n the floor. In those days kids didn’t get away with anything. There we re three of my little friens that didn’t pass that year. I felt sorry f or them.
      Now I am in the fourth grade. This was the nicest and most enjoyable gra de of all. Mrs. Maude Calison was my teacher. She read books to us abou t the Arabian Knights so many wonderful things. We girls drew paper doll s and cut them out and our techer thought they were so good she hung the m on the wall. Every week she put the names of those who never missed a w ord in spelling. Mine was there every week. I was so proud. Grandma helpe d me every night.
      She gave us a poem to learn and the one that did it best got a prize . I won. Oh! I was so happy. My prize was a book of poems. This is the p o em we read:

      The Arab and His Steed
      My beautiful, My beautiful! That standeth meekly by
      With proudly arch and glossy neck And dark and fiery eye.
      Fret not to roam the desert now, With all the winged speed
      I’m not to mount on thee again Thou art sold my desert steed
      Slow and weary I shall roam with weary feet alone
      Where with fleet step and joyous bound Thou oft hath borne me on
      And sitting down at this green well I’ll pause and sadly think
      T’was here he bowed his glossy neck when last I saw him drink.

      When last I saw him drink? Away the fevered dream is o’er
      I could not live a day and know that we should meet no more
      They tempted me my beautiful, for hungers power is strong
      They tempted me my beautiful but I have loved too long
      Who said that I had given thee up, whom said that thou were sold
      ‘Tis false, ‘tis false! My Arab steed Fling them back their gold
      Thus I leap upon thy back to scour the distant plains
      Away who overtakes us now can claim thee for his pains
      By Carlin E Norton.

      Mrs. Calison gave a Christmas play with everyone in her class taking part . I sang a solo.
      Judea’s King
      T’was in Judeas country fair,
      Within the manger lowly.
      The King was born in early morn,
      The worlds redeemer holy.
      There came a star within the sky
      So runs the same old story
      And angels voices sang on high.
      The stars and all their glory.

      And so in honor of the king
      We raise on high our branches
      And glad Hosannas sweetly ring
      and all the world rejoices

      A dream of Santa Clause.
      The beginning of the play. The curtain rises and a mother (Aunt Emma C l uff) is singing to her little boy (Wendle).
      Go to sleep my baby dear, Stars on high are shining bright
      They o’er you a watch will keep through the coming night.
      Then we all sing and come out from behind the wings singing and swaying a nd swinging our arms.
      Lullaby, lullaby bye
      Lullaby, lullaby, bye
      Go to sleep my baby dear
      Mother sings lullaby.
      Lullaby, bye

      We are all dressed in white dresses and stockings, the boys white pants a nd stockings. Then the little boy dreams he is going away in an airshi p to see Santa Claus. Then there is Santa land with trees covered with sn ow. Each child is a tree. Then we go into Santa’s home. There are the e lves and reindeer, The Elves and fairies are all helping Santa. Then afte r they have all …….Santa they all ---
      and sing this song
      We’re going back in our airship to tell our sojurn
      To the happy home of Santa where someday we’ll return
      To the happy home of Santa where someday well return

      Then mother puts the little boy to bed and Santa comes with the reindee r and bring presents and fill his stockings. He awakens in the morning an d rubs his eyes and says, “ Oh Mama, I went to the home of Santa Clause . I didn’t dream it did I?
      Then we all sang this song.
      The trees are green and leafless,
      Jack Frost rides through the air.
      The wind sweeps from the mountain
      O’er mead and meadows bare
      But in our hearts is glowing
      the warmth of summertime
      The bells ring sweet the story
      Dear Santa comes they chime
      Santa, Dear Santa, the children’s friend
      No matter what nation or name.
      From east to west from pole to pole
      Dear Santa loves all the same
      Dear Santa loves all the same
      There were some other songs, Alice Kimball and Anna Pace sang a song.
      They had a tableau, when all the children were on stage. It was so beauti ful, The children all marched around in rhythm. I had to march with Jimmi e Stinson. My cousins Zilla Cluff and Wilda Moody pointed their fingers a t me and laughed, I put my hand over my mouth to keep from laughing. Som e one in the audience said isn’t that beautiful,
      When they lit the powder for the tableau, one little lady started runnin g up the stairs to the stage calling, “Annie! my Annie! the house is o n fire!” Everyone laughed and someone stopped her and told her what i t was. They almost had to knock her in the head to make her sit down. Tha t was the funny part of it.
      Aunt Emma Cluff was President of the Primary. She loved to put on play s . She had no sooner finished one then she started another. We loved the m, Me especially. Everyone she put on, I had a part besides I always I a lways sang a solo or duet in between scenes.
      One evening Aunt Susie invited Grandma to a party or Home evening. Whe n they had a party, it was a party! Elizabeth played the piano so beautif ully. Then she and Reba got to dancing. They had a large round table. On e would jump upon it and do a little dance then the other. I was abo u t 8 or 9 yrs so I jumped up on the table and started doing a jig. Ever y m outh was wide open. They said “We didn’t know you could dance!† I said “I didn’t either” Aunt Emma was there and she said I’ m going to have you dance in my shows and she did.
      She had her boy Chester and I sing a song and this is it:
      Just We Two
      (Girl) Would you know how first I met him
      bold light hearted free
      Through the fields with clover scattered
      came he first to me
      Midst the blossoms there
      I thought him All on earth divine
      And with the falling of the shadows
      my heart was no more mine
      (Chorus) Just we two, no Papa around, no mama near.
      Just we two with no one there to interfere.
      Just the bluebells at our feet
      heard the whispered love words sweet
      Joy, Love, bliss complete
      only just we two.
      (Boy) Would you know how first I met her
      Shy and simply sweet
      Picking poppies that were growing,
      just beneath her feet.
      Midst the blossoms there
      I thought her quite a dream complete
      And with the tinkle of the blue bells
      My heart began to beat.
      Then when we had finished, He stepped back, Elizabeth Claridge went in t o a tune called the “Irish Washa Woman and I went into my dance whil e he clapped. When I finished I threw the audience a kiss and bowed myse lf out and hid behind the wings. The audience clapped and clapped and cla pped. Finally Aunt Emma found me and said you’ve got to go out there a nd do that dance again, which I did. At first I was scared, but when I s aw the faces of the people smiling at me, I smiled back. They clapped m e back the third time. I guess I looked kind of cute, my hair was in rin glets to way below my waist. Whenever I went to town, everyone I met wou ld hug me and say there’s the little dancer. I had so many wonderful th ings happen to me. Another song I sang in another play was this.

      I’m the merriest girl that’s out.
      With laughter and good humor, Girls
      I pass my time away
      And while I’m here I’ll do my best
      to please you with my day
      Come along and join with me
      and raise a merry shout
      Perhaps I am and always was
      the merriest girl that’s out.
      Chorus: Now then young girls don’t be melancholy
      Just see like me if you can’t be jolly.
      If my beau goes back on me
      I never sulk nor pout
      It pleases him and it don’t hurt me
      for I’m the merriest girl that’s out.
      To balls and parties I go out
      for dancing and admire
      And waltzing is the thing I love
      of which I never tire.
      Come along and join with me
      and raise a merry shout
      Perhaps I am and always was
      the merriest girl that’s out.

      Then they always had me go into my dance.

      The summer after that my Aunt Laura Fitzpatrick came to see Grandma (Sh e was Uncle Henry Moody’s wife but he died with typhoid fever and the l ittle Paloma died soon after) Aunt Laura had another baby after she marri ed William Fitzpatrick, whose name was Helen. I always loved babies, s o I held that baby nearly all the time she was there. Aunt Laura said; ⠀I would like for you to come and stay with me.”
      “Oh! Could I Grandma?” “You’ll have to ask your Papa,” she said . So awa y I ran to meet Papa who was just coming home. I told him what A unt Laur a had said. “Can I, Papa? He said, “I’ll see”. I said ⠀Si” means yes! So away I ran to tell Aunt Laura I could go.
      When we got off the train, Aunt Laura’s husband met her and took the ba by and the suitcase. I was carrying mine. I tugged at Aunt Laura’s dres s and said, “He doesn’t know I’m here?” She said, ”Oh, excuse m e, Fitz, this is my little niece Lizzie Moody,” He said, “Well isn’ t that nice. I love little girls.” From that moment I loved him. He wa s always so sweet to me.
      The next day a man by the name of Tony Neary came to see Aunt Laura. He u sed to board at her place, when she had the Moody boarding house before s he married. He looked at me and said, “What have we here? Who’s this ? ’ Aunt Laura says, “It’s my little niece Lizzie Moody.” He look ed at me with those blue eyes and bushy red eyebrows and said, “Well an other Mormon come to town”. I answered indignantly, ”I’d rather b e a Mormon than an old red-haired Irishman like you.” I never saw anyon e laugh like he did. From then on we were good friends. Every time he ca me he would give me a dime. Aunt Laura had two roomers and they would gi ve me dimes every day or two. I guess they didn’t get to see little gir ls very often. I was always so happy and friendly to everyone.
      Aunt Laura gave me some jelly glasses to take home, so I filled one of t hem full, of the dimes the men had given me. One of her friends, Ora Zum ont gave me dimes and one night she took me to the show, she and her boyf riend. It was not a movie show it was the silent pictures. I enjoyed it v ery much and I thought how nice it was to pay so much attention to a litt le girl.
      One day Aunt Laura said, ”Lizzie, do you think you could tend the bab y while I go shopping?” “Oh yes,” I said. So I did. And when she ca me back all loaded down with bundles, She bought material for five dresse s for me. She later took me and bought two pair of shoes and a beautifu l hat. It was a beautiful lacey straw with large daisies and lilies of th e valley. She bought more chiffon and ribbons to put on it. I had six pai r of stockings.
      She said, “Lizzie, how do you want your dress made?” I said,” Mak e it plain, because Grandma and Papa delight in plainness.” Well, sh e frilled that dress with lace and insertion and ribbons. She bought bea utiful blue ribbons for my sash and hair. Then red and pink ribbons for e very day. Well, I never had such fancy clothes in my life and never s o many. I was really a Cinderella. Every day she would send me to the lit tle store to buy candy and nuts. She always had fruit cake and fruit on t he table. She wanted me to stay with her and live with her and be her lit tle girl. She said she would give me music lessons and dancing lessons, B ut Pa pa said no. He wanted to keep us all together. Our little sister wa s living with my Aunt Katurah in Old Mexico. She was the little baby whe n Mama died and Aunt had no children, so he let her take the baby to rai se. She stayed there until she was nine years old when the Saints were ru n out of Mexico. [1912] I used to pray for the Lord to bring my littler s ister home and he did.
      Well, I stayed at Aunt Laura’s for two months. I loved every minute o f it. She was so good to me. One dumb thing I did when I was there was th is. She sent me to the store to get some cards to send home to my folks . Like I said I always like babies so here I come home with cards sayin g the arrival of a baby. It said when arrived. I thought it meant whe n I arrived in Globe. When Fitz came home and saw the cards, he said, “ Well, what do we have here? Laura why didn’t you tell me?” They bot h laughed and she explained it all to me later. I exchanged them.
      I learned a crazy song from her phonograph. One of those with discs an d a horn looked like a morningglory flower.

      One rainy day my wife and I
      Went down the street a shopping
      We saw a lot of pretty girls
      The rain was fastly dropping
      To keep their dresses from the mud
      They kept them up quite high
      And when my wife said, Bob come on
      You ought to of heard me cry,
      Never, never, Oh, I could
      see them big fat legs forever
      Once my wife’s mother came
      to stay a week oh, brother
      She stayed a week and that was
      one week longer than the other.
      And when was time for her to go
      My wife she cried and cried.
      To have you go and leave me so
      My heart within replied
      Ever, ever I hope she goes
      and stays away forever.

      A crazy song for a, little girl to learn. No wonder all the men in tow n h ad me sing it over and would they laugh, In those days it was somethi ng t o see a woman’s ankles. But now it’s something else. While I wa s in Globe , we lived not too far from the smelter. I could sit in the wi ndow and wa tch them dump the slag. T’was melted rock. They poured it o ut of big iro n cars at night, it was really beautiful to see that hot me lted rock pou r down the hill. They took me through the smelter and tol d me how they se parated the real copper from the rock which was called o re.
      That was really something, that trip to Aunt Laura’s in Globe. Even t h e ride on the train was something else. I had never done that before.
      There were three little neighbor girls living with their father. They we r e French. One was named Mary, one Victorine, one Annie. he called the m i n to supper one evening and I went with them. He broke off a chunk o f Fre nch bread and gave them each a tiny glass of wine. That was their s upper . He offered me some but I told him I already had my supper.. Whe n I wen t home we always had bread and milk. I guess that would have bee n strang e to them.
      We had a large grape vineyard at home, but we never thought of making wi n e out of them. I was going home on the train; who should I see but m y fr iends. Their father was taking them to a Catholic convent. Little An nie w as carsick. I thought what if our father had sent us away to a conv ent in stead of taking care of us himself? If it hadn’t been for Grandm a, I don’ t know what we would have done.
      When Rulon was about five and I was eight or younger we were coming ho m e from town when it began to thunder and lightning then suddenly it ju s t poured down. We lived a mile from town. No place to go to get out o f th e rain so we ran as fast as we could, but by the time we reached hom e w e were soaked through. When we got there, we called and called, ”Pa pa, Pa pa,” but no answer, so we went over to Aunt Lula’s and knocke d on the do or. She opened the door and said, “Oh, you children go hom e and get som e dry clothes on.” Well, we went home and I said, ”It w on’t do us any goo d to go back over there, because our clothes will b e just as wet as befor e.”
      So we changed into our nightgowns, and pulled down the blinds and crawl e d into bed and covered our heads to keep out the sound of the thunder . Ru lon began to cry so I said, “Don’t cry honey, let’s kneel dow n and ask th e Lord to bring Papa home. So we got back into bed, when w e heard Papa sc raping his feet on the porch. We jumped out of bed and th rew our arms aro und Papa and said, ”Papa, the Lord brought you to us.⠀ He said, ”I was s tanding on the porch of the meat market wonderin g what to do. Because I w as afraid you little children would be home alo ne, when Brother Bigler ca me by in a buggy. I ask him for a ride and her e I am.” And were we ever g lad to see him.
      You children, who have mothers and fathers to come home to, really shou l d appreciate them. You just don’t know what it is to not have a mothe r.
      Papa built a fire in the fireplace and took us on his lap and starte d t o sing. We always joined in. He always sang when anything was wrong . He w as the best Papa in the world. Everybody in (town) said he was on e in a m illion.
      Here is a little song we used to sing. Glenna played the organ and taug h t this song.

      Two little children, a boy and a girl,
      Sat by an old church door.
      Two little children, a boy and a girl,
      Sat by an old church door.
      Their poor little feet were as brown as the curls
      That fell and the dress she wore.
      The boys hat was tattered and torn were his shoes
      A tear fell in each little eye
      Why don’t you go home to your mama she said?
      And this was the maiden’s reply.

      Chorus Mama’s in heaven, they took her away.
      Left Jim and I alone.
      We came here to sleep, at the close of the day
      for we have no mama nor home.
      We can’t earn our bread, we’re too little she said,
      Jim’s five years and I’m only seven
      There’s no one to love us since Papa is dead
      and our darling mama’s in heaven.

      I can’t remember the other verse but I know it told how the woman too k th em home to live with her.

      We sure learned some sad songs in those days. They just kind of fit u s , I guess. Linda came back from Mexico when she was nine. She was a cu t e little thing. We loved her, but sometimes teased her too much. I gav e h er all my dolls ands dishes. I was fifteen then and had outgrown al l thos e things. She was supposed to live with Aunt Katurah but she like d to b e with us. She hadn’t had brothers and sisters before so she spe nt most o f her time with us. Besides there were Aunt Lula Layton’s ch ildren to pl ay with. They lived just across the street.
      When I was just in the fourth grade Grandma sent me with a little wago n t o get some chicken feed from Papa. It was early in the morning befor e sch ool. I had to go a mile. I ran as fast as I could pull the wagon. P apa pu t a hundred-pound sack of grain in the wagon. I pulled it as fas t as I co uld back to Grandma’s. I was really huffing and puffing whe n I got back t o Grandma’s
      Well, when I got back it was almost time for school. Aunt Suzie came t o t he door. I said, “I’m not going to school. I’ll be late and I h aven’t bee n late this year.” She said go on you’ll make it and s o I ran as hard a s fast as I could. I had to go several blocks, When I r eached the corne r from the school of the fence across the street; I coul d see the class l ined up and the teacher standing there. They all turne d around and yelle d “Hurry Lizzie! You’ll make it.” And you kno w my teacher held up the cl ass until I got there. Wasn’t that sweet o f her? I was all out of breath , so she had one of the boys go out to th e pump and get me a drink. Every body was always so good to me.
      When I got home to grandma’s for lunch, my sister Ida had a baby girl . Th at’s why they sent me after the chicken feed, and why Aunt Suzi e was the re so early in the morning. That was Mildred.

      Fifth Grade. When I was in the fifth grade Miss Dolly Sutton was my teac h er. She was lots of fun. She read books for us each morning for ten o r fi fteen minutes. Like “Tom Sawyer” and the “Call of the Wild,† She wore he r dresses long and flat heels on her shoes. I guess her fee t were quite l ong. One of the boys said she sent him to the shoemaker t o get her shoe s fixed and he came back and said, “He said he didn’ t mend rowboats.” Th ey used to go behind her and measure her footprin ts. She was so good natu red we loved her.
      She gave readings one about ‘He Was There and So Was I’ It was so cu te a bout a little boy watching his sister make love. That’s the way Ru lon an d I did. June and Don. One night Don brought her a large box of c andy, a nd they had it on the end of the porch, they were so engrossed i n each ot her they didn’t see us take the box of around the corner of t he house an d we each took a few pieces then we quietly slipped it back . I guess Do n wondered how June could eat so much candy.
      I was beginning to notice the boys about this time. There was a littl e b oy in my class names Leon McDonald. I thought he was so cute. He use d t o clamp my braids down in the ink well (of course, there was no ink i n it ). He had a turned-up noe and I would turn around in my seat and pus h m y nose up at him. One day I had my hair in curls and a bunch of boy s hel d me and cut off one of my curls. My teacher sure got after them an d Gran dma didn’t like it either because it took a long time for it t o grow ou t so it could be braided in. I didn’t care, I was just glad t hat they wou ld pay that much attention to me.
      One day we girls were playing Jack’s out on the lawn at recess. One o f t he boys kept teasing us, by putting grass down the back of our necks . Ann a Reneer got up and took him down and sat on him and filled his mou th wit h grass. He didn’tother us any more. June gave me a party. Ther e came t his little boy Wayne Skousen, he held my hand. I thought he wa s cute.

      Sixth Grade. In the sixth grade we had a Mr. Beauregard for a teacher . H e was nice, only when he seated each one he put me in B class, I ha d alwa ys been in A class before, and I told him about it. He said that r emain s to be seen. So it went that way for a month until we had our mont hly ex ams. I got a 100% on all of them so he said Lizzie you really do b elong i n “A” class. So I was back where I belonged.
      I sat with Anna Reneer. She was a real tomboy. One morning she came i n w ith her hand in her pocket and she whispered to me “Take your penci ls ou t of that box and open it up carefully. I’ve got a mouse and don⠀™t you da re let him loose.❠I tried to put the lid down quickly but i t wasnt quic k enough, The mouse got away. Some of the girls began to scr eam A mouse , a mouse! There was really commotion around there for a whil e girls clim bing upon there seats, the boys laughing. Anna trying to cat ch the poor l ittle scared mouse. She finally caught it, but he teacher m ade her take i t outside. She had a string around its tail so she just ti ed it up unti l recess, but one of the boys got it, and she threw rocks a t him until h e let it go.
      One day we were having sewing class and Anna just unceremoniously pick e d up a bottle of ink and poured it down Alice Kimball’s neck. She wa s exp elled for that, for a while at least. Another time she was sent out side a nd saw someone’s hore and saddle tied up to a field. She got o n it and r ode around until recess.
      We had picnics at Cluff’s Ranch. We rode on a hayrack. They covered t h e wagon with straw then spread a large canvas tarp over it. It was pull e d by two horses It was about ten miles out there and we sat with our fe e t hanging off and danglig and singing all the way. There were large cot t onwood trees, always a large swing. We each took our lunch. It was so m uc h fun climbing up the hills and the little pug nosed boy would take m y ha nd and help me up the hill. I could have run up it but I liked the a ttent ion he gave me. We had a party and they had me sing. I sang
      Funny Little Freckles
      Next door to me there lives a boy who has a funny smile
      I’ve only known this little boy, For just a little while.
      But yesterday he kissed me through the pickets in the fence
      Although he’s funny looking it just made me feel immense
      One night we stood and talked together at the garden gate
      It’s funny but I didn’t know that it was getting late.
      But when I heard my mama call, It gave me such a scare,
      I grabbed him round his funny neck and kissed him then and there.
      Chorus: He has funny little freckles on his funny little nose
      and he’s funny lookin even when he wears his Sunday clothes

      But when he holds my hand in his I’m happy as can be.
      And I wonder if this funny little boys loves me.
      I don’t know whats the matter but I have a funny way
      of thinking of this little boy all through the live long day

      He’s scratched my name on fences And he’s carved it on a tree
      It’s on his reader, spelling book and big geography
      Last night he didn’t come to me at the garden gate,
      Although I waited patiently ‘til quarter after eight.
      And when I had to go to bed I just laid down and cried
      I dreamed he was a fairy prince, and I his fairy bride.

      This certain little boy always blushed when I sang this song.

      Seventh Grade Mr. Henry Mathews was our teacher. He was really nice t o m e. When I took Palmer Method Penmanship he would come by each of us t o se e how we were doing and he always patted my arm. When ever the clas s want ed to go on a picnic they would say, Lizzie you ask him, he’ll l et you d o anything. One day I was in the hall at noon, one of the girl s was playi ng the organ, I was dancing funny, but I didn’t know my tea cher was stand ing in the door looking at me. I squealed and ran.
      One evening after school he asked me to stay after school. Gee! I was s c ared, I didn’t know what I had done. He went on correcting papers. No t ev en looking up, finally I asked why he was keeping me. He said “Oh ! jus t to keep me companynd if you will sing Funny Little Freckles to m e yo u may go. “
      “If that’s all you want then I’m going home,” I ran out the door . He jus t laughed at me.
      On April Fool’s Day some of the kids suggested we all run away to th e ri ver and play hooky. Well they finally got all the seventh and eight h grad es to but three girls. Ruth Tenny, Myrtle Cole, and Anna Pace. Wel l, th e teacher let them goome, but we had so much fun wading in the riv er. O f course we took our lunch. We didn’t get back until after five o ’clock , so we went by his hotel where he was staying and serenaded him . He cam e out on the balcony and applauded us. When we went to school ne xt day, h e greeted us with a smile, then he asked me to come to his des k and he ha nded me the foolscap paper to pass around. he said, “Every one put away y our books and be ready for a stiff examination, those wh o don’t pass wil l not be promoted.” We were really scared until h e gave us the questions . They were so simple I think that a fourth grade r could have answered th em. Were we ever relieved. But we didn’t try i t again. At the end of scho ol, he gave us a banquet at the hotel. He di dn’t teach us the next year.
      Anna Pace sat with me in the seventh grade. She sat with me most of t h e grade when I was in the B class in the sixth grade I sat with a gi r l I won’t say her name because someone might know who I am talking ab out . She copied all my lesson, even my drawings. She would ask me to le t he r look at them, then she would trace them and just ruin mine. I wa s so gl ad when my teacher put me in ‘A class. Although Anna Reneer wa s a tombo y and did such thoughtless things, I liked her. I felt sorry f or her bec ause she had no mother and had lived with her father in Texa s on a cattl e ranch, where she had had her own way, then he had died an d she had to c ome to Thatcher, Arizona and live with her brother.

      Eighth Grade When I was in the eighth grade I was sick a lot. Papa w a s sick and had to go to the hospital in California to be operated on f o r cancer. We were so worried about him. I got real sick. I never knew w ha t was the matter, but I know now that I had low sugar and not having t h e proper diet I would pass out. we called it fainting spells. But I man ag ed to get through the eighth grade and graduate. We had a beautiful gr adu ation class and exercises. One reason was that Della Bingham and I sa n g a duet.
      Glenna and June got married that year. Glenna in the spring and June i n t he fall. That left me as the head of the house. No, I got that wrong , Pap a was the head, but I was the housekeeper. Rulon was home but he an d Lind a went to school. I washed their clothes, and ironed them. I eve n ha

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] Web: Arizona, Find A Grave Index, 1861-2011.

    2. [S13] 1900 United States Federal Census, Year: 1900; Census Place: Precincts 1, 5, 6, 7, 10, 12, and 13, Graham, Arizona Territory; Roll: 45; Page: 28B; Enumeration District: 0021; FHL microfilm: 1240045.

    3. [S14] Childhood Journal of Elizabeth Moody (Crandall), Hand written Journal of Elizabeth Moody Crandall transcribed by her Grand.
      Childhood Journal of Elizabeth Moody Crandall I was born Dec 5th 1896 i n Thatcher, Arizona My Father was Francis Winfred Moody and my Mother wa s Malinda Gimlin Lewis.I had five brothers and five sisters Francis Winf red Moody (md. Charlotte Smith) Samuel Lewis Moody (md. Ida Bingham) Edwa rd Moody (md Hazel Patterson) Ida Katurah Moody (Merrill) (Ernstsen ) Glenna Moody (md. Frank Martineau) June Moody (md. Don Curtis) Rulo n Moody (md. Emily and Aytha) Malinda Moody (md. Howard McBride , md. Crips Wilson)And there were two children born between Ida and Glenn a, John and Eunice, who died in infancy, and myself made eleven children . Our mother died when I was only six years old. We had a mite of a str uggle after she died. Winnie was married when mother died. Sam marrie d 2 years after. So did Ida. Ida was only fifteen when mother died. Tha t left her to be the housekeeper and do the sewing, washing, ironing, coo king, and caring for the little two-week-old baby and us. June was eigh t years old and Glenna was ten. Grandmother Moody took Rulon and I fo r a while, then the whole family moved in with her for a while, but it pr oved too much for Grandmother so they all moved back home. Of course Id a had married before we went to Grandmas’. After that June and Glenna h ad to take over. They did pretty good too. But it was hard. It always fel l my lot to wash the dishes and dust the furniture, June loved to cook an d Glenna loved to sew. I liked to cook but they thought I was too little . I was only one and a half years younger that June. I can’t remember m uch about mother, but I can remember when she died. I was out in the back yard playing with a little girl named Julia Farley; Her mother was takin g care of our mother. I remember Julia screamed loudly and I said. “Oh , Julia, you mustn’t scream like that. My mother is awful sick. Just th en June came running out where we were and said to come quick, mamma wa s dying. I’ll never forget that scene. Mother was on the bed, trying t o talk but couldn’t. Papa holding Rulon, who was three, Winnie was cryi ng and rubbing her feet. We were all around the bed crying. I cry now thi nking how terrible it was, losing our dear mother. No one knows what a t errible tragedy it was. Not only for we children, but Papa, poor darling , how he must have suffered. He never remarried. Just took care of us. Ev eryone said he was one Father in a million. So good, kind, and patient wi th us children. After mother died, I remember him taking all four of we c hildren, Glenna, June, Rulon, and myself, down to the lower field. We wer e playing in the sand in an irrigation ditch, while he worked in the fiel d. Glenna got behind some willows and screamed like a wildcat. (Papa ha d killed one a day or two before) it frightened us so we cried. He had t o take us all back to the house before he could resume his work. This al l happened when we lived in Central, I’m getting ahead of my story . I can’t remember too much of my mother, but there are a few things t hat I can remember. I remember when we all had smallpox. I had less tha n anyone so mama let me wait on some of the others. After we had all ha d them, Papa came down. He was left covered with them. I remember Mama go ing over each smallpox with a swab with cream on it. And Winnie had typh oid fever Oh! He had it bad. I remember mother feeding him steak, but wat ching every bit. She would let him chew it then spit it out. He would cry , ”Just let me swallow one bite” I remember we had home made carpet s on the floor. It was so nice when Papa and Mama would put fresh clean s traw, under a new clean carpet. It always smelled so fresh and clean. I n the evening we would gather around the fireplace and sing songs and Mam a would play the organ. Papa would hold me or Rulon on his lap or we woul d lie down by the fire.I was three when Rulon was born. Grandma Moody too k care of mother. He was born the 7th of November and it was cold, so Gra ndma put Rulon down to the foot of the bed where she had a hot iron to ke ep him warm, also mama’s feet. He screamed and when they took him up hi s big toe was badly burned. It never grew back straight but stuck straigh t up. Mama had had four girls besides Little Eunice who died in infancy . And little Johnny who died when 2 and a half years old. Oh how Papa lov ed little Johnny. He said the little fellow would cry to go with him. Sai d he was the only one in the family with blue eyes and sandy red hair . I can’t remember hearing Papa say what caused Johnnie’s death or Eu nice’s. So Rulon coming after all those girls, so naturally we lavishe d our love on that little boy. Papa took him with him everywhere that h e could. One time one of the hired hands gave me a sack of candy, Rulon w as not there at the time, so I put it in a drawer and wouldn’t eat a bi te until Rulon got there. We didn’t get candy very often. One day ou r cousin Arthur took Rulon and I with him, to bring a plow from the lowe r field. We were in a wagon with a high spring seat and as he put on th e brakes to go down into a ditch, Rulon and I slipped out. He was able t o catch Rulon, but I went out and under the wagon wheels and was hurt rea l bad. I lay unconscious for three days, with broken ribs. They had the E lders administer to me and I recovered. June fell out of the wagon one ti me and the wheels cut off one of her braids. There was a lot of traged y in those days. Yet we had a lot of happiness too. When Papa and Mama ma rried, they planted this Mulberry tree in our front yard and it grew to b e a big tree. Papa made a large swing with a swing board that was wide en ough for two. He also put a plank in the trunk of the tree where two coul d sit in it. We had more fun in and around that tree than a pack of monk eys. Aunt Lula Layton lived just across the street from us. She had twe lve children. Her oldest girl was the same age as Glenna. Blanche was he r name. Then Clyde was June’s age. Flossie was my age and Bertha (Berti e we called her) was Rulon’s age. Then there was Beatrice and Jessie, M arlon and Junius, Then Max and Chester. Aunt Lulu had one little boy Del bert who died before I could remember. But I do remember when Rex died. H e was a beautiful baby with big blue eyes and sandy red or more of a gold en hair. She always had such pretty babies. Flossie was always the one t o tend them. She always had one on her hip or in a baby buggy, She woul d have the baby’s face in the sun, so one day I said to her, “Why don ’t you put an umbrella over his face so the sun won’t get in his eyes ?” She answered, “ Because he has to shut his eyes, and he will soo n go to sleep.” Which I found out he did. Then we could play. But I tho ught it was fun to push the baby in a carriage. We had other neighbors , Grandma Hendricks. (We just called her that) and her daughter whom we c alled Aunt Susie and her husband Uncle Tom Merrill. They had a little gi rl my age named Zilpha. We loved each other and had a lot of fun together . We all played under the mulberry tree. We made horses and cows from th e gourds, which grew along the ditch bank. We made mud pies and Adobe Hou ses and rag dolls. We pulled our dolls along in a shoebox with a string t ied on it to pull by. We made our own amusement. In the spring when the a pple trees were in bloom we made wreaths to put on our heads and long tra ins made from cottonwood leaves pinned together with sticks, I was the qu een and the others were my princes and princesses. Or we would play in t he barn and swing on the derrick rope from the bailed hay to the loose ha y, which was soft and smelled so nice. On Sunday after noon we would hav e Sunday School and I would always lead in the singing. We learned all th e songs by heart this way. Like: Catch the sunshine though it flickers T hrough a dark and dusty cloud. Though it falls so dark and feeble In a he art with sorrow bowed Catch it quickly it is passing, Passing rapidly awa y, It has only come to tell you There is but a brighter day. We used t o sing: Oh I had such a pretty dream mama Such pleasant and beautiful thi ng Of a dear little nest in the meadows of rest’ Where the birdie her l ullaby sings Of a dear little nest in the meadows of rest Where the birdi e her lullaby singsI saw there a stream full of lilies, Pressed over th e green mossy stones And just where I lay a thin sparkling spray Sang swe etly in delicate tones And just where I lay a thin sparkling spray Sang s weetly in delicate tonesAnd as it rolled on toward the ocean Through mead ows and pretty sunbeams Each note grew more deep and I soon fell asleep A nd was off to the Island of dreams Each note grew more deep and I soon fe ll asleep And was off to the Island of dreams I saw there a beautiful Ang el Al clothed and bespangled with dew She touched me and spoke and I qui ckly awoke And I found that Dear Mama Twas you She touched me and spoke a nd I quickly awoke And I found that Dear Mama Twas youPapa used to have R ulon and I sing that song together and another called Hello Central Giv e Me Heaven. Papa, I’m so sad and lonely, Sobbed a tearful little chil d Since mama’s gone to heaven Papa darling you’ve not smiled I will s peak to her to come home Just you listen and I’ll call her Through th e telephone Hello Central, give me heaven For my mama’s there You can f ind her with the angels On the golden stair She’ll be glad it’s me wh o’s speaking Call her won’t you please For I want to surely tell he r We’re so lonely hereWhen the girl received this message Coming o’e r the telephone How the heart thrilled me that moment And the wire seeme d to moan I will answer just to please her Yes. dear heart I’ll soon co me home Kiss me mama, kiss your darling O’er the telephone.These were s uch sad songs for two little motherless kids to sing, but we never refuse d to sing when asked. He even woke us from our sleep to sing to Hazel, Ed d’s girlfriend, and now his wife. We were always busy playing with s o many playmates. We would all gather in a circle and sing Ring Around th e Roses and if it would start to rain, “Ring Around the Rafter, Pour do wn faster”. If it did start to pour, we would quickly scatter to our ho mes. We liked to swing on the big gate that went into Uncle Oscar's stock yard. He didn’t like for us to do this because it made the gate sag. On e day he got after Flossie for doing this and I called him a fool. Of cou rse he told my mother and she really gave me good talking to. I never rem ember her of Papa either ever spanking us. The older children said Papa w hipped them hard. I remember one of them telling Papa, “You would hav e whipped us for that” Papa answered, I have learned better, Not tha t we didn’t need it sometimes. But we were pretty good children most o f the time. Speaking of neighbors, Grandma Hendrick's had many daughters , so it seems, there was one Mandy Price. She had a little girl my age, A rtie, one Glenna and June’s ages and a little boy who was drug to deat h by a horse. He had the rope wrapped around his around his hand and coul dn’t loosen it. I remember their father killed a hog one day and he too k a cup and drank the blood. They even made blood pudding. I told my moth er about this and she said he was English and it was a custom there at th at time, It seemed repulsive to me. There was Aunt Nancy Smith I rememb er one little girl named Bell and Ida’s age named Pearl. I came to kno w Pearl and liked her in later years. They all moved away, seems like, be fore or after mama died, I can’t remember. But I do remember we liked t hem very much and I remember them gathered in the on the lawn sewing carp et rags and Zilpha and Bell and Artie and Flossie playing together whil e the older one’s talked and laughed and sewed. We went into the grap e vineyard and gathered bunches of luscious grapes. I remember Grandma Le wis moved in with us, I can’t remember for how long. She had Jane, Josi e, and Arthur with her. They were her grandchildren. Aunt Elvira’s Chi ldren. That’s another story. They didn’t live there long, because th e little house they lived in, we called the grainery was moved up clos e to our house making an extra bedroom upstairs and a dining room downsta irs. I remember on my fifth birthday Aunt Lorrie and her Daughter Anni e came to see us and I said, “Today’s my birthday, but we only have b read and gravy.” That was in the winter and we had plenty of canned fru it, or dried. I know we had a large orchard, all kinds of apples, peaches , pears, apricots, and plums. The Satsuma plums, Papa called them the str awberry plum. I loved to crawl in the irrigation ditch, and gather blackb erries in the spring of the year. Great big luscious berries under the vi nes where it was damp and cool, it made them larger and sweeter. Papa al ways had a garden. Rulon and I liked to follow along behind the plow an d gather little potatoes, they grew on the roots of some kind of a bush o r weed. I don’t know what it was called (Murphy Potato). Mama made a ho arhound candy from one weed. Hoarhound. She made a cough syrup to cure ou r cough. I remember when she pulled a large pan of custard from the oven . She gave me a taste, Oh, it was good. We had pickles by the barrel an d Papa always bought sugar by the hundred pound sack. I remember one tim e a skunk got in the kitchen and sprayed. Papa had to bury a sack of suga r and one of potatoes. We had to eat outside for a while. We had a well w ith an oaken bucket on the end of a rope. The rope went through a pulle y then there was another bucket on the end of the rope. I remember whe n my Uncle Henry died. They had bottles of ice all around him. It must ha ve been summer. They did this to keep him. There were no undertakers the n. Grandma Moody was doctor, undertaker, and midwife. Not only that, sh e ran a boarding house, but that was before my time. I remember Mama stop ping at Grandma Moody’s, and Grandma gave us a piece of mincemeat pie , it was so good. She served it on her real china plates. I loved those p retty plates with pretty blue flowers on them. After Mama died, Rulon an d I lived with Grandma. She would let us eat out of one of those dishes i f we were good.I remember Mama taking Rulon and I to Pima to buy her a ne w hat at sister Gustavison’s hat shop. We stopped to see Aunt Mary Jud d who lived in Pima. Aunt Mary was real fat. I believe she was heavier t han Grandma Lewis. But Grandma Lewis was shorter. I take after her. Dar n it. My mother was real slender. I don’t think she ever weighed more t han 117 lbs. She was very active. Did so many things in her short life . She took a nursing class when Rulon was a baby. Ida took care of the ba by and cooked for the family, then carried the baby a mile to where mothe r was for him to nurse. I guess Rulon and Linda had the easiest life of a ny of the family. Still after the girls married, I had a hard time but a t the time I didn’t think it was so bad.Besides farming, Papa used to f reight. That is he hauled produce from the valley to Globe. I guess tha t was before my time too.There is part of a little poem Mama taught me an d it went like this; You needn’t be trying to comfort me I tell you m y dolly is dead. How do you think she could live? With a crack like tha t in her head . Then there was a little song she used to sing to her babi es;Early in the morning, take your baby out, Let him smell the cool fres h air, Feed him o bananas he’ll never get the gout, Tie a yellow ribbo n in his hairI remember her bed was so pretty, with a white bedspread an d pillow shams, starched stiff and embroidered by Mama. Then there were v elvet cushions that she had painted flowers on. We never thought of getti ng near her bed. So far that is all I can remember of the things that hap pened before we moved to Central. Papa bought a farm and dairy from Alfr ed Cluff, but he kept our place in Thatcher. Sam and Ida ran that farm an d lived in the house.Now, I can’t remember moving but I do remember ou r first Christmas in Central. This was considered a very nice brick house . A large parlor with nice furnishings. A beautiful blond or walnut or wa s it maple organ. Ida took a few lessons and one song I remember she an d some of the young folks singing; Think I’ll marry Bill He wrote m e a letter, Let me tell you what was in it, said if I didn’t marry hi m he wouldn’t live a minute. He said if I didn’t marry him he wouldn ’t live a minute He said if I didn’t marry him he wouldn’t live a m inute I read the Blessed Bible It say’s you mustn’t kill, thought th e matter over Think I’ll marry Bill Think I’ll marry Bill Think I’l l marry Bill Thought the matter over Think I’ll marry BillWe sang man y beautiful songs especially at night around the fireplace. Popping cor n and making candy. One day I was playing with Stella Cluff, my cousin. A unt Lizzie and Uncle Jode owned the creamery. Mr. Norton was working the re. He lived in one of our houses on our place. Well we were just lookin g around and I spied that large churn. They had it all clean and nice s o I said to Stella, “You get in it and I will turn you around and the n you can turn me” So we turned each other until we were got tired the n Mr. Norton came and asked me if Mama sent for any thing. I Said, Yes ma ma wants some butter. We took our cream there, so I thought she might wan t some. He gave it to me and I started home. I was almost home when I sa w Mr. Norton coming behind me. ( He was going home to dinner but I though t he was coming after me because I knew mamma hadn’t wanted butter. I h ad punched a hole in it and was eating it.) Well I threw the butter ove r the fence and went into my little friend Letha Whitmers. When he had g one I went on home. When I opened the door they were eating dinner and w hat was the first thing I saw on the table? You guessed it! It was tha t pound of butter with the hole in the corner. I threw up my little hand s and exclaimed! Where did that come from? Every one laughed but I was as hamed and mama gave me a good talking to about telling a lie. I went to k indergarten, one thing I remember, my teacher was Hattie Bilby. She let m e pour water on my desk, then we splashed the water with our little hand s and sang this song:Pitter, patter comes the rain drop Truant raindrop s from on high When the sun comes he will catch them And will bring the m by a rainbow Back again within the sky.At Sunday School class the teach er asked if any one knew a song. Rulon held up his hand and got up and sa ng. She was gathering watercresses My little watercress gir-er-erl. She w as gathering watercresses My little watercress gir-er-erl.He sang it ove r and over until I had to get him and bring him to his seat. He was onl y three. It was really cute. I thought he was the cutest little boy I eve r saw. Of course I was prejudiced. There was another house close to the o ne we lived in. It was built for the hired help. Sam and Edd slept over t here. Evidently Rulon slept with them sometimes. As I remember them tell ing him they would give a nickel to the first one to fall asleep. Rulon s hut his eyes tight and said “I’m asleep,” We all loved that littl e boy.When June had her eighth birthday party, Papa gave me a nickel to b uy her a present I bought a package of gum. Stella Cluff and her brothe r Vervie and Rulon and I were going to the party. Well, we ended up chewi ng all the gum, and as we passed the canal, there were hundreds of littl e hoppy toads so I filled the sack that the gum was in and presented it t o June. When she opened the bag all those little toads hopped out and sh e screamed and Mama came out and they told her what I had done. She said , “That was a bright idea. They won’t hurt you dear.” She hugged Ju ne and kissed away her tears. Then Ida brought out cake and punch and al l was forgotten. Oh yes, home-made ice cream. June made her own cake. Sh e always liked to cook. I was always having bright ideas. I guess she go t other presents, I can’t remember.Mama took care of the sick a lot, an d I remember when Lillie Moody, Aunt Maybell, and Uncle Bill’s fourt h child was born, mama was helping or taking care of her. Uncle Bill gav e Blanch a nickel, and sent her and her brother Alphonso, my brother Rulo n and I to the store, just a block away. It was in February 1902. The le aves were all over the ground we were walking and laughing and kicking th e leaves along the way when Blanch lost her nickel, Now that was a real t ragedy. The little boys began to cry and we looked and looked and couldn⠀™t find it. I was the oldest of the bunch. I was six years old. So I sai d don’t cry, lets all kneel down and ask our heavenly father to help u s find it. So I gave a little prayer and as I put my hand on the ground t o get up off my knees. There was the nickel! Right under my hand! No on e was as surprised as I was. We all squealed with delight. We went up t o the store which was called, believe it or not, “Nichols” store. W e got five candy brooms. I can still taste them now they were a marshmall ow shaped like a broom covered with chocolate. Now they would cost a dim e each. We took the extra one home to Joe. The oldest boy. He was about e ight or nine. We must have been gone a long time for when we got back the re was a little new baby in Aunt Maybelle’s arms. Aunt Maybelle wa s a sweet little person. Her voice was so soft. I always loved to go ther e.I remember getting into a fight with Blanch because she said her mama w as better than mine. Uncle Bill separated us. He said they were both bett er. Yours is best for you, Blanch and yours is best for you, Grandma. H e always called me that. I guess because I had her name. Blanch always sa id her mother was a homely woman, said she never went anywhere. I don’ t if she ever went away from the place. She even had Blanch buy all the b aby clothes (I mean the cloth). She made all their clothes. She was a goo d cook and housekeeper. Mamma took good care of so many people. I rememb er her caring for a little boy named Joe Friendly who had typhoid.. I don ’t know why she took me with her. They lived down the field and acros s the railroad tracks. There was a lane going down there. We liked to wat ch the train go by. Sometimes we would put pins crossways and it looked l ike scissors. We liked to wave at the conductor. He would wave back. M ama worked so hard. She wanted us to have the nicest things. I wish she h adn’t worked so hard. Maybe she would have lived to take care of us. T he Christmas before she died was indeed the best Christmas we ever had. S he made new clothes for all of us, besides being pregnant and taking car e of sick people.I can remember how our dresses were made. Mine was pin k cashmere, with silk braid on it. I think Glenna’s and June’s were t he same but I can’t remember. There was a beautiful Christmas tree in t he parlor. The door was locked we couldn’t get in until everything wa s ready. There was also a tree at the church, everybody got bags of cand y and nuts, There was a program. They played games. I remember one whic h was called, “Here we go loopedy Loo, Here we go Loopedy Lee, Here w e go Loopedy Loo, all on a Christmas Night.” They lined all the child ren in two rows facing each other about three feet apart, Then someone ca me along and scattered candy. We could have all you could scramble for. I t was fun. Nowadays, they wouldn’t think of letting children eat cand y off the floor. They might have had paper on the floor. I can’t rememb er.Christmas evening Papa and mama opened the door of the parlor and le t us in. There was the beautiful tree all up with candles in little tin h olders. Of course I got a doll and June got dishes. Rulon got a little re d wagon and a small iron wagon pulled by a team of grey horses. A long ti me after he left them out in the rain. I told him they were dead so we bu ried them like they buried mama, that was long after mama died. Well, M ama had a wonderful dinner, with plum pudding, turkey and dressing grav y and mashed potatoes, just everything. We had almond trees I remember n o one could climb up to the top of those trees but me. I was just lik e a little cat. that reminds me of when mama was taking care of Inez Lee . Of course she took Rulon and I along. I think it was when Jessie was bo rn, when or the time of the year I can’t remember, but they had some li ttle kittens and when we had gone Mrs. Lee said “Mama, don’t this lit tle kitten look just like little Lizzie Moody?” Grandma Lewis lived u p close to Lee’s. I liked to go see her. I always loved old people. I s till love them even though I’m old now.Our house had a porch on it wit h banisters or railing whatever it was... ran from post to post. I used t o walk along them balancing myself as I walked across it. It was a beauti ful home, a front yard with grass and flowers and trees. Mama was proud o f it. She did everything to beautify the house and keep us looking nice . Even we children. She did more in her thirty seven years than most do i n twice that time. I can’t remember anymore before mama died. That wa s so terrible! No one knows what it is to lose your mother unless you g o through it. After she was dead, Aunt Susie Claridge took me home wit h her and somehow we were late to the funeral. I got to crying so hard Au nt Susie took me outside and talked to me, and I was able to go back ins ide, The wind blew hard going to the cemetery, then watching them put he r down in that deep hole and shoveling dirt her haunted me for years. I n ever liked to be alone after that.In the summer time we would take a quil t and go out on the lawn to sleep. We had no coolers or electricity then . When it was a new moon I would look up in the sky and think they had pu t mama’s coffin almost over the hole in the sky and only a little ligh t shown through. I thought the stars were holes in the sky and when it ra ined the water came through the holes, but when it wasn’t raining the l ight shone through the star holes and the big moon hole. I wasn’t sa d all the time. I had many fun times after Rulon and I went to live wit h Grandma Moody. When it was a real hot day Grandma would draw some wate r from the well and put it in a No, 2 wash tub. Then she would let us ge t in with our old clothes on (as we never heard of a swimming suit). We w ould splash around and then get out and run around and jump back in again . My what fun.I can’t remember when Papa moved back to Thatcher. I do r emember his selling the Central place to Orson Echols. He had two boys an d two girls. One boy’s name was Brian. When Orson was plowing his wif e got on his lap and put her arms around his neck and rode with him. I th ought that was so strange. Papa took one of us kids with him , but not Ma ma. I guess she never had time, what with nine children, and nursing th e sick and all. I don’t how she did it. Ida helped a lot. We had nice n eighbors in Central. The house across the street must have been a renta l because Jenkins lived there, Wallace Lorenzo and the twins Mary and Mar tha. Then there were the Tryons. I’ll never forget there was Mandy wit h aa new dress. Her father was killing a hog. I was watching with some o f the smaller children. Mandy comes out there with a new dress to show he r daddy. “Look Daddy, at my new dress”. He said, “Isn’t that beau tiful,? Reach me that stick so I can touch you”. He had blood all ove r his hands. But he took time out to compliment her on her new dress. I t hought that was so sweet. Then there was Nancy and deaf Davy Cluff. The y had two boys, Willy and Leo. A cow hooked Leo in the side and threw hi m up in the air, it made a big hole in his side.I had the typhoid fever a fter Mama died and I almost died, too. I was out of my head (now they sa y delirious). Glenna said they left her in the room to look after me whil e they ate supper. I kept saying, “I’m coming, Mama, take me with you .” Then I would talk to a little playmate who had just died named Gayth a Webster. She and her mother were the ones Mama took care of when she to ok sick and died after childbirth. Grandma was in Utah at the time and s he said had she been home to take care of Mama, she wouldn’t have died . But she put my name in the Temple to be prayed for and I got well. Ed d had the typhoid too, he said, but I can’t remember that. There wa s a lot of typhoid in those days. Open wells and things like that. Yo u know Ida must have had a hard time of it as she was only fifteen when m ama died. I remember when Ida was going to make her wedding dress. She wa s going up there in the buggy with Lottie. Seems as though Lottie was goi ng to help her make her dress. They rode clear up to Thatcher and got ou t at Lottie’s when Ida said, ”Oh! I lost my thimble.” I said “Her e it is”. They didn’t even know I was there, I hid under the seat. We re they surprised! Lottie had to fix me a bed on the floor. Ida was ou r second mother and when she married and went to Bisbee, we all saw her o ff at the train and some people thought it was a funeral, we all cried so . She was seventeen then. Seems as though I was back and fourth, Rulon a nd I were always together. Grandmother was a good mother to us.We had rel igion class after school and on the first of the month was fast day. Eac h child got up and bore their testimony. Each one said, “ I’m thankfu l for my mother and father, I know the gospel is true”. So when I sai d mine I said “I am thankful for my father and I am thankful I have a g ood grandma to take care of me.” Sister Coleman was my teacher and sh e got up in conference and told about little Lizzie Moody saying she wa s thankful she had a good grandma to take care of her. Grandma had tear s in her eyes and I said, “Grandma, why are you crying?” she said, †œBecause it makes me happy to know you love me.” “Oh! I do grandma , I love you better than anybody else in the world, except Papa.” She t ook Rulon and I to church and sometimes to Relief Society of which she wa s president. I didn’t start school until I was eight years old. I gues s it was because I had been sick with the typhoid fever, or maybe becaus e Grandma needed me to look after Rulon. We went to kindergarten in Centr al also in Thatcher, Rene McGuire was my teacher in Thatcher. I remembe r one game we played. She had a little box of soft colored balls made o f plush or yarn. Any way we thought they were pretty. We formed a circle , she let me take the box and sing out, “Greengages ripe, Greengages ri pe, who will buy my greengages ripe for the green ball,” The yellow wa s oranges, and cherries for the red and so on.At Christmas time we learne d this song- Merry, merry, merry, merry Christmas bells so sweetly chim e Of the happy voices of the breezes swell This merry, merry Christmas T ime. Peace on earth good will to men Let angel sing and sing again Let He arts and voices here below Join in the sweet refrain Oh Merry, merry, me rry, merry Christmas bells so sweetly chime Of the happy voices of the b reezes swell this merry, merry Christmas Time. Banish every thought of c are Let mirth and music fill the air Its hearts and voices here below Jo in me in the sweet refrainWhen I did start to the first grade Miss Rhode s was my teacher. I loved her for she was so sweet. I only stayed there u ntil Xmas and she promoted me to the second grade. Mrs. Coleman (Minnie ) was her name. I loved her. I always kissed her when school was out. On e day I was running to get in line after the bell had rung, just as I ra n around the corner, Frank Moody was coming around the other way and we b umped into each other. It knocked me out cold. Someone carried me into th e room and put me on a bench. Then Jimmie Duke (who was also a teacher) t ook me to Aunt Suzie’s and put me on her bed. When I came to Glenna wa s standing by me and she took me home. Evidently that was when we were a ll living at Grandmother’s. One day I was at the head of the class i n spelling and I had been sick the day before and when it came my turn t o spell doughnut, I spelled it donut. Everyone laughed, but I cried. So m y teacher said,” that’s all right, we won’t send Lizzie to the foo t of the class today because she wasn’t here when we had the word. I lo ved her for that. She gave parties for us at her home and at school. Thi s particular party we each had to bring a pie. I didn’t get to serve, A lice Kimball and Anna Pace were serving. I had brought a beautiful curren t pie, made by sister in law Ida, but I was served a piece of prune or dr ied plum it tasted like. Oh it was terrible! I just put it in the wasteba sket, where there were several other pieces there When I was in the thir d grade U.I. Paxton was our teacher. He was really a nice man, he reall y taught us spelling. We had to spell the word then put the markings. Lik e āil ǎll.We learned a song where six of us girls sang a round. No tha t was in the second grade. We had a music teacher whose name was E.M.W. J ones, he was from New York. He taught us this song. The hunter winds hi s bugle horn To horse, to horse, hello, hello The fiery courser sniffs th e morn And thronging helps the Lords pursue Up springs from yonder fier y thorn A deer more white than yonder thorn And louder rings the hunter s horn Hark forward, forward Hello, HelloWe had much enjoyment at school . But in the third grade, Mr. Paxton was singing a song; it went like th is only when he sang he screwed his mouth up in a little ball. I watche d him and I was screwing my mouth up the same way. I wasn’t even notici ng myself the song went like this.Tick, tock, tick, tock Can’t you hea r the old clock. Tick, tock, tick, tock, ticking all the day! Tick, tock , tick, tock Don’t you hear the old clock. Telling how the happy hour s speed away Hear the ding dong bell, Hear the ding dong bell Every yea r the same old story it must tellThen chorus, He saw me screwing my mout h just like his and he just kept on singing while he was walking down t o me. He reached over and took my arm and shook me. Oh was I ever embarra ssed? That was the only time I was ever chastised in school. I didn’t e ven know I was mocking him. It was so funny. At the end of the school ye ar, he took us all on a picnic. He and his brother owned the bottle works . So he brought several cases of soda pop. It sure tasted good. You could n’t buy it very often. We so seldom had had the nickel. People in thos e days had plenty to eat but little money. There were no radios or TVs s o we had to make our own amusement, You couldn’t go to the store and bu y a loaf of bread or a cake. You had to make your own. While I was stil l in the third grade, I went home with Bertha Bingham. Emma Smith went al so. It was on my way home. They had a large swing on a cottonwood tree. B ertha said, “First one to the swing, gets to swing first.” Of cours e I beat. I could out run any boy my age or out climb. Well, I started t o swing and Edna said, ”Don’t let her swing, She’s nothing but an o ld hobo without any ma.” Well, she won. I jumped out of the swing an d ran home as fast as I could go, crying all the way. The next day Edn a came up to me and put her arms around me and ask me to forgive her. He r father was the depot agent, there were tramps coming to the house askin g for food. She ask who they were so her mother told her they were peopl e without a mother or home so they called them Hobo’s. I had no mother , so she thought I was a hobo. After that we were real good friends. Ida ’s mother-in-law, Aunt Emma Merrill lived right next door to the schoo l house, so once in a while I would drop in to see her. This time she loo ked at my writing and said, ”Well that’s pretty good, I can read it.⠀ Then she went into the kitchen and brought me the biggest most delicio us piece of lemon pie I have ever seen or tasted before or since. Mr. Pa xton was really nice to we girls but he had some difficult boys to handl e and he really mopped the floor with them. Bumped their heads on the flo or. In those days kids didn’t get away with anything. There were thre e of my little friends that didn’t pass that year. I felt sorry for the m. Now I am in the fourth grade. This was the nicest and most enjoyabl e grade of all. Mrs. Maude Calison was my teacher. She read books to us a bout the Arabian Knights so many wonderful things. We girls drew paper do lls and cut them out and our teacher thought they were so good she hung t hem on the wall. Every week she put the names of those who never misse d a word in spelling. Mine was there every week. I was so proud. Grandm a helped me every night. She gave us a poem to learn and the one that di d it best got a prize. I won. Oh! I was so happy. My prize was a book o f poems. This is the poem we read:The Arab and His Steed My beautiful, M y beautiful! That standeth meekly by With proudly arch and glossy neck An d dark and fiery eye. Fret not to roam the desert now, With all the winge d speed I’m not to mount on thee again Thou art sold my desert steed Sl ow and weary I shall roam with weary feet alone Where with fleet step an d joyous bound Thou oft hath borne me on And sitting down at this green w ell I’ll pause and sadly think T’was here he bowed his glossy neck wh en last I saw him drink.When last I saw him drink? Away the fevered drea m is o’er I could not live a day and know that we should meet no more T hey tempted me my beautiful, for hungers power is strong They tempted m e my beautiful but I have loved too long Who said that I had given thee u p, whom said that thou were sold ‘Tis false, ‘tis false! My Arab stee d Fling them back their gold Thus I leap upon thy back to scour the dista nt plains Away who overtakes us now can claim thee for his pains By Carli n E Norton.Mrs. Calison gave a Christmas play with everyone in her clas s taking part. I sang a solo. Judea’s King T’was in Judea’s countr y fair, Within the manger lowly. The King was born in early morn, The wor lds redeemer holy. There came a star within the sky So runs the same ol d story And angels voices sang on high. The stars and all their glory.An d so in honor of the king We raise on high our branches And glad Hosanna s sweetly ring and all the world rejoicesA dream of Santa Clause. The be ginning of the play. The curtain rises and a mother (Aunt Emma Cluff) i s singing to her little boy (Wendle). Go to sleep my baby dear, Stars o n high are shining bright They o’er you a watch will keep through the c oming night. Then we all sing and come out from behind the wings singin g and swaying and swinging our arms. Lullaby, lullaby bye Lullaby, lulla by, bye Go to sleep my baby dear Mother sings lullaby. Lullaby, byeWe ar e all dressed in white dresses and stockings, the boys white pants and st ockings. Then the little boy dreams he is going away in an airship to s ee Santa Claus. Then there is Santa land with trees covered with snow. Ea ch child is a tree. Then we go into Santa’s home. There are the elves a nd reindeer, The Elves and fairies are all helping Santa. Then after the y have all …….Santa they all --- {Page cut off} and sing this son g We’re going back in our airship to tell our sojurn To the happy hom e of Santa where someday we’ll return To the happy home of Santa wher e someday we’ll returnThen mother puts the little boy to bed and Sant a comes with the reindeer and bring presents and fill his stockings. He a wakens in the morning and rubs his eyes and says, “ Oh Mama, I went t o the home of Santa Clause. I didn’t dream it did I? Then we all sang t his song. The trees are green and leafless, Jack Frost rides through th e air. The wind sweeps from the mountain O’er mead and meadows bare Bu t in our hearts is glowing the warmth of summertime The bells ring swee t the story Dear Santa comes they chime Santa, Dear Santa, the children†™s friend No matter what nation or name. From east to west from pole to p ole Dear Santa loves all the same Dear Santa loves all the same There wer e some other songs, Alice Kimball and Anna Pace sang a song. They ha d a tableau, when all the children were on stage. It was so beautiful, Th e children all marched around in rhythm. I had to march with Jimmie Stins on. My cousins Zilla Cluff and Wilda Moody pointed their fingers at me an d laughed, I put my hand over my mouth to keep from laughing. Someone i n the audience said isn’t that beautiful, When they lit the powder fo r the tableau, one little lady started running up the stairs to the stag e calling, “Annie! my Annie! the house is on fire!” Everyone laughe d and someone stopped her and told her what it was. They almost had to kn ock her in the head to make her sit down. That was the funny part of it . Aunt Emma Cluff was President of the Primary. She loved to put on play s. She had no sooner finished one then she started another. We loved them , Me especially. Everyone she put on, I had a part besides I always I al ways sang a solo or duet in between scenes. One evening Aunt Susie invit ed Grandma to a party or Home evening. When they had a party, it was a pa rty! Elizabeth played the piano so beautifully. Then she and Reba got t o dancing. They had a large round table. One would jump upon it and d o a little dance then the other. I was about 8 or 9 yrs so I jumped up o n the table and started doing a jig. Every mouth was wide open. They sai d “We didn’t know you could dance!” I said “I didn’t either† Aunt Emma was there and she said I’m going to have you dance in my s hows and she did. She had her boy Chester and I sing a song and this i s it: Just We Two (Girl) Would you know how first I met him bold light h earted free Through the fields with clover scattered came he first to m e Midst the blossoms there I thought him All on earth divine And with th e falling of the shadows my heart was no more mine (Chorus) Just we tw o, no Papa around, no mama near. Just we two with no one there to interfe re. Just the bluebells at our feet heard the whispered love words swee t Joy, Love, bliss complete only just we two. (Boy) Would you know how fi rst I met her Shy and simply sweet Picking poppies that were growing, j ust beneath her feet. Midst the blossoms there I thought her quite a dre am complete And with the tinkle of the blue bells My heart began to beat . Then when we had finished, He stepped back, Elizabeth Claridge went int o a tune called the “Irish Washa Woman” and I went into my dance whil e he clapped. When I finished I threw the audience a kiss and bowed myse lf out and hid behind the wings. The audience clapped and clapped and cla pped. Finally Aunt Emma found me and said you’ve got to go out there a nd do that dance again, which I did. At first I was scared, but when I s aw the faces of the people smiling at me, I smiled back. They clapped m e back the third time. I guess I looked kind of cute, my hair was in rin glets to way below my waist. Whenever I went to town, everyone I met wou ld hug me and say there’s the little dancer. I had so many wonderful th ings happen to me. Another song I sang in another play was this.I’m th e merriest girl that’s out. With laughter and good humor, Girls I pas s my time away And while I’m here I’ll do my best to please you wit h my day Come along and join with me and raise a merry shout Perhaps I a m and always was the merriest girl that’s out. Chorus: Now then youn g girls don’t be melancholy Just see like me if you can’t be jolly. I f my beau goes back on me I never sulk nor pout It pleases him and it do n’t hurt me for I’m the merriest girl that’s out. To balls and pa rties I go out for dancing and admire And waltzing is the thing I lov e of which I never tire. Come along and join with me and raise a merr y shout Perhaps I am and always was the merriest girl that’s out.The n they always had me go into my dance.The summer after that my Aunt Laur a Fitzpatrick came to see Grandma (She was Uncle Henry Moody’s wife bu t he died with typhoid fever and the little Paloma died soon after) Aun t Laura had another baby after she married William Fitzpatrick, whose nam e was Helen. I always loved babies, so I held that baby nearly all the ti me she was there. Aunt Laura said; ”I would like for you to come and s tay with me.” “Oh! Could I Grandma?” “You’ll have to ask you r Papa,” she said. So away I ran to meet Papa who was just coming home . I told him what Aunt Laura had said. “Can I, Papa?” He said, “I⠀™ll see”. I said ”Si” means yes! So away I ran to tell Aunt Laur a I could go. When we got off the train, Aunt Laura’s husband met he r and took the baby and the suitcase. I was carrying mine. I tugged at Au nt Laura’s dress and said, “He doesn’t know I’m here?” She sai d, ”Oh, excuse me, Fitz, this is my little niece Lizzie Moody,” He sa id, “Well isn’t that nice. I love little girls.” From that momen t I loved him. He was always so sweet to me. The next day a man by the na me of Tony Neary came to see Aunt Laura. He used to board at her place , when she had the Moody boarding house before she married. He looked a t me and said, “What have we here? Who’s this?’ Aunt Laura says, ⠀œIt’s my little niece Lizzie Moody.” He looked at me with those blu e eyes and bushy red eyebrows and said, “Well another Mormon come to to wn”. I answered indignantly, ”I’d rather be a Mormon than an old re d-haired Irishman like you.” I never saw anyone laugh like he did. Fro m then on we were good friends. Every time he came he would give me a dim e. Aunt Laura had two roomers and they would give me dimes every day o r two. I guess they didn’t get to see little girls very often. I was al ways so happy and friendly to everyone. Aunt Laura gave me some jelly gl asses to take home, so I filled one of them full, of the dimes the men ha d given me. One of her friends, Ora Zumont gave me dimes and one night s he took me to the show, she and her boyfriend. It was not a movie show i t was the silent pictures. I enjoyed it very much and I thought how nic e it was to pay so much attention to a little girl. One day Aunt Laura s aid, ”Lizzie, do you think you could tend the baby while I go shopping? ” “Oh yes,” I said. So I did. And when she came back all loaded dow n with bundles, She bought material for five dresses for me. She later to ok me and bought two pair of shoes and a beautiful hat. It was a beautifu l lacey straw with large daisies and lilies of the valley. She bought mor e chiffon and ribbons to put on it. I had six pair of stockings. She sai d, “Lizzie , how do you want your dress made?” I said,” Make it pla in, because Grandma and Papa delight in plainness.” Well, she frille d that dress with lace and insertion and ribbons. She bought beautiful b lue ribbons for my sash and hair. Then red and pink ribbons for every day . Well, I never had such fancy clothes in my life and never so many . I was really a Cinderella. Every day she would send me to the little s tore to buy candy and nuts. She always had fruit cake and fruit on the ta ble. She wanted me to stay with her and live with her and be her little g irl. She said she would give me music lessons and dancing lessons, But Pa pa said no. He wanted to keep us all together. Our little sister was livi ng with my Aunt Katurah in Old Mexico. She was the little baby when Mam a died and Aunt had no children, so he let her take the baby to raise. S he stayed there until she was nine years old when the Saints were run ou t of Mexico. [1912] I used to pray for the Lord to bring my littler siste r home and he did. Well, I stayed at Aunt Laura’s for two months. I l oved every minute of it. She was so good to me. One dumb thing I did whe n I was there was this. She sent me to the store to get some cards to sen d home to my folks. Like I said I always like babies so here I come hom e with cards saying the arrival of a baby. It said when arrived. I though t it meant when I arrived in Globe. When Fitz came home and saw the cards , he said, “Well , what do we have here? Laura why didn’t you tell me ?” They both laughed and she explained it all to me later. I exchange d them. I learned a crazy song from her phonograph. One of those with di scs and a horn looked like a morningglory flower.One rainy day my wife an d I Went down the street a shopping We saw a lot of pretty girls The rai n was fastly dropping To keep their dresses from the mud They kept them u p quite high And when my wife said, Bob come on You ought to of heard m e cry, Never, never, Oh, I could see them big fat legs forever Once my w ife’s mother came to stay a week oh, brother She stayed a week and tha t was one week longer than the other. And when was time for her to go M y wife she cried and cried. To have you go and leave me so My heart withi n replied Ever, ever I hope she goes and stays away forever.A crazy son g for a, little girl to learn. No wonder all the men in town had me sin g it over and would they laugh, In those days it was something to see a w oman’s ankles. But now it’s something else. While I was in Globe, w e lived not too far from the smelter. I could sit in the window and watc h them dump the slag. T’was melted rock. They poured it out of big iro n cars at night, it was really beautiful to see that hot melted rock pou r down the hill. They took me through the smelter and told me how they se parated the real copper from the rock which was called ore. That was real ly something, that trip to Aunt Laura’s in Globe. Even the ride on th e train was something else. I had never done that before. There were thre e little neighbor girls living with their father. They were French. One w as named Mary, one Victorine, one Annie. he called them in to supper on e evening and I went with them. He broke off a chunk of French bread an d gave them each a tiny glass of wine. That was their supper. He offere d me some but I told him I already had my supper.. When I went home we al ways had bread and milk. I guess that would have been strange to them. W e had a large grape vineyard at home, but we never thought of making win e out of them. I was going home on the train; who should I see but my fr iends. Their father was taking them to a Catholic convent. Little Annie w as carsick. I thought what if our father had sent us away to a convent in stead of taking care of us himself? If it hadn’t been for Grandma, I do n’t know what we would have done. When Rulon was about five and I was e ight or younger we were coming home from town when it began to thunder an d lightning then suddenly it just poured down. We lived a mile from town . No place to go to get out of the rain so we ran as fast as we could, bu t by the time we reached home we were soaked through. When we got there , we called and called, ”Papa, Papa,” but no answer, so we went ove r to Aunt Lula’s and knocked on the door. She opened the door and said , “Oh, you children go home and get some dry clothes on.” Well, we we nt home and I said, ”It won’t do us any good to go back over there, b ecause our clothes will be just as wet as before.” So we changed into o ur nightgowns, and pulled down the blinds and crawled into bed and covere d our heads to keep out the sound of the thunder. Rulon began to cry s o I said, “Don’t cry honey, let’s kneel down and ask the Lord to br ing Papa home. So we got back into bed, when we heard Papa scraping his f eet on the porch. We jumped out of bed and threw our arms around Papa an d said, ”Papa, the Lord brought you to us.” He said, ”I was standi ng on the porch of the meat market wondering what to do. Because I was af raid you little children would be home alone, when Brother Bigler came b y in a buggy. I ask him for a ride and here I am.” And were we ever gla d to see him. You children, who have mothers and fathers to come home to , really should appreciate them. You just don’t know what it is to no t have a mother. Papa built a fire in the fireplace and took us on his la p and started to sing. We always joined in. He always sang when anythin g was wrong. He was the best Papa in the world. Everybody in (town) sai d he was one in a million. Here is a little song we used to sing. Glenn a played the organ and taught this song.Two little children, a boy an d a girl, Sat by an old church door. Two little children, a boy and a gir l, Sat by an old church door. Their poor little feet were as brown as th e curls That fell and the dress she wore. The boys hat was tattered and t orn were his shoes A tear fell in each little eye Why don’t you go hom e to your mama she said? And this was the maiden’s reply.Chorus M ama’s in heaven, they took her away. Left Jim and I alone. We came her e to sleep, at the close of the day for we have no mama nor home. We can ’t earn our bread, we’re too little she said, Jim’s five years an d I’m only seven There’s no one to love us since Papa is dead and ou r darling mama’s in heaven.I can’t remember the other verse but I kno w it told how the woman took them home to live with her.We sure learned s ome sad songs in those days. They just kind of fit us, I guess. Linda cam e back from Mexico when she was nine. She was a cute little thing. We lo ved her, but sometimes teased her too much. I gave her all my dolls and s dishes. I was fifteen then and had outgrown all those things. She was s upposed to live with Aunt Katurah but she liked to be with us. She hadn⠀™t had brothers and sisters before so she spent most of her time with us . Besides there were Aunt Lula Layton’s children to play with. They li ved just across the street. When I was just in the fourth grade Grandma s ent me with a little wagon to get some chicken feed from Papa. It was ear ly in the morning before school. I had to go a mile. I ran as fast as I c ould pull the wagon. Papa put a hundred-pound sack of grain in the wagon . I pulled it as fast as I could back to Grandma’s. I was really huffin g and puffing when I got back to Grandma’s Well, when I got back it wa s almost time for school. Aunt Suzie came to the door. I said, “I’m n ot going to school. I’ll be late and I haven’t been late this year.† She said go on you’ll make it and so I ran as hard as fast as I coul d. I had to go several blocks, When I reached the corner from the schoo l of the fence across the street; I could see the class lined up and th e teacher standing there. They all turned around and yelled “Hurry Liz zie! You’ll make it.” And you know my teacher held up the class unti l I got there. Wasn’t that sweet of her? I was all out of breath, so sh e had one of the boys go out to the pump and get me a drink. Everybody wa s always so good to me. When I got home to grandma’s for lunch, my sist er Ida had a baby girl. That’s why they sent me after the chicken feed , and why Aunt Suzie was there so early in the morning. That was Mildred .Fifth Grade. When I was in the fifth grade Miss Dolly Sutton was my teac her. She was lots of fun. She read books for us each morning for ten or f ifteen minutes. Like “Tom Sawyer” and the “Call of the Wild,” Sh e wore her dresses long and flat heels on her shoes. I guess her feet wer e quite long. One of the boys said she sent him to the shoemaker to get h er shoes fixed and he came back and said, “He said he didn’t mend row boats.” They used to go behind her and measure her footprints. She wa s so good natured we loved her. She gave readings one about ‘He Was Th ere and So Was I’ It was so cute about a little boy watching his siste r make love. That’s the way Rulon and I did. June and Don. One night D on brought her a large box of candy, and they had it on the end of the po rch, they were so engrossed in each other they didn’t see us take the b ox of around the corner of the house and we each took a few pieces then w e quietly slipped it back. I guess Don wondered how June could eat so muc h candy. I was beginning to notice the boys about this time. There wa s a little boy in my class names Leon McDonald. I thought he was so cute . He used to clamp my braids down in the ink well (of course, there wa s no ink in it). He had a turned-up nose and I would turn around in my se at and push my nose up at him. One day I had my hair in curls and a bunc h of boys held me and cut off one of my curls. My teacher sure got afte r them and Grandma didn’t like it either because it took a long time fo r it to grow out so it could be braided in. I didn’t care, I was just g lad that they would pay that much attention to me. One day we girls wer e playing Jack’s out on the lawn at recess. One of the boys kept teasin g us, by putting grass down the back of our necks. Anna Reneer got up an d took him down and sat on him and filled his mouth with grass. He didn†™t bother us any more. June gave me a party. There came this little boy W ayne Skousen, he held my hand. I thought he was cute.Sixth Grade. In th e sixth grade we had a Mr. Beauregard for a teacher. He was nice, only wh en he seated each one he put me in B class, I had always been in A clas s before, and I told him about it. He said that remains to be seen. So i t went that way for a month until we had our monthly exams. I got a 100 % on all of them so he said Lizzie you really do belong in “A” class . So I was back where I belonged. I sat with Anna Reneer. She was a rea l tomboy. One morning she came in with her hand in her pocket and she whi spered to me “Take your pencils out of that box and open it up carefull y. I’ve got a mouse and don’t you dare let him loose.” I tried to p ut the lid down quickly but it wasn’t quick enough, The mouse got away . Some of the girls began to scream A mouse, a mouse! There was really co mmotion around there for a while girls climbing upon there seats, the boy s laughing. Anna trying to catch the poor little scared mouse. She finall y caught it, but he teacher made her take it outside. She had a string ar ound its tail so she just tied it up until recess, but one of the boys go t it, and she threw rocks at him until he let it go. One day we were hav ing sewing class and Anna just unceremoniously picked up a bottle of in k and poured it down Alice Kimball’s neck. She was expelled for that, f or a while at least. Another time she was sent outside and saw someone’ s horse and saddle tied up to a field. She got on it and rode around unti l recess. We had picnics at Cluff’s Ranch. We rode on a hayrack. The y covered the wagon with straw then spread a large canvas tarp over it. I t was pulled by two horses It was about ten miles out there and we sat wi th our feet hanging off and dangling and singing all the way. There wer e large cottonwood trees, always a large swing. We each took our lunch. I t was so much fun climbing up the hills and the little pug nosed boy woul d take my hand and help me up the hill. I could have run up it but I like d the attention he gave me. We had a party and they had me sing. I sang F unny Little Freckles Next door to me there lives a boy who has a funny sm ile I’ve only known this little boy, For just a little while. But yeste rday he kissed me through the pickets in the fence Although he’s funn y looking it just made me feel immense One night we stood and talked toge ther at the garden gate It’s funny but I didn’t know that it was gett ing late. But when I heard my mama call, It gave me such a scare, I grabb ed him round his funny neck and kissed him then and there. Chorus: He ha s funny little freckles on his funny little nose and he’s funny looki n even when he wears his Sunday clothesBut when he holds my hand in his I ’m happy as can be. And I wonder if this funny little boys loves me . I don’t know whats the matter but I have a funny way of thinking of t his little boy all through the live long dayHe’s scratched my name on f ences And he’s carved it on a tree It’s on his reader, spelling boo k and big geography Last night he didn’t come to me at the garden gate , Although I waited patiently ‘til quarter after eight. And when I ha d to go to bed I just laid down and cried I dreamed he was a fairy prince , and I his fairy bride.This certain little boy always blushed when I san g this song.Seventh Grade Mr. Henry Mathews was our teacher. He was real ly nice to me. When I took Palmer Method Penmanship he would come by eac h of us to see how we were doing and he always patted my arm. When ever t he class wanted to go on a picnic they would say, Lizzie you ask him, he⠀™ll let you do anything. One day I was in the hall at noon, one of the g irls was playing the organ, I was dancing funny, but I didn’t know my t eacher was standing in the door looking at me. I squealed and ran. One e vening after school he asked me to stay after school. Gee! I was scared , I didn’t know what I had done. He went on correcting papers. Not eve n looking up, finally I asked why he was keeping me. He said “Oh! jus t to keep me company and if you will sing Funny Little Freckles to me yo u may go. “ “If that’s all you want then I’m going home,” I ra n out the door. He just laughed at me. On April Fool’s Day some of th e kids suggested we all run away to the river and play hooky. Well they f inally got all the seventh and eighth grades to but three girls. Ruth Ten ny, Myrtle Cole, and Anna Pace. Well, the teacher let them go home, bu t we had so much fun wading in the river. Of course we took our lunch. W e didn’t get back until after five o’clock, so we went by his hotel w here he was staying and serenaded him. He came out on the balcony and app lauded us. When we went to school next day, he greeted us with a smile, t hen he asked me to come to his desk and he handed me the foolscap paper t o pass around. he said, “Everyone put away your books and be ready fo r a stiff examination, those who don’t pass will not be promoted.” W e were really scared until he gave us the questions. They were so simpl e I think that a fourth grader could have answered them. Were we ever rel ieved. But we didn’t try it again. At the end of school, he gave us a b anquet at the hotel. He didn’t teach us the next year. Anna Pace sa t with me in the seventh grade. She sat with me most of the grade whe n I was in the B class in the sixth grade I sat with a girl I won’t sa y her name because someone might know who I am talking about. She copie d all my lessons, even my drawings. She would ask me to let her look at t hem, then she would trace them and just ruin mine. I was so glad when m y teacher put me in ‘A’ class. Although Anna Reneer was a tomboy an d did such thoughtless things, I liked her. I felt sorry for her becaus e she had no mother and had lived with her father in Texas on a cattle ra nch, where she had had her own way, then he had died and she had to com e to Thatcher, Arizona and live with her brother.Eighth Grade When I wa s in the eighth grade I was sick a lot. Papa was sick and had to go to th e hospital in California to be operated on for cancer. We were so worrie d about him. I got real sick. I never knew what was the matter, but I kno w now that I had low sugar and not having the proper diet I would pass ou t. we called it fainting spells. But I managed to get through the eight h grade and graduate. We had a beautiful graduation class and exercises . One reason was that Della Bingham and I sang a duet. Glenna and June go t married that year. Glenna in the spring and June in the fall. That lef t me as the head of the house. No, I got that wro

    4. [S3] 1880 United States Federal Census.

    5. [S5] 1930 United States Federal Census, Year: 1930; Census Place: Gilbert, Maricopa, Arizona; Roll: 59; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 0071; Image: 278.0; FHL microfilm: 2339794.

    6. [S6] U.S. City Directories (Beta).

    7. [S11] 1940 United States Federal Census, Year: 1940; Census Place: Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona; Roll: T627_106; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 7-68B.

    8. [S12] 1910 United States Federal Census, Year: 1910; Census Place: Thatcher, Graham, Arizona; Roll: T624_39; Page: 30B; Enumeration District: 0047; FHL microfilm: 1374052.