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Jonathan Taylor PACKER

Jonathan Taylor PACKER

Male 1817 - 1889  (71 years)

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  • Name Jonathan Taylor PACKER 
    Born 26 Jul 1817  Perry Township, Richland, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Initiatory (LDS) 29 Jan 1846 
    Immigration 1848  Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _FSFTID MLN8-9RC 
    _UID 5D6F91491F7FCE4686D601E01EFE5FAEBEAD 
    Died 26 Jan 1889  Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 31 Jan 1889  Safford Cemetery, Safford, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I89  pember-crandall
    Last Modified 28 Jan 2017 

    Father Moses PACKER,   b. 1764, Uwchlan, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Sep 1830, Middlebury, Logan, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Mother Eve WILLIAMS,   b. 1768, , Fayette, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1830, Middlebury, logan, OH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 1791 
    _UID E88AF94664B11342B4DCA4AD4230E0D62428 
    Family ID F128  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Sarah EWELL,   b. 25 Jul 1814, Richfield, Albemarle, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jun 1839, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 24 years) 
    Married 14 May 1837  , Ray, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID A5ECC9570ACBD442BE695EC00A7BEDDE316C 
    Children 
     1. Nephi Ewell PACKER,   b. 27 Aug 1838, Ray, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1906, Layton (now Safford), Graham, Arizona Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F129  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Angelina Avilda CHAMPLIN,   b. 8 Jan 1820, Hartland, Windsor, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1893, Colonia Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 1840  Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 5484D6551DD5744CB4D214A4EF6569E79766 
    Children 
     1. Alonzo Hamilton PACKER,   b. 14 Apr 1841, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Mar 1917, Safford, Graham, Az Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     2. Lorenzo James PACKER,   b. 27 Jul 1843, Nauvoo, Hancock, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1849, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 5 years)
     3. Sarah Elizabeth PACKER,   b. 19 Oct 1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Dec 1846, , Hancock, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     4. Caroline PACKER,   b. 1845, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1860  (Age < 14 years)
     5. William Jefferson PACKER,   b. 26 Oct 1848, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1905, Safford, Graham, Az Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     6. Pleasant Deseret PACKER,   b. 21 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Nov 1875, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Territory, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 24 years)
     7. Mary Angeline PACKER,   b. 9 Sep 1852, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1906, Chesterfield, Bannock, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     8. Avilda Verona PACKER,   b. 25 Sep 1855, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1858, Salem, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     9. LeVerna Sonora PACKER,   b. 19 Apr 1858, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1926, Pima, Graham, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     10. Eva Ellen PACKER,   b. 30 Sep 1860, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. Apr 1862, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 1 years)
     11. Pleasant Deseret PACKER,   b. 21 Feb 1851, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Nov 1871, Brigham City, Box Elder, UT Find all individuals with events at this location
     12. Eva Ellen PACKER,   b. 30 Sep 1860, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1862, Brigham City, Box Elder, UT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F64  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Marie Laverna CHAMPLIN,   b. 1816, Hartland, Windsor, VT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Feb 1852  (Age 36 years) 
    Married 16 Feb 1852 
    _UID 182139585418F4409A6564D2C0A981A52E6C 
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F130  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Christiane Petrine SUNDBY,   b. 11 Dec 1825, Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1892, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Married 13 Dec 1857  Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Ut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 2445DAB569E8344C97BE190F0620F645A774 
    Children 
     1. Joseph Alma PACKER,   b. 13 Jan 1859, Fort Sherman, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1941, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     2. Helgar Jacob PACKER,   b. 6 Apr 1861, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Aug 1930, Logan, Cache, Ut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     3. Amasa Lyman PACKER,   b. 16 Feb 1864, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Mar 1864  (Age 0 years)
     4. Amos Erastus PACKER,   b. 24 Dec 1865, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Mar 1940, Pima, Graham, Arizona, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     5. Martha Marie PACKER,   b. 30 Mar 1869, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Dec 1962, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F131  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Helen LINQUEST 
    Married 1872 
    _UID 62C9641DF484FB45B94B79BE4147E64F5C84 
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F132  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Helen LINDQUIST 
    Married 2 Sep 1872  Salt Lake City, , UT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 9B93BDD94C05EC44B1838A67D5F2A157292A 
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2017 17:05:48 
    Family ID F133  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • JONATHAN TAYLOR PACKER
      Jonathan Taylor Packer, son of Moses and Eve (Williams) Packer,was b orn Perry Township, Richland County, Ohio on the 26th of July 1817. Jonat han was the youngest of twelve children. Very little information is foun d relative to Jonathan's boyhood. From stories told by his grandchildre n we learn that he worked as a tanner with his father, Moses, during youn ger years.
      Jonathan joined the Mormon Church and was baptized on the 10th of Ma rch 1836 by Elder Jacob Myers. Two of his brothers also joined the Churc h -- Nathan Williams in December 1833, and William Hamilton, November 185 0. At the time Jonathan joined the Church, it had established headquarter s in Kirtland, Ohio, just twenty-five miles from his home. The Church ha d received a lot of publicity and had taken great strides in conversion s and development. In fact, the popularity of the Church had created suc h commotion among the different religious sects that jealousy and ill fee ling soon developed into persecution. Because of this, the authorities de cided to re-establish the Church headquarters in Jackson County, Missouri . Jonathan joined the Saints migrating to Missouri just two months afte r joining the Church. In the history that he wrote he states that he too k a fine Arabian mare wlth him on this journey. He let Colonel George Hin kle ride his mare while he walked those eight hundred miles. These mile s led the Saints over a wild and desolate prairie, trackless and withou t habitation, save for an occasional hunter.
      When Jonathan arrived in Missouri, the Saints were again on the move ; the people of Jackson County fearing the domination of the Mormons in t heir community forced them on. At first the people established themselve s chiefly along Shoal Creek, a tributary of the Grand River. They then pu shed out into different parts of Caldwell County in Missouri. Meantim e a steady stream of immigrants poured into upper Missouri, till many Eas tern and Canadian towns were emptied of their Mormon population. In a sho rt time, about fifteen thousand Saints had settled the region. They bough t land, they harvested crops, they built private and public houses and th ey looked forward hopefully to a period of peace and prosperity.
      Jonathan was among the Saints who were driven out of Jackson County . It was in this area that he met and married Sarah Ewell, about 1837. Th eir only child was born on the 27th of August 1838 in Ray County, Missour i. They named his Nephi a£ter the Book of Mormon character. This expresse d their devotion toward their Church. Their faith was demonstrated many t imes by their great desire to establish their Church in the face of starv ation and death.
      By the end of the 1838, things went from bad to worse. Mobs were org anized and determined to drive the Mormons, who were anti-slavery, out o f Missouri. Governor Boggs of Missouri offered no aid or protection for t he Mormon people. We find Jonathan at Crooked River where a savage battl e took place. Under Captain Patten the Mormons charged the mobsters, wh o had sought to attack them, and immediately came to contact with them wi th swords and gun fire. The mob was soon put to flight. Captain Fatten, o f the quorum of the twelve, was mortally wounded. Jonathan brought with h im his journey across the plains a sword which was used in the Battle o f Crooked River. This sword is at present in the possession of Lillian Mi llett.
      Just six days after the Battle of Crooked River the treacherous bloo dy battle at Hauns Mill took place. This was a settlement of about thirt y families on Shoal Creek about sixteen miles east of Far West in Caldwel l County. This incident in Mormon history is introduced at this point bec ause of Angeline Avilda, commonly called Avilda, one of the daughters Wil liam and Mary Champlin who were living there. The Saints had just signe d a treaty of peace with a state militia officer without knowing the reas on why they should be called on to enter into such an agreement. However , in the treaty they had been promised protection if they would lay dow n their arms, which they did.
      The following day, on the 30th of October, 1838, they were attacke d by more than 200 armed men. Confusion reigned among the Mormons. Some o f them ran into a log house used as a blacksmith shop while others fled i nto the thicket near the mill stream for protection. William joined a gro up of men who barricaded themselves in that blacksmith shop for refuge. T he cracks between the logs of the shop were so wide that the fiends on th e outside could see their victims within. Surrounding the place, they pou red volley after volley through the cracks with deadly effect. William es caped with his life when a Brother Richards fell over him dead. With hi s blood splattered over his body he feigned death. From that day on the y affectionally called him "possum" Champlin.
      The Champlin family who had just come in from the carrot field wit h their harvest, ran to a thicket. As they were running a bullet pierce d Avilda's skirt and sleeve but she was unhurt. They hid in the branche s of an old oak tree and prayed aloud for deliverance. As soon as they ha d finished their prayers, two chipmunks appeared and ran in a circle arou nd the tree where they were hiding. This they considered as an omen tha t their prayers had been heard and would be answered. Avilda, became th e second wife of Jonathan Taylor Packer just two years after this inciden t.
      Such dastardly and savage massacres as these, and many others were u ndoubtedly touched off by the famous extermination order of Governor Bogg s. "The Mormons," he said, "must be treated as enemies and must be exterm inated or driven from the state!"
      Nothing exhibits better the marvelous recuperative powers of Mormoni sm than the manner is which it flourished in Illinois. Stripped and peele d when they entered that state, these Latter-day Saints almost immediatel y sprang up into a community on the banks of the Mississippi the like o f which was not to be found in western America. Jonathan with his good wi fe Sarah and their infant son, Nephi, were with this group. They stayed w ith the Saints for a short time in Quincy. Our history tells of a small s tove owned by Alonzo Packer which bore the trade mark of "Quincy, Illinoi s." Alonzo called attention to the fact that they once lived there.
      During the expulsion of the Mormons, on the last day of October, 183 8, The Prophet was visited by Colonel George M. Hinkle. It was this Colon el that Jonathan had loaned his fine Arabian mare to ride while he walke d from Kirtland, Ohio, to Jackson County, Missouri. Hinkle was at this ti me in command of the Mormon forces at Far West.
      "President Smith," said Colonel Hinkle, as he came into the room, "o ne of the peace terms is that you, Sidney Rigdom, Parley P. Pratt, Lyma n Wight, and George W. Robinson shall give yourselves up as prisoners o f war, the understanding being that you will be released just as soon a s things can be arranged."
      The five persons named went with him. But they soon found that the y had been betrayed by the Colonel who had delivered them up for trial an d punishment as common violaters of law. Jonathan's friend, the Colonel , turned
      traitor to his friends and the Church.
      When the Prophet Joseph Smith was released from prison, his arriva l in Quincy cheered the Saints. Obviously he turned that imprisonment t o a good account, for it was here that he conceived the idea of Commerc e as a likely spot for the Saints to settle. Commerce was so unhealthfu l that very few people could or would live there. However, he knew that t he place would become a healthful spot by the blessings of heaven to th e Saints. then too, no more eligible place presented itself.
      As they arrived on the new townsite, they fell sick of the Malaria f ever. Jonathan and Sarah were among those Saints. Sarah with her infant s on had endured the many hardships, but her physical strength had become s o weakened during those days of trials, that she died on the lst of Jul y 1839 in Nauvoo.
      In fact, So many of the Saints were sick and dying that the prophe t felt that something (must) be done. On the morning of July 22nd, 1839 h e rose to find himself endowed with a high degree of spiritual power. H e and his counselors set out to heal the sick. Many testimonies were gain ed through that administration. As the Prophet busied himself healing th e sick, a stranger came up to him and begged him to come to his home an d heal his sick babies. Joseph hesitated a moment, then said to Wilford W oodruff: "You go with the man. Take this handkerchief and wipe the face s of the children as you administer to them, and they will be healed." Wo odruff says that he did as directed with the desired result. The handkerc hief, a red silk, is still in the Woodruff family treasure chest. This ma ss healing was performed just 22 days after the death of Sarah.
      With the Saints Jonathan went to work again to build a home, but thi s time without his good wife, Sarah, and with the responsibilities of lit tle Nephi, his Son. He helped to drain the boggy land of Commerce where t hey were forced to fight disease, pests, starvation and even death, if th ey were to survive. He built a home for himself of red brick. He later i n life remarked that this was the best home that he had ever owned. Cla y for the brick was in a natural form on the banks of the Mississippi Riv er and didn't require a kiln treatment. Many of these red brick homes sti ll stand as a reminder of the industry and spirit of the Saints while i n Nauvoo.
      Jonathan was lone some and felt the need for a companion to assist h im in rearing his son, Nephi. The following year, he married Angeline Avi lda Champlin. Avilda, as she was called, was born in Windsor County, Verm ont, January 8th, 1820. She was that little girl, along with her parent s and family who survived the Haun's Mill Massacre.
      Jonathan and Avilda began life together in that little red brick hom e, a place they felt secure from those who sought to drive them away. Com merce was changed that year into a thriving community which was destine d to become the largest city in Illinois in a few short years. The name w as changed by the Saints to Nauvoo, meaning "How Beautiful!" The same yea r that Jonathan was married, was a presidential year. Nauvoo was given on e of the most liberal charters ever granted any city. This charter was th e result of political pressure in interest of influence in obtaining th e Mormon vote.
      Under the able direction of the Prophet the Saints began the job o f building the beautiful Nauvoo temple on the banks of the Mississippi. J onathan assisted the Church members in erecting that beautiful edifice. T he next few years of Jonathan and Avilda's lives were happy, progressiv e and peaceful. They had the privilege of watching the city of Nauvoo gro w from the old log trading post along the Mississippi to a thriving metro polis. Their happiness was enhanced by the birth of three of their childr en in Nauvoo. Alonzo was born on the 14th of April 1841; Lorenzo James wa s born on the 27th of July 1843. and Sarah Elizabeth the 19th of Octobe r 1845.
      As the town of Nauvoo blossomed in popularity and beauty, the mob sp irit and jealousy began to rise. The Saints who had worked so hard fo r a home and a chance to build a city began to feel the mob tension and i nsecurity again filled their hearts. Jonathan and Avilda gathered their c hildren about them and through prayer and work were able to keep their ho me going. During the year of 1844 their leader and Prophet was murdered b y the mob. His untimely death brought sadness and apprehensions into th e hearts of the faithful. In the little town of Nauvoo where Jonathan an d Avilda dwelt they heard the distressing news. Within that city we are t old that the watch dogs howled mournfully as if they of the city's founde rs were the prized burdens wrapped in buffalo robes that the lumbering wa gons had borne that day to the City of the Saints. Throughout the city th e cattle in barnyards bellowed through the night, their mournful calls ma gnifying the sorrow of the sleepless Saints.
      Brigham Young was chosen the new president of the Church. Under hi s leaderShip the Saints worked feverishly to finish the Nauvoo temple. O n December l0th, 1845, the temple was opened for endowments. Mobs force d its closing February 7th 1846. During those two months, however, abou t 2,000 saints received their endowments. Jonatnan and Avilda were amon g the faithful who were privileged to receive their endowments on the 6t h of February 1846, just the day before it was closed.
      Life was uncertain from then on in Nauvoo. Brigham Young and the Saints w ere busy preparing for the great exodus. Jonathan and Avilda knew that th e time was at hand when they would have to again give up the home they ha d worked so hard to obtain. Jonathan's time was consumed building a wago n and disposing of the property to the best advantage possible. Avilda wa s busy deciding issues, sorting clothes and packing necessities. One stor y of these necessities handed down to us is the story of a bag of potat o eyes which Avilda had very carefully cut from her potatoes to take wit h them for seed. During their long journey, the eyes became as hard as ro cks, but to their great astonishment they grew into fine potatoes when pl anted in the great Salt Lake Valley.
      During those days, the solemn silence of the night was broken only b y the clang of the tools of industry preparing a way for the people to le ave. The secret exodus started in the dead of a cold winter-a master Stro ke by Brigham Young. Quietly the wagons rolled out of their dooryards loa ded with bedding and provisions in preparation to being drawn across th e Mississippi into the vast unknown. Jonathan had a yoke of oxen and a yo ke of cows. The cows furnished their milk which was a luxury everyone di d not enjoy. Even with two teams the load was heavy. It was necessary fo r the young to walk across the plains. Alonzo being seven years of age, w alked all the way from Winter Quarters to Salt Lake City. He later remark ed that the skin on his feet was so thick he could strike a spark on th e bottom by rubbing them.
      Jonathan and Avilda left with the David or Daniel Evans Company an d were among the first following Brigham Young. As their creaking wagon s disappeared over the rolling hills) their fate became a part of the sil ence of the prairies. Their only protection was unity, their meagre posse ssions) and supplies they could carry in their wagons. Jonathan did not h esitate in making up his mind. His courageous heart and unfaltering fait h drove him on to the West) a new home, on with the Saints that he loved.
      During the perilous journey Jonathan and Avilda were forced to sto p in Winter Quarters with the Saints. The United States government had fo llowed their trail and demanded 500 of their strongest men to help with t he war in Mexico. This So weakened their ranks that a winter encampment w as necessary. Due to exposure, improper food and drinking water, approxim ately six hundred people died that winter. Jonathan and Avilda lost thei r baby) Sarah Elizabeth on the 19th of October 1845. They baptized thei r oldest son, Nephi, son of Sarah and Jonathan in the Missouri River. Tr y to imagine the feeling of
      Jonathan and Avilda as they left Winter Quarters in 1848. After those win ters of hardship, their baby Elizebeth was buried on the cold bleak plain s of Nebraska. Their heads, though bowed with grief, were turned towar d a new home somewhere in the West. A home where they might worship God a ccording to their own desires.
      Jonathan and Avilda entered the great Salt Lake Valley on the 31st o f August 1848 about a year after Brigham Young had proclaimed, "It is eno ugh. This is the right place) drive on." They arrived 16 days ahead of th eir particular company. The trip, although hard, was made without furthe r incident. Avilda was expecting her fourth child. William was born whil e they lived in Pioneer Fort on the 26th of October 1848. He was the firs t white child born in that fort.
      Their hardships were not over. It was in May and June of that year ( 1848 that the crickets had devoured the tender leaves of grain and came s o near destroying the whole crop. At times the Saints were forced to liv e on thistles and sego roots. Though the Saints were horrified at the tho ught of starvation, they did not despair. When their deliverance did com e in the form of a great flock of white winged gulls, a great rejoicing w ent out and the hand of the Lord was recognized with gratitude. On Augus t the l0th, 1848, a special day of celebration, "The Harvest Feast", wa s set apart and observed. The crops had not been entirely destroyed. Wit h new companies arriving every few weeks the food Supply for the winter w as meager and must be rationed. Jonathan and Avilda arrived about three w eeks after the "Harvest Feast."
      Jonathan and Avilda set about doing one of the greatest tasks of th e pioneers, that of building, creating and tying together with churches , schools and homes, a new community. Jonathan built the first house in t he First Ward in Salt Lake City. It was during that same year (1849) tha t their little son, Lorenzo James, died. He was just six years of age.
      Their hearts were filled with gratitude for the place God had give n them to again build a home. Their faith in that which they were doing w as expressed many times. As each child reached baptismal age, that ordina nce was performed. Alonzo was baptized in Salt Lake City in 1849. Anothe r instance of their courage and faith was expressed that year when the Ch urch called for volunteers to explore the South. Jonathan was ready to he lp.
      Under the able leadership of Parley P. Pratt, Jonathan left that Win ter with a group of fifty men into the dreary and almost unknown region o f Southern Utah. During this exploring expedition they encountered sever e weather, deep snow, and many hardships and trials incident to such an u ndertaking. They explored the best portion of the country south from Grea t Salt Lake City to the mouth of the Santa Clara on the Rio Virgen, whic h is the principal branch of the Rio Colorado. Regarding this adventure , history states: "In much of this distance we made the first tracks; eve n the portion which had before been penetrated by wagons were so complete ly snowed under we seldom found the trail. "Their exploration took them t o Santa Clara Creek. After wallowing in the Snow and suffering from expos ure, this group arrived home February 7th, 1850--exhausted, but with a fi ne report of the country to the South.
      The next few years were hard for Jonathan and Avilda. They did not c ount their wealth in material things of life, but in the eternal rewards . During the year 1851, Pleasant Desseret was born. He was later affectio natly called, "Uncle Dez." On September 9th, 1852 Angeline Mary was born . They were still living in the Sugar House Ward. In 1855, Avilda Veron a was born. Avilda died just three years later in Salem, Utah. In 1860 Ev a was born in Brigham City. Eva died two years later, on April 16th, 186 2 in that same city.
      Jonathan accepted the doctrine of plural marriage as a law of God, a s did he accept all parts of the gospel. In accordance to this law he too k unto himself another wife, Christiana Sunby, in the year of 1857. (It m ight be stated here that about only 2% of the male population were permit ted to marry more than one wife, as a man had to meet required qualificat ions from the Church authorities.) Christiana was a little Mormon girl wh o had arrived in Salt Lake City with a company of immigrants from Denmar k in September 1857. She was a charming person with a most lovable person ality had a great desire in her heart to live the principles of the gospe l.
      The most unselfish Avilda shared with Christiana, her material wealt h that she and Jonathan had worked and sacrificed So much to obtain. Sure ly within Avilda's heart dwelled a possessive love of Jonathan. Through j oys and sorrows they had gained an eternal love for each other. Now Avild a was called upon to share not oqly her wealth, but her love with another . Adjustments had to be made, codes rebuilt,--yes, even personalities cha nged. But hadn't Avilda's life been one of sacrifice, one of re-adjustmen ts, one of courage and strength. It was a principle of the gospel, she co uld, and she would accept her new way of life.
      Through the years, Avilda learned to love Christiana with all her he art. Christiana's children were as Avilda's and visa versa. There was a s trong love, respect and devotion in the hearts of all the family.
      Let's picture for a moment, the setting So far built around Jonathan an d his wives. Salt Lake was now a thriving community, not all Mormon, fo r it was fast collecting the transient elements that was also moving west . Indians were a constant trouble, their friendship had to be cultivate d at all times.
      It was this year (1858), that Johnson's Army threatened to destroy t he Saints in Utah. Those men living in polygamy were forced to hid out o r be persecuted. These were the times that tried men's souls. It also tri ed their stability, their courage and their faith. It was in this year (1 858) on the 19th of April that Lavern Sonora was born to Avilda. Lavern w as born in a tent where her mother, Avilda, and Jonathan were camped. The y were then on their way to Mexico to escape the persecution dealt thos e living in polygamy. However, after a few weeks camp there, they change d their minds about going to Mexico and decided to turn back to their hom e in Brigham City.
      Jonathan then took Christiana and moved to Fort Herriman, west of Ri verton, Utah, where their first son, Joseph Alma, was born. (Joseph: ha d a son Ira who is the father of Boyd Packer who was sustained as an assi stant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles at the General Conference of t he Church in Salt Lake on October 1, 1961.) Later Jonathan and Christian a joined Avilda in Brigham City where they built homes nearby where the f amilies could associate together. Later to Christiana was born these chil dren: 1861 on April 6th, Helger; 16 February 1864, Amasa, Lyman was born ; 24 December 1865 Amos was born and on 30 March 1869 Martha was born. Am asa Lyman died in 1865 of measles at the age of nine months.(Amos came t o Arizona when he was 19 years old. He was mayor of Pima, Ariz for 10 yea rs. He was also a Pony Express rider.)
      Jonathan established a tannery business on North Ist East in Brigha m City. Later he went into the mercantile business. Still later he joine d the Co-op Mercantile, acting as the first manager of that Co-op. He wa s also a nightwatchman at the City Hall. On the 17th of June 1869, whil e in the line of duty as a guard at the City Hall, he was accidently sho t in the hip while trying to thwart the escape of three vicious prisoners . From that time on, Jonathan walked with a limp.
      About 1872, Jonathan married a fourth wife, Ellen Lindquist or Young quist. She was a cripple. With Ellen he left Brigham City and moved to Fr anklin, Idaho. About a year later they moved to Clinton, now called Canno nville. He was ordained the first Bishop there and set apart by Erastus S now, Sunday August 6, 1877,. His son, Nephi, was his first counselor. Thi s same year his fourth wife, Ellen died. Jonathan returned again to Brigh am City to be with his wives, Avilda and Christiana.The Church movement w as reaching into the ever developing western country. The Authorities o f the Church were anxious to establish their religion in the west, conseq uently they encouraged many of their members to journey on into Souther n Utah and Arizona. Jonathan now 66 years old, still had a great love o f adventure, exploration, and a true spirit of pioneering in his blood. H e was ready to go into this uncultivated land still hostile with Indians . On the 1st of May 1883. Jonathon set out with a friend, Mr. Fife, for A rizona. He bade his good wives goodbye with the understanding that Avild a would soon follow him there, Surely when he bid Christiana goodbye, i t must have been hard, for at his age, coupled with the hardships of trav el, she must have felt it would be her last with Jonathan. Christiana die d on the 17th of December 1892 in Brigham City--just nine years after Jon athan left for Arizona.
      Avilda who lived with her doughter Sonora from that time on came t o Arizona with her daughter and family, along with Alonzo and William an d their families. Nephi, Son of Jonathan and Sarah, later followed with h is family, settling in Safford, Arizona. He arrived in Arizona on the 23r d of October 1888.
      Jonathan established a merchantile business in Safford, selling a littl e of everything but specializing in meat. His grand daughters, "Vern," Co ra, Maude, Vessa, "Lottie," and Clara have told how they went to that sto re with small Bull Durham tobacco sacks filled with what they had gleane d from the fields, to buy their candy. At one time, "Vern" told of fillin g a small bucket and buying a small flat iron wnich was a real prize fo r her at that time. She still has this iron in her possession. (1961)
      Jonathan's death occurred at the home of his son, William. He died at th e age of 71- January 29th, 1889. He was buried in Safford, then Layton. H e died as he lived, -in a new country, still a pioneer; building, creatin g, and traveling to spread the gospel which he loved. He lead the way whe re we, his children have followed, -to a home in ARIZONA!
      Avilda lived until the 7th of January 1893. She died at the home o f her daughter, Sonora. (This story is affectionally dedicated to our lit tle MOTHER, Charlotte Beryl "Lottie" (Packer) Freestone, whose life was r ich with the true spirit of our early pioneers.)

      (Our thanks to Cousin Lee Crandall who has worked faithfully as a typis t to cut the stensils to make this story available to all our cousins.)